Search Results for: too hot for spot

 

Understanding Too Hot For Spot

Heat Stroke is NO Joke and Can be Deadly

The Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Too Hot for Spot annual campaign kicks off this month, and this week we’re focusing on heat stroke. Heat stroke is potentially fatal, which is why you should never leave your animal in a hot car as temperatures can soar to well over 100 degrees in a matter of minutes. Here’s some Q & A on heat stroke basics.

Q. What is heat stroke?

A. Heat stroke is a serious condition caused by your pet’s body overheating, usually as a result of prolonged exposure to high temperatures.

Q. What makes cats and dogs susceptible to heat stroke?

A. Pets don’t sweat the way humans do, which makes them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat. If their core body temperature rises too high, they run the risk of going into shock or organ failure.

Q. Which symptoms should I look for when trying to diagnose heat stroke in my pet?

A. More obvious symptoms include: difficulty breathing, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness. More subtle symptoms include: heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, excessive thirst, and lethargy.

Q. Is there anything I can do until my pet receives veterinary attention?

A. While you wait for assistance, apply cool wet towels to the groin and “underarm” areas. If your pet is alert enough, try having them slowly sip cold water.

Q. How can I protect my cat or dog from getting heat stroke altogether?

A. Prevention is always your best bet. On hot days, leave your pet at home in a cool room with an accessible bowl of cold water. If your pet must be outdoors, find a shady spot with ample air flow and limit exercise to the morning or evening hours.

Every Second Counts

If you suspect that your pet is suffering from heat stroke, seek IMMEDIATE medical attention from a veterinarian.

 

Understanding Too Hot For Spot

What you need to know to help an animal in distress

The Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Too Hot for Spot annual campaign kicks off this month, and this week we’re focusing on the law itself, and what you need to know in order to legally help an animal in distress.

S. 2369, An Act to Prevent Animal Suffering and Death, became law in November 2016, and prohibits pet owners from confining any animal in a motor vehicle when extreme heat or cold could reasonably be expected to threaten the health of the animal. It also allows first responders and ordinary citizens to intervene, however, only by following certain protocols.

What can first responders do?

First responders – including Animal Control Officers (ACO), law enforcement officials, and firefighters – may, after making reasonable efforts to locate the motor vehicle’s owner, enter the vehicle by any reasonable means to protect the health and safety of animals.

The entry must be for the sole purpose of assisting the animal. The responders may not search the vehicle or seize items unless otherwise permitted by the law. The first responder must leave a written notice with the officer or firefighter’s name, title, and the address of the location where the animal may be retrieved.

What can regular citizens like you do?

If a citizen finds an animal in a vehicle, the citizen must make reasonable efforts to locate the vehicle’s owner.

A citizen shall not enter a vehicle to protect an animal in immediate danger unless the citizen notifies law enforcement or calls 911 and determines that the motor vehicle is locked or there is no other reasonable means for exit; does not use more force than reasonably necessary to enter the vehicle and remove the animal; and has a good faith and reasonable belief, based upon known circumstances, that entry in to the vehicle is necessary to prevent imminent danger or harm to the animal.

What else does this new law include?

This new also amends the anti-tethering statute, which means that dogs cannot be:

  • Tethered to a stationary object for longer than 5 hours in a 24-hour period
  • Tethered outside from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., unless not for more than 15 minutes and when the owner, guardian, or keeper is present
  • Confined outside when a weather advisory, warning, or watch is issued by local, state, or federal authorities; or when environmental conditions such as extreme heat, cold, rain, snow, or hail pose as adverse risk to health or safety of the dog, based upon the dog’s breed, age, or physical condition and unless tethered for less than 15 minutes.

Being Held Accountable

This legislation supports animal welfare so animals can find protection from cruel or abusive situations and those inflicting such behavior can be held accountable for their actions.

Officers, including law enforcement officers from ARL and MSPCA, have the authority to write warnings and citations for violations, with fines ranging from $50 for a first offense to $500 for subsequent offenses. Penalties may also include impoundment or loss of ownership of the animal.

Prevention is Responsible Pet Ownership

When the temperature rises, prevention is always your best bet. Whenever possible, leave your pet at home in a low humidity and temperature-controlled room. If your pet is outdoors, find a nice, shady spot, and keep a bowl of cold water accessible at all times. Remember, your animal depends on you, so it’s up to you to keep them safe, happy, and healthy.

