Search Results for: check the chip

 

August is Microchip Month at Boston Veterinary Care!

Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) answers your FAQs and encourages you to take advantage of their special monthly offer – 25% off your pet’s microchip – registration included!

Did you know… that microchipping your pet DOUBLES their chances of finding their way home?

August 15 is National Check the Chip Day, and for good reason: During the Summer months, pets will be spending more time outside—or may find themselves extra eager to slip out the door into the sunshine. In the event that you and your pet ever become separated, you’ll want to make sure that you are reunited as quickly and easily as possible.

That’s where a microchip comes in handy! Once microchipped, your pet can be identified throughout its life with a one-of-a-kind ID number. For this reason, microchipping has become extremely popular for pet owners, and scanning pets for microchips has become standard practice in veterinary offices, animal hospitals, and animal shelters.

BVC answers your FAQs about microchips and why they are a great idea for you and your pet:

Q: What is a microchip?

A: A microchip is a tiny computer chip, about the size of a grain of rice, programmed with an identification number that is unique to your pet. It is non-toxic, non-allergenic, and will last the life of your pet with no maintenance required. The microchip is injected with a needle beneath the skin between the shoulder blades and is anchored in place as a thin layer of connective tissue forms around it.

Q: Will the implantation of the microchip cause my pet pain?

A: Your pet may feel a slight “pinch” as they would with any other needle injection. Once the microchip in place, however, it does not cause pain and cannot be felt by touch. Many pet owners opt to microchip their pet during routine exams, spay or neutering, or dental cleanings; it’s one less trip to the vet, and your furry companion will probably be too distracted to notice that the injection is happening.

size of a pet microchip

Ever wonder what a pet microchip looks like? It’s as small as a grain of rice! Check out BVC’s August promotion and get your pet microchipped today!

Q: Can all cats and dogs receive a microchip, and at what age?

A: Absolutely! A microchip is recommended for all cats and dogs (even toy breeds) and can be implanted as early as 6-8 weeks of age.

Q: How does microchip identification work?

A: A special non-intrusive scanner is used to send a signal to the microchip to read the identification number. The person reading the scanner can search a national microchip registry to find out the pet owner’s information.

Q: Why should I microchip my pet; isn’t a collar enough?

A: In short, things happen. While a collar with ID tags is an excellent start, there is always a chance that they can be removed or fall off.  Think of a microchip as a permanent ID tag for your pet—and a fail-safe way to verify that you’re their owner.

Microchips have reunited thousands of pets with their owners, even ones who have been missing for years or traveled many miles away! If your pet were to go astray, any veterinarian’s office, animal hospital, or animal shelter would be able to scan your pet’s microchip and contact you immediately. Be sure to keep your contact information current in the national microchip registry database to ensure an easy reunion with your pet – some microchip companies even let you add a backup contact.

Q: My microchipped pet is missing. What do I do?

A: The first step is to contact your pet’s microchip manufacturer (e.g, PetLink, Home Again) and provide them with your pet’s unique microchip number. If your pet has already been located, they’ll be able to tell you where to pick up your pet. If your pet’s whereabouts have not yet been located, it means that their microchip has not yet been scanned by a local animal shelter, animal hospital, or veterinarian. The microchip manufacturer will put an alert in the system so that when your pet’s microchip IS scanned they can contact you right away.

Take advantage of Boston Veterinary Care’s special August promotion!

This month, BVC clients will receive 25% off microchipping – registration included – with an exam or procedure; not to be combined with any other offer. Click here or call (617) 226-5606 for more details or to make an appointment.

TOO HOT FOR SPOT! For more advice on how to keep your pet safe in the warmer months, visit arlboston.org/summersafety

 

Hurricane Season has Officially Begun

Make sure to include animals in any emergency plan

The 2018 hurricane season officially began on June 1, and it’s a perfect time to review and possibly revise the emergency plans for you, your family, and your pets – yes your pets.

Imagine: A storm on the horizon, people are scrambling in grocery stores for food, water and supplies, your neighbors are boarding up windows and making preparations, everyone around you is anxious – this is when your pets need you most and it’s up to you to ensure they’re safe.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is predicting a near-or-above-normal hurricane season that could include 10-16 named storms, 5-9 hurricanes, and 1-4 major hurricanes.

