Still Need a Gift for the Animal-Lover on Your List?

If you have a few people on your holiday gift-giving list for whom you haven’t quite found that special something yet, there’s no need to fight the deal-hunting, post-holiday shopping crowds at the mall or scour the internet looking for the best price.

For the animal-lover on your list, why not make a gift donation to the ARL?

Middleboropuppies

After several weeks with dedicated ARL foster volunteers, Franny and Tuukka (pictured above) along with all of their siblings went home for the holidays with loving families. (photo credit: Amelia Hughes)

You can make a donation on behalf of a colleague, friend or family member by following these simple steps:

  • Click here or on the green button “DONATE” button in the upper right corner of this page
  • Fill in the information on the donation form
  • Click “I would like to make a tribute”at the bottom of the form
  • Select “In honor of” if you are making a gift donation
  • If you would like the ARL to notify your gift recipient that a gift was made in his/her honor, fill in contact information as requested

Last year, donations to the ARL helped 3,000 homeless animals find permanent homes, and another 1,000 recuperate and re-acclimate in foster homes.  Animals like Franny and Tuukka, two of the 13 Middleboro puppies found living in cruel conditions during a drug raid.

Give a truly meaningful gift that helps deserving animals in our communities get the care they need all year-long!

 

Animal Rescue League of Boston Shares Happy Update on Oliver Twist

Severely emaciated puppy discovered by kind FedEx driver is home for holidays

Boston, MA – This past April, a kind FedEx driver named Jeff called the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) after spotting a severely emaciated puppy shivering in the cold and wandering the streets along his delivery route.  The ARL’s Rescue Services Team immediately responded to the call, and were stunned by what they found.

“We could see his bones jutting through his skin,” describes Danielle Genter, senior rescue technician at the ARL. “When we found him, he just stumbled over to us.”

oliver4

When the ARL’s Rescue Service Team first saw Oliver Twist, they were stunned by his severely emaciated condition.

At the ARL’s Boston adoption center, the frail little pup received immediate medical attention along with the name Oliver Twist. On the Purina body condition scale a score of “9” is considered obese and “1” is extremely lean; Oliver scored less than 1. He was also diagnosed with a bacterial infection.

Over the next few weeks, Oliver’s condition stabilized. He was placed on a progressive re-feeding schedule and soon began to eat on his own. ARL veterinarians checked him daily to ensure that he was gaining the expected amount of weight and treated his infection. He also received lots of love and attention from adoption center staff.

The ARL’s Center for Animal Protection put out requests for information to identify who so severely neglected Oliver. To date, however, a suspect has not been found.

With special care and attention, Oliver was ready for a home just a few weeks after his rescue.   After seeing Oliver’ story on the news, Billie Jean Nebesky and her daughter felt an instant connection with him. “We knew he needed us and we needed him,” said Nebesky.

They adopted him at the end of April and happily report that today, he has made himself completely at home for the holidays.

Oliver twist with stick in new home

Today, Oliver Twist is happy and healthy. He especially loves to fetch sticks in the woods near his home.

“If we sit down in a chair, Oliver will immediately join you and cuddle,” smiles his new mom. “He clearly knows he is part of our family.”

To learn more about other animals like Oliver Twist who are home for the holidays after recovering from cruelty and neglect, visit arlboston.org/take-action/#BeforeAfterSlideshow

About the Animal Rescue League of Boston
Founded in 1899, the Animal Rescue League of Boston is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect. The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.

At the beginning of December, the ARL launched “Home for the Holidays,” a month-long community outreach campaign to encourage adoption and support for shelter animals. By featuring stories of animals rescued from cruel conditions, now recovered and living happy lives, as well as animals available for adoption, the ARL hopes to find more animals a home this holiday season.

To learn more about the ARL’s “Home for the Holidays” visit arlboston.org/homeforholidays2013.

 ###

 

 

Littlest of the Middleboro Puppies Goes Home for the Holidays Today

ARL reports Babybel has recovered from cruel conditions and looking forward to romping in the snow 

Media Avail
1:30 PM, Friday, December 13, 2013
ARL’s Dedham Adoption Center
55 Anna’s Place, Dedham, MA

Dedham, MA –Life is looking very merry and bright indeed this holiday season for Babybel, the tiniest of the 13 puppies found jammed into a crate during a SWAT team raid at a home in Middleboro earlier in October.

The 5-week-old puppies were covered in filth, emaciated, and dehydrated, and according to the director of the Animal Rescue League (ARL) of Boston’s Center for Animal Protection, Lt. Alan Borgal, they had clearly been living in cruel conditions.

baby bel then

Babybel, pictured above, remained under the care of a local veterinarian in the first few days after police discovered her jammed in a crate with her 12 siblings.

The local veterinarian who provided urgent care after their rescue described Babybel and her siblings as “little bone racks,” and reported they each weighed in at 2 pounds or less. He believed sickly Babybel wouldn’t have made it through another night if authorities hadn’t found her.

Too frail to travel, she remained under the care of the local veterinarian until she could join her siblings at the ARL’s adoption center in Dedham a few days later. Because she needed more one-on-one care to heal and develop physically and socially, Babybel went to a dedicated ARL foster volunteer to get the special attention and training she needed.

In just a few short weeks, Babybel has grown by leaps and bounds. Her foster mom provided details on her personality and habits so the staff at the Dedham adoption center could find her a safe and loving home.

Now recovered from cruel conditions, today Babybel goes home for the holidays with her new family.

To learn more about the Middleboro puppies rescue and recovery, visit arlboston.org/middleboro-puppies-are-home-for-the-holidays.