 

 

When the Temperature Rises — It’s TOO HOT FOR SPOT

ARL Wants Your Pet to be Safe and Comfortable All Summer Long

In typical New England fashion, this week spring suddenly turned into summer, with heat, humidity and near record-setting temperatures forecasted. As part of the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) annual safety campaign, “Too Hot for Spot”, ARL wants to remind pet owners about the dangers of leaving an animal in a hot car.

As temperatures rise, so do concerns about animal safety. Even with temperatures below 80 degrees, the threat for heat stroke still exists. Remember, pets don’t sweat like humans do, making them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat.

Keep your pet safe and healthy by following these important guidelines:

  •      Prevention is always your best bet. Whenever possible, leave your pet at home in a low humidity and temperature-controlled room.
  •      If your pet must be outdoors, find a shady spot with ample air flow to prevent overheating.
  •      Hydration. This is key, so keep a bowl of cold water accessible at all times.
  •      Exercise wisely. Limit exercise to the morning or evening hours when temperatures are at their coolest.
  •      Never leave your pet alone in a parked car. When the outside temperature is just 80 degrees, inside a parked car, the temperature can rise to more than 100 degrees in a matter of minutes, leaving your pet susceptible to deadly heat stroke. It’s also illegal in Massachusetts, thanks to the passage of S. 2369.

Prevention is Responsible Pet Ownership

By following these simple guidelines, you can help your pet limit the possibility for any heat-related health issues. However, if you notice excessive panting, weakness, rapid breathing or balance issues, and suspect a heat-related problem, bring your pet to a veterinarian immediately.

 

Too Hot for Spot

Too Hot for Spot

The Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) annual safety campaign, “Too Hot for Spot”, reminds pet owners about the dangers of leaving an animal in a hot car.

When temperatures begin to rise, so do concerns about animal safety. Even when the mercury dips below 80 degrees, the threat for heat stroke still exists. Pets don’t sweat the way humans do, making them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat.

Keep your pet safe and healthy by following these important basic guidelines:

      • Prevention is always your best bet. Whenever possible, leave your pet at home in a cool humidity and temperature-regulated room.
      • If your pet must be outdoors, find a shady spot with ample air flow to prevent overheating.
      • Hydration is key, so keep a bowl of cold water accessible at all times.
      • Limit exercise to the morning or evening hours when temperatures are at their coolest.
      • Never leave your pet alone in a parked car—even with the air conditioner on or the windows cracked. Learn the dangerous consequences of leaving your pet in a hot car.

Spot an animal in imminent danger or distress? Contact your local Animal Control Office or Police Department.

This important message, as well as the efforts of ARL’s Advocacy Department and our many supporters, turned ARL’s Too Hot for Spot campaign into permanent law.

Click here to download this information.

Too Hot for Spot Becomes Law

As of November 16, 2016, S.2369, An Act to Prevent Animal Suffering and Death, prohibits pet owners from confining any animal in a motor vehicle when extreme heat or cold could reasonably be expected to threaten the health of the animal.

What can first responders do?

First responders –including Animal Control Officers, law enforcement officials, and firefighters- may, after making reasonable efforts to locate the motor vehicle’s owner, enter the vehicle by any reasonable means to protect the health and safety of animals.

The entry must be for the sole purpose of assisting the animal. The responders may not search the vehicle or seize items unless otherwise permitted by the law. The first responder must leave a written notice with the office or firefighter’s name, title, and the address of the location where the animal may be retrieved.

What can regular citizens like me do?

If a citizen finds an animal in a vehicle, the citizen must make reasonable efforts to locate a motor vehicle’s owner.

A citizen shall not enter a motor vehicle to protect an animal in immediate danger unless the citizen notifies law enforcement or calls 911 and determines that the motor vehicle is locked or there is no other reasonable means for exit; does not use more force than reasonably necessary to enter the motor vehicle and remove the animal; and has a good faith and reasonable belief, based upon known circumstances, that entry into the vehicle is necessary to prevent imminent danger or harm to the animal.

What else does this new law include?