The threat is there and here are some things to keep in mind when planning for an emergency:

1. Disaster Kit. Each animal in your household needs their own kit and should include at least a one-week supply of food and water, along with collapsible dishes; a week supply of medication; photographs, tags, and other identification; leash, harness, crate/carrier; toys, blankets and treats; poop bags, litter and litter tray
2. Pet-Friendly Evacuation Centers. Many, but not all, evacuation centers allow pets. Check your area for not only evacuation centers, but pet-friendly hotels, boarding facilities, and even friends or relatives that would allow you and your pets to stay.
3. Make Sure Your Pet is Microchipped. It’s the simplest way to be reunited with your pet should you become separated. If your pet is already microchipped, make sure all contact information is correct and up to date.
4. The Buddy System. Connect with friends and neighbors to ensure that someone is willing to evacuate your pets if you are unable to.

Preparedness is responsible pet ownership! For more useful pet safety advice, visit arlboston.org/helpfultips.

 

Is Your Pet Lost?

Is Your Pet Lost?

To download our informational handout, please click here.

Take these 4 steps to have the best chance at bringing your pet home safely

  1. File a lost report with ARL, either in person or over the phone. This lost report is seen by all three ARL locations. The staff will ask you to e-mail or bring in a photo of your pet.
  2. Call the local Animal Control Officer of the town where your pet lives, and of the town that your pet went missing in.
  3. Contact your pet’s microchip company, if your pet has one, to notify them that your pet is lost. Be sure to confirm that your contact information is current.
  4. Contact other local organizations, such as the MSPCA at (617) 522-5055 or North Shore Animal Hospital at (781) 596-0510.

Other helpful tips:

Remember to never chase a pet that is in “flight mode”

If your pet is running away from you, the sound of yelling, heavy breathing, and loud footsteps will only encourage them to increase their speed – and pay less attention to their surroundings (i.e., speeding cars). For tips on how to deal with panicked pets that may need to be trapped, contact ARL Rescue Services at (617) 426-9170, then press “1”.

For more information, call the Animal Rescue League of Boston at (617) 426-9170

 

Play it Safe in the Cold

6 winter pet safety tips to protect your pet from the elements

Oh, the weather outside is frightful… It’s winter in New England and the snow, ice, and frigid winds from the Atlantic are upon us. While our human instincts are to cozy-up indoors with a heated blanket and cup of hot cocoa, we know that it’s impossible to hibernate all winter long; even our pets have places to go and people to see!

When you and your pet brave the outdoors, follow these 6 winter pet safety tips:

1. Prepare Rover for the elements. If your dog typically has a longer coat, let it grow out for the winter; it will provide warmth and protection from the cold. If your pup has a short coat, keep him warm with a coat or a sweater. Just like you, your furry friend will enjoy the outdoors much more if he isn’t shivering!

winter pet safety tips

BONUS TIP: Snow can sometimes affects a pet’s sense of smell and their ability to navigate home! Make sure your pet’s microchip and identification tag are up-to-date in the event you and your pet become separated.

2. Keep Fido on a leash. Dogs can easily lose their scent in the snow, so never let your pet off-leash during a snowstorm, or when there’s ice or snow on the ground. If you’re walking near “frozen” ponds, lakes, or streams, remember that ice is not always uniformly thick or stable, and your pup could fall through into the icy water!

3. DON’T forget to check under the hood. Cats love to warm up underneath the hood of a car, as the residual heat from the engine burns off. Unfortunately, this method of warming up can have dangerous consequences, such as severe burns and other grave injuries. Always pound on the hood of your vehicle and do a quick visual check to wake a napping kitty before you stick the key in the ignition.

4. DO winterize outdoor accommodations. If your livestock or neighborhood feral can’t be moved into a warm garage or basement, ensure that they have adequate protection against the elements. A winter-friendly outdoor shelter should have three enclosed sides, be raised off the ground, have heated water bowls to prevent freezing, and contain bedding, such as clean straw. The space should be big enough for the animal to lay down, stand, and turn around, but small enough to help trap the heat.

