ARL Issues Call-to-Action to Prevent Animal Cruelty

Provides 7 warning signs as part of “See Something, Say Something” campaign

FOR MEDIA USE:

ARL See Something Say Something Take Action Card

ARL See Something Say Something Take Action Card

Boston, MA – The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) wants to help the public better understand the importance of reporting suspected animal cruelty to local authorities. Throughout October, the ARL’s “See Something, Say Something – Report Animal Cruelty,” campaign will emphasize the critical role public awareness and action plays in prevention.

“All too often, animal cruelty remains undiscovered,” explains Mary Nee, president of ARL. “By many estimates, four out of five cases remain concealed from authorities. We very much need the public’s help in bringing concerns about neglect or abuse forward to law enforcement at the community level.”

According to the National Link Coalition, a strong connection exists between animal abuse and other forms of family and community violence. Law enforcement agencies including the International Association of Chiefs of Police have also expressed concern about the relationship between animal cruelty, domestic violence, child and elder abuse, and other violent crimes.

“Breaking the self-perpetuating cycle of violence, protecting animals, and creating safe, humane communities has to be a priority for us all,” adds Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, vice president of animal welfare at the ARL.

While most members of the public recognize that punching, kicking, burning, choking, or hitting an animal with an object are acts of animal cruelty, there are also more subtle signs to watch for that could indicate mistreatment, neglect, or abuse.

To help the public better understand the issue, the ARL offers 7 warning signs of animal cruelty:

  1. Howling or barking for a sustained period of time or hearing an animal cry in pain with higher pitched, more persistent vocal sounds than usual
  2. Singed, matted, chronically or excessively dirty hair or fur
  3. Wounds, unusual scars, hair loss, frequent limping often on different legs, or signs of improper nutrition such as weight loss or prominent visible ribs
  4. Animals kept caged or tied with little room to move for long periods of time or without regular interaction with people
  5. Lack of protection from the weather or fece- or debris-strewn living areas for animals
  6. Collars, leashes, or halters so tight they visibly dig into the animal’s face or neck
  7. A large number of animals coming or going from a property

If you know or suspect animal cruelty, Nee says contact your local authorities as quickly as possible: “We can all give a voice to victims of animal cruelty if, when we see something, we say something to local law enforcement.”

Visit an ARL animal shelter in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham to pick-up a “See Something, Say Something” emergency contact card. Learn more about preventing animal cruelty at arlboston.org/take-action.

About the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Founded in 1899, the ARL is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect. In 2013, the ARL served over 14,000 individual animals through our shelters in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham, and our law enforcement, rescue, and veterinary services. The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.

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