This new law also amends the anti-tethering statue, which means that dogs cannot be:

  • Tethered to a stationary object for longer than 5 hours in a 24-hour period
  • Tethered outside from 10:00PM until 6:00AM, unless not for more than 15 minutes and when the owner, guardian, or keeper is present
  • Confined outside when a weather advisory, warning, or watch is issued by local, state, or federal authority; or when environmental conditions such as extreme heat, cold, rain, snow, or hail pose as adverse risk to health or safety of the dog, based upon the dog’s breed, age, or physical condition and unless tethered for less than 15 minutes.

Additionally, law enforcement officers from ARL and MSPCA, who come upon situations where this new law is being violated, now have the authority to issue citations to violators when an Animal Control Officer is unavailable or unresponsive.

Click here to download this information.

Heat Stroke: A Deadly Consequence of Leaving Your Pet in a Hot Car

Did you know… that even when the outside temperature is 80 degrees, the inside of a car can heat up to more than 120 degrees in just minutes – even with the windows cracked!

Watch this video about the dangers of leaving your pet in a hot car

Q. What is heat stroke?

A: Heat stroke is a serious condition caused by your pet’s body overheating, usually as a result of prolonged exposure to or physical exertion in high temperatures. Immediate medical attention by a veterinarian is required.

Q. What makes cats and dogs susceptible to heat stroke?

A: Pets don’t sweat the way humans do, which makes them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat. If their core body temperature rises too high (typically 104 degrees or higher), they run the risk of going into shock or organ failure.

Q. Which symptoms should I look for when trying to diagnose heat stroke in my pet?

A: More obvious symptoms of potential heatstroke in cats and dogs include: difficulty breathing, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness. More subtle symptoms include: heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, excessive thirst, lethargy.

Q. Is there anything I can do until my pet receives medical attention?

A: While you wait for assistance, apply cool wet towels to the groin and “underarm” areas. If your pet is alert enough, try having them slowly sip cold water. Even if your pet begins to appear better or more alert, you should still make an emergency visit to your pet’s veterinarian as only they will be able to diagnose whether or not your pet is suffering from heat stroke.

Q. How can I protect my cat or dog from getting heat stroke altogether?

A. Prevention is always your best bet. On hot days, leave your pet at home in a cool humidity and temperature-regulated room and keep them hydrated with a bowl of cold water accessible at all times. If your pet must be outdoors, find a shady spot with ample air flow and limit exercise to the morning or evening hours when temperatures are at their coolest.

If you suspect that your pet is suffering from heat stroke, seek immediate medical attention from a veterinarian.

Click here to download this information.

 

Watch & Share: It’s TOO HOT FOR SPOT

Leaving a pet alone inside a hot car can have dangerous consequences

To raise awareness for this HOT animal welfare issue, the Animal Rescue League of Boston and Boston Veterinary Care ask our followers and the media to share important information about the dangers of leaving pets in parked cars during the warm summer months.

Pets don’t sweat like humans do and cannot cool their bodies efficiently in hot temperatures. Even when the outside temperature is 80 degrees, the inside of a car can heat up to more than 120 degrees in just minutes – even with the windows cracked! That’s why leaving your pet inside of a hot car is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke.

In following video, “Too Hot for Spot – Dangers of Hot Cars for Pets”, ARL’s shelter animals explain the risks of leaving your pet alone inside a parked car.

Click the “play” button below to watch:

Spot a pet alone in a parked car? Follow these 3 steps:

  1. Take down the car’s make, model, and license plate number.
  2. Ask nearby store managers or security guards to make an announcement to find the dog’s owner.
  3. If the owner can’t be found, call the non-emergency number of your local police department or Animal Control Officer.

Help us spread the word about this HOT summer safety issue! Stop by ARL’s shelters in Boston and Brewster this Summer and pick up a Too Hot for Spot car magnet!  A donation is appreciated by not required.

SPECIAL THANKS to our Too Hot for Spot media sponsor Animal Hospital of Orleans and our media partners Cool 102, WBZ 1030, NECN, WEEI-FM, WEEI-AM/ESPN, and WRKO-AM.

too hot for spot

 

It’s Too Hot for Spot! Signs of Heat Stroke

BVC answers your FAQs about this potentially fatal condition

All Summer long, the ARL has been sharing advice during our TOO HOT FOR SPOT campaign on how to

heat stroke

Never leave your pet alone in a parked car on a warm day- even with the windows cracked. It’s just TOO HOT FOR SPOT!

keep your pet safe in the warmer months. This week, we focus on identifying the symptoms of, and how to prevent heat stroke in your pet.