5. Wipe off your dog’s paws and stomach. Sidewalks are often treated with rock salt, antifreeze, and other dangerous chemicals. Not only can these chemicals sting your pooch’s paws, but they can be poisonous if ingested. Keep pet wipes by your front door to clean off you dog’s paws and stomach before he licks them first!

6. Never leave your pet alone in a cold car. Just as it’s TOO HOT FOR SPOT in the summer, the temperature in your car can become TOO LOW FOR FIDO and dangerously cold in the winter. The toasty temperatures inside your vehicle don’t stick around for long once the engine is turned off. Always bring your pet indoors with you or leave them safe and warm at home!

For more pet owner resources, click here.

 

7 Holiday Pet Safety Tips

DON’T FORGET… to help your pet have a furry and bright holiday too!

7 holiday pet safety tips to guarantee a celebratory season for everyone in your family:

holiday pet safety

Ditch the tinsel. Our feline friends often think this eye-catching decoration is a toy. Ingestion of this seemingly harmless material can lead to a obstructed digestive tract, severe vomiting, dehydration and possible surgery.

1. Decorate with care. Ribbons and tinsel are especially attractive and hazardous to cats, as they can end up their intestinal tract, causing string foreign body blockage. Holiday plants like mistletoe, holly, and poinsettias can cause vomiting, upset stomach, and blisters in your pet’s mouth. Avoid placing lit candles anywhere your pet can reach or on a surface that can be toppled over.

2. Secure your Christmas tree. Your frisky feline won’t be the first to topple over a 6-foot fir! Support your tree with a sturdy stand and wires to prevent tipping, should they decide to make a leap for it. For your canine companions, consider surrounding the base with a baby gate and hanging fragile ornaments higher on your tree.

3. Watch out for wires. Chewing on electrical cords can cause severe oral burns and even fatal shocks for cats and dogs. Secure cords with plastic casing you can find at a hardware store, or cover with a bitter-tasting, non-toxic product from your local pet supply shop.

4. Toss out table scraps. Although it’s tempting, avoid giving  your dog any meat bones that can become lodged in their throat, stomach, or intestinal tract. Also steer clear of sugary or alcoholic beverages, fat trimmings, raw dough and cake batter, onions, mushrooms, and grapes, which can cause severe abdominal issues, organ failure, toxicity, and even death. Allow your furry friend  to indulge with extra tasty pet treats instead!

5. Travel safely. If your entire family is making the trip to grandma’s house, securing your pet in a crate or seat belt harness may save their life should you get into an accident. If your pet isn’t used to being on the road, place treats and toys in and around your parked car a few days before your travels to let them sniff around. Then take a spin around the block to get them comfortable in the moving vehicle. You don’t want to begin a two hour trek only to find out that they become easily carsick!

6. Keep your pet stress-free. The holidays can be a stressful time of year for everyone- including your pets!  If your pet is timid around new people or those they rarely see, it may be best to keep them in a separate quiet room with toys and treats to keep them occupied.

7. Check the (micro)chip. Many animal shelters report increases of “stray” animals during the holidays when pets are more likely to escape as visitors go in and out of the front door. Be sure your microchip contact information is current and that your pet’s collar is always on to ensure an easy reunion.

From everyone at ARL,

Happy Holidays!

 

For more pet owner resources, click here.

Job Posting: Dedham Shelter Supervisor – Intake/Cemetery

RESPONSIBLE TO: Shelter Manager, Shelter Assistant Manager (Dedham)

 

SUMMARY: 

Responsible, under the direction of Dedham Assistant Shelter Manager, for the general overall day to day supervision and operation of the Dedham Shelter with a particular emphasis on the Intake Office, as well as acting as a liaison for the Pine Ridge Cemetery.   This hourly position is responsible for assessing and evaluating animals for admission into the shelter according to Animal Rescue League of Boston policy and philosophy, as outlined in the ARL Intake Position Statement with special placements of animals, such as with rescue groups, barns (cats), and transfers to animal control agencies. Although primarily Dedham focused, this position requires strategic thinking and careful coordinating with branch managers, Rescue and mobile operations, and other organizations, such as Animal Control Officers to prioritize and optimize the intake process across the organization.

Additionally, this position is key to Pine Ridge Pet Cemetery operations because it consist of managing every aspect of the office, which includes but not limited to the primary functions of all client interactions for Cemetery business, scheduling burials, receiving deceased animals, accepting payment and creating receipts, coordinating the return of ashes, maintaining and scheduling duties for cemetery workers and record keeping.

This position has to be flexible in the duties and responsibilities to best fit the changing needs of Dedham Adoption Center, Pine Ridge Pet Cemetery, and the mission of the Animal Rescue League of Boston.

 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

  1. *Must be able to handle a wide variety of animals effectively and in a humane manner. Must be able to respond to an emergency situation or rescue and be able to assess the need for back-up equipment or personnel;
  2. *Must complete a ninety (90) day orientation and training period;
  3. *Must maintain a good attendance record;
  4. *The regular workweek is 40 hours, but must be willing to work a reasonable amount of overtime or when other duties require it at night, weekends and holidays.  Must be willing to work weekends or rotating schedule.  Must be willing and able to assume the duties of a Shelter Agent and any other duties as assigned;
  5. *Must be able to perform intake examinations of animals to assess ‘fast track’ animals and animals needing immediate medical intervention. Must know or be able to learn ARL protocols for intake vaccines and be able to administer vaccines upon intake of animals. Maintain awareness of exposure to animal related parasites and infectious diseases;
  6. *Must know or be able to learn and perform the ARL approved techniques for the euthanasia of animals.  Evaluate animals being surrendered for euthanasia according to ARL policies and make decisions regarding euthanasia as a member of the management team. Ensure strict guideline and security with the euthanasia solution and euthanasia protocol;
  7. *Responsible for assessing alternative placement options for cats, dogs, small animals and livestock, maintaining current contacts for placement options and recruiting new ones;
  8. *Must be able to work efficiently with Dedham Animal Control officer for receiving of town of Dedham’s stray canines. Responsible for complying with town contract, state stray animal control regulations, coordinating kenneling space, animal owner returns, collection and processing of fees, coordinating quarantine releases, and any other required duties;
  9. *Must be able to work efficiently in a busy office performing multiple tasks including answering telephones, manage and maintain the message systems, email, social media, data entry, accessing the computer system for information, completing paper work, assisting the public, maintaining appointment logs, and collect and process service fees in a neat and accurate manner. Provide service and information over the phone and through email to the public and other organizations in a prompt professional manner. Must be aware of alternative resources for clients looking for assistance if the Animal Rescue League of Boston is unable to provide assistance. Must also perform other duties associated with the operations of the intake office and Pine Ridge Cemetery, as well as be able to perform all duties of a Shelter Agent;
  10. *Responsible for cross-referencing lost animal reports with found animal reports and animals admitted to the shelter.  Responsible for exercising due diligence relating to stray animals admitted to the shelter which may include activities such as: posting animals to websites, contacting Animal Control officers in the town where the animal came from, checking microchip reports, etc.;
  11. *Responsible for  being part of the management team that performs daily animal inventory checks and ensures that all animals are admitted, vaccinated, evaluated, held and discharged correctly. Required to participate, collaborate, and attend various management team related and volunteer/staff related meetings for shelter operations and intake. A high priority is placed on overseeing animals received at the Dedham shelter through the animal transport program ensuring that all isolation, vaccine, and care protocols are followed and collaborating with the other branch intake supervisors and volunteer departments for transfer;
  12. *Must be able to act independently in a management role in the absence of the Manager or Assistant Manager, including coaching, mentoring, and delegating to staff and volunteers;
  13. *Interview and counsel clients surrendering, reclaiming and looking for lost pets. Ensure accurate and complete filling out of intake information. Provide training tips; pet care information, and other animal related information and resources;
  14. *Must be willing and able to assume responsibility for opening and closing various areas of the campus on weekends, nights and holidays in the absence of the Shelter Manager and Shelter Assistant Manager. This includes making sure the animals have been properly cared for and securing the premises;
  15. * Must be capable of working independently and be able to support a team approach to operational decision-making and problem solving.  Must be able to learn, interpret, exercise, and explain the ARL’s mission, policies, and procedures accurately, as well as those for Pine Ridge Pet Cemetery.  Must be creative and cost effective in streamlining operations. Assist any employee reporting to the position;
  16. *Arrange burials or cremations for deceased animals and handle deceased pets in a respectful and humane manner;
  17. *Make arrangements for cremation remains to be returned to client by scheduling appointments for pick up in Dedham, arranging the mailing of ashes by UPS, or transporting them to pick up location.   Contact clients to inform them about arrangements and pick-ups information;
  18. Since the Intake office area is open and or visible by the public, a strong emphasis must be placed on appearance.  Maintain all areas in a neat, clean and organized fashion. Follow the ARL dress code and wear the ARL uniform and name tag;
  19.  *Establish and maintain a network of resources through conferring and working with other humane animal welfare organizations, shelters, animal control officers and facilities, veterinarians, and animal hospitals;
  20. *Drive an animal ambulance and do emergency calls whenever needed.  Keep the vehicle clean, well-stocked and ready for use at all times.  Report any accidents, vehicle damage or need for vehicle or equipment repairs to the shelter manager immediately;
  21. *Perform general grounds keeping work including snow and ice removal, evaluation and maintenance of environment for safety in all animal and human areas as well as trash pick-up. Responsible for reporting shelter equipment deficiencies or repairs.  Follow-up to ensure completion;
  22. *Maintain inventory of cemetery and intake program supplies and make recommendations of purchasing needs.