When temperatures begin to rise, so do concerns about animal safety. Even when the thermometer dips below 80 degrees, the threat for heat stroke still exists. Fortunately, pet owners who take the proper precautions can greatly reduce the risks of this potentially fatal condition.

Want to learn more? Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) answers some of your most FAQs:

Q. What is heat stroke?

A. Heat stroke is a serious condition caused by your pet’s body overheating, usually as a result of prolonged exposure to or physical exertion in high temperatures. Immediate medical attention by a veterinarian is required.

Q. What makes cats and dogs susceptible to heat stroke?

A: Pets don’t sweat the way humans do, which makes them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat. If their core body temperature rises too high (typically 104 degrees or higher), they run the risk of going into shock or organ failure.

Q. Which symptoms should I look for when trying to diagnose heat stroke in my pet?

A: More obvious symptoms of potential heatstroke in cats and dogs include: difficulty breathing, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness. More subtle symptoms include: heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, excessive thirst, lethargy.

Q. Is there anything I can do until my pet receives medical attention?

A: While you wait for assistance, apply cool wet towels to the groin and “underarm” areas. If your pet is alert enough, try having them slowly sip cold water. Even if your pet begins to appear better or more alert, you should still make an emergency visit to your pet’s veterinarian as only they will be able to diagnose whether or not your pet is suffering from heat stroke.

Q. How can I protect my cat or dog from getting heat stroke altogether?

A: Prevention is always your best bet. On hot days, leave your pet at home in a cool humidity and temperature-regulated room and keep them hydrated with a bowl of cold water accessible at all times. If your pet must be outdoors, find a shady spot with ample air flow and limit exercise to the morning or evening hours when temperatures are at their coolest.

Finally, never leave your pet alone in a parked car—even with the air conditioner on or the windows cracked. On an 85 degree day, the temperature inside a car can rise above 100 degrees in less than 10 minutes, which is why it is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke. It’s just TOO HOT FOR SPOT!

If you suspect that your pet is suffering from heat stroke, seek immediate medical attention from a veterinarian.

For more warm weather pet safety tips, visit arlboston.org/summer-safety

 

Some July 4th Activities Can Be Too Hot for Spot

Keep your pup cool with these 5 safety tips and a DIY frozen treat

For humans across the United States, the Fourth of July signifies a time for family and friends, BBQs, beaches, and fireworks. For our canine friends, however, the holiday can be one of over-stimulation – too many people, too much sun, loud noises, and overwhelming smells.

This July 4th, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) want to remind you that the summer heat and bustle of the weekend’s festivities may be too stressful on your pup.

Keep your dog safe by following these 5 important tips:

  1. Leave your pup indoors in a small quiet cool room. Tuning on a TV or radio at a low volume can help detract from outside noises. Leave them free to roam around so that they don’t feel too confined.
  2. Always keep your canine on a leash or in a carrier if they must be outside. Set them up in a cool shady spot with ample air flow and plenty of fresh water.
  3. Keep your pooch away from potentially hazardous objects. Secure your pet a good distance from fireworks, sparklers, BBQs, and pools. Remember that some pets can become “fearfully aggressive” due to loud noises, so monitor them closely, especially around small children.
  4. Never leave your pup alone in a parked car if they must travel with you. On a hot day, the temperature inside a parked car can cause deadly heatstroke- even with the windows cracked.
  5. Make sure your dog’s microchip and ID tag information is current. Many animal shelters report increases of “stray” animals after July 4th due to the number of pets running away from the noise and excitement. Be sure your contact information is current and always on your pup’s collar to ensure an easy reunion should they be separated from you.

Your best bet? Leaving your dog at home is always the right decision for you and your pet. Prevention is responsible pet ownership.

Learn more at arlboston.org/summersafety

Want to keep your pup cool and occupied in the summer heat? Learn how to make this simple DIY frozen dog treat!