 

QUALIFICATIONS: 

  1. Must be a High School graduate or equivalent.  A minimum of an Associate degree in related animal welfare field, preferred;
  2. Minimum of one year of prior animal handling experience, preferably working in a humane organization.  Certified Euthanasia Technician, preferred;
  3. Must have a current and valid Massachusetts Driver’s License and be insurable with the ARL Insurance policy for driving a ARL vehicle;
  4. Must be of good moral character, with an even disposition, and the ability to deal effectively, compassionately, and politely with a diverse group of people in various situations.  This person must have definite abilities to evaluate problems accurately and display good, sound judgment when working without supervision and under emotional stress.  These are extremely important and critical qualifications;
  5. A high level of professionalism, customer service skills, and strong interpersonal skills are required. Excellent verbal and written communication skills and computer skills, required;
  6. Must be physically capable of performing all the duties of Shelter Supervisor including moderately heavy work.  Required to lift at least 50 pounds.

 

TO APPLY:

Please submit cover letter and resume to careers@arlboston.org (please include the job title in your email subject line) or:
Human Resources Department
Animal Rescue League of Boston
10 Chandler Street
Boston, MA 02116

HR fax (617)-423-6201
arlboston.org


The Animal Rescue League of Boston is an equal opportunity employer, and we make all employment-related decisions without regard to race, color, creed, national origin, ancestry, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, genetic information, veteran’s status or any other protected characteristic.

 

Community Cat Services

 Community Cat Services

As an unwavering champion for animals in need, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) believes that the challenges that face community cats require our attention and action.

ARL’s Community Cat Initiative was created to address the estimated 700,000 “community cats”, (feral, semi-feral and outdoor cats), unowned and living in harsh weather conditions. A dedicated rescue agent assesses a colony of cats and formulates TNR (Trap-Neuter-Return) plans; cats also receive veterinary treatment and are assessed for sociability and adoption potential.

Community Cats

Outdoor cats can be found in almostPG7_CCs every neighborhood across the country. These cats include community cats (friendly strays, abandoned, or feral) and owned cats that are allowed outdoors to roam. Community cat colonies usually form due to a conducive environment, such as outdoor cats already living in a particular area, an established food source (including dumpsters or trash cans), or a form of shelter or protection.

At ARL, we are focused on community cats; those that live outdoors and are unowned, but are a part of our local communities. It is important to remember that cats living in community colonies are not all considered “feral” but consist of a combination of feral, shy, and friendly stray cats all living together. Previously, the animal welfare term “feral” was often associated with “bad cats” or “other cats.” While feral cats are different in the sense that they have not been properly socialized with humans, they are biologically the same as owned house cats.

Community cats face many challenges living outdoors. Without proper shelter and care, they are at risk of illness and injury. Additionally, without spay/neuter surgery, these cats can produce many litters and continue the cycle of large colonies of unowned cats. It is estimated that over 700,000 cats roam free in Massachusetts with 70,000 in Boston alone.

To best serve the cats in greatest need, we have committed to a comprehensive approach. We have hired ARL’s first dedicated Community Cats Rescue Agents and started a Community Surgical Clinic at our Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center.

Watch a video about ARL’s new community cat initiative

Community Cats Rescue Agents

Our Rescue Agents will respond to the call of residents who report a colony of cats, investigating the colony to determine the number of cats and kittens residing in that area, the cats’ overall health status, and whether or not a local resident is feeding them regularly and can continue.

After the initial assessment, a TNR (Trap-Neuter- Return) plan is formulated for that particular colony. TNR is one of the most humane and effective ways to stop the cycle of homelessness among cats. Spay and neuter surgeries are low risk and proven to improve the safety and health of these cats as well as the community as a whole. The plan also includes vaccines, and whether each cat will be returned to the colony, returned to their owner if microchipped, or admitted to an ARL shelter to be put up for adoption if they are friendly.

The Community Surgical Clinic

Located at ARL’s Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center, the Community Surgical Clinic (CSC) is staffed by ARL’s Medical Director. The clinic provides TNR services to community cats through our Community Cats Rescue Agent, as well as offer low-cost spay and neuter services for pet owners who have received a Massachusetts Animal Fund voucher from their local animal control officer. The CSC also provides local animal control officers with an additional surgical resource for dogs and cats held in their respective municipal shelters.

Change the Lives of Cats at Risk

We are excited about our commitment to help keep community cats safe and healthy in the habitats in which they live but we need your investment in order to provide the best outcome for these cats. To fully support these innovative programs and help more than 1,500 cats lead healthier lives, we need to raise $204,000 annually. Donate now. For more information, contact Jackie Smith at jsmith@arlboston, or (617) 226-5608.

Learn more about how you can help.

 

Trap, Neuter, Return

ARL serves community cats through our Community Cats Rescue Agent and our Community Cat Volunteer Squad, providing Trap – Neuter – Return services. Please call (617) 426-9170 then press “1″ for Rescue Services.

Announcements & Events

ARL holds multiple cat food drives throughout the year to provide community cat feeders with a much needed supply of food for the community cat colonies in their care.

We also host the Boston Homeless Cats Group meetings quarterly. The mission of Boston Homeless Cats Group is to provide education, networking and collaborative partnerships to further benefit the needs of cats and kittens in the Greater Boston area. If you’re interested in attending these meetings, please call (857) 413-5959 to RSVP.

For a list of ARL’s upcoming community cats events, please see below: 

Sorry, there are no upcoming community cats events. Please check back for updates.

 

Bark if You Love October

ARL Shares Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Adopt an Adult Dog

If you’ve considered adding a canine companion to your family, there’s no better time than NOW to ADOPT! October is National Adopt-a-Dog Month and the ARL has many adult dogs looking for their forever homes!

Search adoptable dogs

Coretta

Meet Coretta, an extra sweet 3-year-young mixed breed who would love an active home to call her own! Click her photo to learn more about her.

Many potential adopters visit animal shelters looking for a puppy. While puppies are absolutely adorable, they are also very energetic and their personalities, likes, and dislikes are still emerging.

That’s why adopting an adult dog can be a great decision for you and your family! (Hint: At ARL shelters, adult dogs are 1 year and older.)

When you come into ARL’s shelters in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham, our knowledgeable adoption agents will ask you about what you’re looking for in a dog in terms of energy level, personality, and compatibility with children and other pets.

It won’t take long for you to realize that one of the biggest perks of adopting an adult dog is that what you see, is what you get.