Press the “play” button below to watch this step-by-step video:

DIY summer dog treats

 

Summer Situations May Be TOO HOT FOR SPOT

The ARL shares advice all summer long on how to keep your pet safe in the warmer months

After a long [record-breaking] snowy Winter in New England, Summer is finally upon us! We’ve been waiting a long time for sunny and warm weather, so we’re all understandably eager to spend as much time as possible with our two-legged and four-legged family members and friends enjoying the outdoors.

Just as we humans protect ourselves from the sun and elements with sunscreen, hats, bug repellant, and staying hydrated in the hot sun, our pets need that kind of protection too.

it's too hot for spot to be alone in a parked car

Never leave your pet alone in a parked car on a warm day- even with the windows cracked. It’s just TOO HOT FOR SPOT!

When temperatures begin to rise, so do concerns about animal safety.

Even when temperatures dip below 80 degrees, the threat for heat stroke still exists. Remember that pets don’t sweat the way humans do, making them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat.

From July through September, our Too Hot For Spot public education campaign will offer a series of tips on how to keep your pet safe throughout the summer.

Keep your furry family members healthy by following these important basic guidelines:

  • Prevention is always your best bet. Whenever possible, leave your pet at home in a cool humidity- and temperature-regulated room.
  • If your pet must be outdoors, find a shady spot with ample air flow to prevent overheating.
  • Hydration is key. Keep a bowl of cold water accessible at all times.
  • Limit exercise to the morning or evening hours when temperatures are at their coolest.
  • Never leave your pet alone in a parked car—even with the air conditioner on or the windows cracked. On an 85 degree day, the temperature inside a car can rise above 100 degrees in less than 10 minutes, which is why it is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke. It’s just too hot for Spot!

If you suspect that your pet is suffering from heat stroke, seek immediate medical attention from a veterinarian.

Common symptoms of heatstroke in dogs and cats include: heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness.

For more warm weather pet safety tips, visit arlboston.org/summer-safety

 

Video, Photos & Quotes From “Too Hot for Spot” Campaign

Leaving a pet in a parked car can have dangerous consequences!

To raise awareness for this important summer pet safety issue, the Animal Rescue League of Boston, the Boston Fire Department, and Boston Veterinary Care ask media to share important information about the dangers of leaving pets in parked cars during the summer. Even when temperatures dip below 80, the threat for potentially fatal heat stroke still exists.

The following video and photos are from the ARL’s “Dangers of leaving a dog in a hot car ” media avail. For more information, please contact Ami Bowen, Director of Marketing and Communications, at abowen@arlboston.org or (617) 226-5668.

Media are invited to download the video clips for use in summer pet safety stories.

Please credit the Animal Rescue League of Boston for all content.

Video Links and Photos

VIDEO: Animal Rescue League of Boston “Too Hot for Spot” hot car rescue video

VIDEO: Brian O’Connor, ARL Rescue Services Manager, on how quickly temperatures rise in a parked car

VIDEO: Dennis Keeley, Boston Fire Department District Chief, on how fire department rescues an animal from a parked car

VIDEO: Dr. Edward Schettino, Boston Veterinary Care, on how dangers of heatstroke in pets

PHOTO: Brian O’Connor, ARL Rescue Services Manager, explains the dangers of leaving a pet in a parked car on a hot day

PHOTO: The ARL has focused its summer campaign, “Too Hot for Spot” on raising awareness about the dangers of leaving a pet in a parked car

PHOTO: Dr. Edward Schettino, Boston Veterinary Care, explains that pets can easily suffer heatstroke when left in a parked car.

Additional Quotes

 Mary Nee, president of the Animal Rescue League of Boston:
“We live for the summers in New England. We want to be outside and do more things, and we want our dogs to be part of the fun.  We need to keep in mind what’s fun for us, might actually cause discomfort and injury to our much-loved pet.”

“Leaving your dog at home as you head out for summer activities and events is the best thing for you and your pet.  Prevention is responsible pet ownership.”

Dr. Rashel Shophet-Ratner, veterinarian at Boston Veterinary Care:
“On an 85 degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can top one hundred degrees in less than 10 minutes – even with all the windows cracked.  That’s why leaving a pet inside a parked car is the most common cause of potentially deadly heat stroke.”


Find More Information

Visit arlboston.org/summer-safety for tips about treating heatstroke, keeping your pet calm during a thunderstorm or safe during a house fire, and other advice from the ARL and BVC.

###