Adult dogs have passed their critical development stages, so you’ll get a good idea of whether or not their personality and energy level is the right fit for your home. They may also be an easier introduction info the family, as puppies can be fragile and act quite timid in an already active household.

Not yet convinced? The ARL’s shares top 5 reasons why you should adopt an adult dog this October:

  1. You’ll save a life. When you adopt, you actually save two lives: the life of the dog that you adopted, and the life of the dog that is going to take its place at the shelter. Your new pet will thank you again and again for being their hero with slobbery kisses!
  2. You’ll meet your perfect canine companion. At the ARL, each dog is thoroughly evaluated to assess their medical history and overall temperament. They are then given a customized behavioral and enrichment plan to prepare them for life in their future home. All this information will be presented to you at the time of the potential adoption so that you and your family members can decide if the dog you’re interested in is the right match for you.
  3. You’ll find variety. If you have your mind set on a dog of a particular breed or temperament, chances are that one of ARL’s shelters will  have what you’re looking for! Various purebreds and mixed breeds come into our shelter at any given time, so we always have new dogs available! Don’t see a canine that catches your eye? Keep checking our list of current adoptables, as it changes every day!
  4. You’ll save money. Every adoptable dog at the ARL receives the following included in their adoption fee: health screening and veterinary examination; spay or neuter services; vaccinations; heartworm test and preventative; flea and tick treatment; intestinal parasite scan; microchip identification and registration; tag and collar.
  5. You’ll be doing something especially kind for animals in need. Adult dogs usually stay at our shelters much longer than puppies do. That’s why shelters usually charge a smaller adoption fee for adult dogs- to incentivize people to adopt them!

To meet our adoptable dogs, stop by our adoption centers in BostonBrewster, and Dedham on Tuesdays – Sundays from 1pm – 6:30pm. If you meet the dog of your dreams, in most cases you can take him or her home with you the same day!

 

 

ADOPT, Don’t Shop December 18-20

Big things come in small packages, so why not give a shelter pet a home for the holidays!

If you’ve been considering giving a pet as a present this holiday season, then stop by the ARL this weekend and take advantage of our Home for the Holidays adoption special and FREE GIFT!

At the ARL, we know that BIG THINGS COME IN SMALL PACKAGES...

From TODAY Friday, December 18 through Sunday, December 20, ARL’s shelters are offering $20 off the adoption fee of all small animals to help them find a HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS!

Many people think animal shelters only have dogs and cats, but at the ARL we have the capacity and knowledge to take in a variety of small animals, including rabbits, guinea pigs, gerbils, mice, rats, hamsters, and  ferrets.

Small animals like Edgar the Shorthaired rabbit, Fluffy the bling Guinea Pig, and Huey, Dewey, and Louie the hamsters make great companions for pet “newbies”, families with limited space, or people with allergies to cats or dogs.

big things come in small packages

Fluffy is a 3-year-old blind Guinea Pig looking for a special family to bring her home for the holidays! Come visit her at our Brewster shelter!

ADOPT SMALL, SAVE BIG! At the ARL, all of this is included in your pet’s adoption fee:

  • spay or neuter services
  • health screening and veterinary exam
  • behavioral screening and evaluation
  • vaccinations
  • parasite treatment
  • a microchip, when applicable

If you’re interested in adopting a small animal, don’t forget to bring in a photo of the cage that your new furry companion will be living in.

COME EARLY AND JINGLE ALL THE WAY HOME: Receive a “Home for the Holidays” Pet Pack to help your new furry family get settled into their new homewith every animal adoption from December 18-20, while supplies last!

Participating ARL locations include…

December 18, 19, and 20:

ARL Boston Shelter 10 Chandler Street, Boston
Phone: (617) 426-9170
Hours: 1:00 pm – 6:30 pm

ARL Brewster Shelter 3981 Main St (Rte 6A), East Brewster

big things come in small packages

Barney (pictured) along with many other rabbits are waiting to meet their new families! Click Barney’s photo to view a complete list of available small animals.

Phone: (508) 255-1030
Hours: 1:00 pm – 6:30 pm

December 19 ONLY:

ARL Dedham Mobile Adoptions 163 Highland Ave, Needham Petco
Phone: (781) 326-0729
Hours: 11:00 am – 5:00 pm

TWO MORE GIFT IDEAS FOR YOUR FELLOW ANIMAL LOVERS:

1. Donate supplies to ARL’s shelter pets! They made their lists… and checked it twice. View our Boston adoption center wish list, Brewster adoption center wish list, and Dedham adoption center wish list!

2. Give a gift that’s especially furry and bright! Donate $25 or more in honor of animal-friendly colleagues, friends, and family members this holiday season, and you can choose a complimentary card to let them know about the special gift you gave in their name. Click here to select your tribute card!

THANK YOU to Onyx Hotel, Hotel Marlowe, Hotel Nine Zero, I and Love and You, and Boston Veterinary Care for donating to the Home for the Holidays Pet Pack!

…and to Macy’s for helping to spread awareness about the importance of animal adoptions this holiday season!

 

Home for the Holidays Adoption Events

Big things come in small packages, so why not give a shelter pet a home for the holidays!

If you’ve been considering giving a pet as a present this holiday season, then stop by the ARL this weekend and take advantage of our Home for the Holidays adoption special and FREE GIFT!

At the ARL, we know that BIG THINGS COME IN SMALL PACKAGES...

From Friday, December 18 through Sunday, December 20, ARL’s shelters are offering $20 off the adoption fee of all small animals to help them find a HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS!

Many people think animal shelters only have dogs and cats, but at the ARL we have the capacity and knowledge to take in a variety of small animals, including rabbits, guinea pigs, gerbils, mice, rats, hamsters, and  ferrets.

Small animals like Edgar the Shorthaired rabbit, Fluffy the bling Guinea Pig, and Huey, Dewey, and Louie the hamsters make great companions for pet “newbies”, families with limited space, or people with allergies to cats or dogs.

big things come in small packages

Fluffy is a 3-year-old blind Guinea Pig looking for a special family to bring her home for the holidays! Come visit her at our Brewster shelter!

ADOPT SMALL, SAVE BIG! At the ARL, all of this is included in your pet’s adoption fee:

  • spay or neuter services
  • health screening and veterinary exam
  • behavioral screening and evaluation
  • vaccinations
  • parasite treatment
  • a microchip, when applicable

If you’re interested in adopting a small animal, don’t forget to bring in a photo of the cage that your new furry companion will be living in.

COME EARLY AND JINGLE ALL THE WAY HOME: Receive a “Home for the Holidays” Pet Pack to help your new furry family get settled into their new homewith every animal adoption from December 18-20, while supplies last!

Participating ARL locations include…

December 18, 19, and 20:

ARL Boston Shelter 10 Chandler Street, Boston
Phone: (617) 426-9170
Hours: 1:00 pm – 6:30 pm

ARL Brewster Shelter 3981 Main St (Rte 6A), East Brewster

big things come in small packages

Barney (pictured) along with many other rabbits are waiting to meet their new families! Click Barney’s photo to view a complete list of available small animals.

Phone: (508) 255-1030
Hours: 1:00 pm – 6:30 pm

December 19 ONLY:

ARL Dedham Mobile Adoptions 163 Highland Ave, Needham Petco
Phone: (781) 326-0729
Hours: 11:00 am – 5:00 pm

TWO MORE GIFT IDEAS FOR YOUR FELLOW ANIMAL LOVERS:

1. Donate supplies to ARL’s shelter pets! They made their lists… and checked it twice. View our Boston adoption center wish list, Brewster adoption center wish list, and Dedham adoption center wish list!

2. Give a gift that’s especially furry and bright! Donate $25 or more in honor of animal-friendly colleagues, friends, and family members this holiday season, and you can choose a complimentary card to let them know about the special gift you gave in their name. Click here to select your tribute card!

THANK YOU to Onyx Hotel, Hotel Marlowe, Hotel Nine Zero, I and Love and You, and Boston Veterinary Care for donating to the Home for the Holidays Pet Pack!

…and to Macy’s for helping to spread awareness about the importance of animal adoptions this holiday season!