About the Animal Rescue League
Founded in 1899, the Animal Rescue League of Boston is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect. The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.

The ARL launched “Home for the Holidays,” a month-long community outreach campaign in December to encourage adoption and support for shelter animals. By featuring stories of animals rescued from cruel conditions, now recovered and living happy lives, as well as animals available for adoption, the ARL hopes to find more animals a home this holiday season.

To learn more about the ARL’s “Home for the Holidays” visit arlboston.org/homeforholidays2013.

 

Animal Rescue League of Boston Has Kittens and Cats in Need Who’re Purrfect Indeed

Mild fall contributing to overlap of the kitten and holiday seasons, says the ARL

Boston, MA – The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) reports a sudden burst in the number of kittens coming into the Boston Adoption Center, located at 10 Chandler Street in the South End. In the past few days, a total of seven different litters of kittens have come in from the cold, an unusually large number for this time of year.

Adoption center staff suspect the mild fall contributed to an extended kitten season this year.

“It’s not unheard of to have this many kittens in December, but it’s not something we typically see,” explains Carolyn Curran, assistant shelter manager. “It stayed warm well into November this year, which means cats stayed ‘out on the prowl’ longer.”

Hidari needs home for holidays

Hidari is one of many adult cats at the ARL’s Boston Adoption Center looking for a home for the holidays.

Curran says the Adoption Center generally has an easy time finding safe and happy homes for kittens, especially when they are as cute and fuzzy as these 15 little ones. Unfortunately, the sudden influx of kittens means adult cats like Hidari, a sweet and affectionate 7-year old gray short hair cat who arrived at the Boston Adoption center in mid-October, may have to wait longer for a home for the holidays.

Earlier this week, an anonymous donor sponsored the adoption fees on Hidari and 10 other cats over the age of 7 at the ARL’s three adoption center locations in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham to encourage families to open their hearts to an adult cat.

According to Curran, “a curious and high-energy kitten who just wants to play may not be the best fit for every family. A calm, affectionate adult cat who just wants to curl up on the couch with you may actually be the best match if you’re looking for an animal companion.”

To learn more about all the animals looking for a home for the holidays, visit arlboston.org/search-adoptables.

About the Animal Rescue League
Founded in 1899, the Animal Rescue League of Boston is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect. The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.

The ARL launched “Home for the Holidays,” a month-long community outreach campaign in December to encourage adoption and support for shelter animals. By featuring stories of animals rescued from cruel conditions, now recovered and living happy lives, as well as animals available for adoption, the ARL hopes to find more animals a home this holiday season.

To learn more about the ARL’s “Home for the Holidays” visit arlboston.org/homeforholidays2013.

 

 

 

Rudolph Resting Comfortably at ARL’s Boston Adoption Center

After a tough morning commute, Rudolph, the dog rescued by MBTA Transit police officer after a concerned citizen spotted him roaming the commuter rail tracks between the Savin Hill and JFK-UMass stations, is resting comfortably at the ARL’s Boston adoption center.

Rudolph takes a nap at our shelter after his exhausting day.

Rudolph takes a nap at our shelter after his exhausting day.

The ARL’s Rescue Services team responded to a call from the MBTA and brought Rudolph to the Boston adoption center for a medical evaluation. He received vaccines and some much need r&r after such a tough morning.

“Rudolph is a sweet dog who has the quick actions of transit police to thank for getting him out of a very dangerous situation,” explains Danielle Genter, senior rescue technician at the ARL. “We’re very happy we were there to answer the call to provide care and shelter for him.”

According to the MBTA Transit Police, at approximately 10:00 am on December 9, a concerned citizen approached MBTA Transit Police Officer Murawski-Dupont at the Savin Hill station after spotting a pit bull roaming the commuter rail tracks between Savin Hill and JFK-UMass stations.

If you recognize Rudolph, please contact the Transit Police Special Crimes Unit at (617) 222-1170 or text any information (anonymously) to 873873 or call the ARL at (617) 426-9170

 

 

The Animal Rescue League of Boston Wants Animals Home for the Holidays

Launches community outreach campaign aimed at finding more animals a home this holiday season

Boston, MA – Today, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) kicked off “Home for the Holidays,” a month-long community outreach campaign to encourage adoption and support for shelter animals. By featuring stories of animals rescued from cruel conditions, now recovered and living happy lives, as well as animals available for adoption, the ARL hopes to find more animals a home this holiday season.

“This is the time of year when we especially want to give every animal in our care the opportunity to experience joy and companionship. After all, it’s what the holidays are all about,” says Mary Nee, president of the ARL.

10-18 Middleboro Puppies Update_thumb

Franny and Tuukka, two of the 13 puppies found living in cruel conditions in Middleboro, received special care from the ARL and are now home for the holidays. (photo credit: Amelia Hughes)

Every year the organization unites over 3,000 deserving animals from adoption centers in Boston, Dedham, and Brewster with loving human companions. Another 1,100 find foster homes with dedicated ARL volunteers, including the 13 puppies rescued earlier this fall during a SWAT team raid at a home in Middleboro, Massachusetts.

Found jammed into a crate, the 5-week old puppies were covered in filth, emaciated, and dehydrated. According to the director of the ARL’s Center for Animal Protection, Lt. Alan Borgal, they had clearly been living in cruel conditions.

Because they needed more one-on-one care to heal and develop physically and socially, the puppies went to dedicated ARL foster volunteers to get the special attention and training they needed. In just a few short weeks, the puppies had grown by leaps and bounds and today, Timmy, Sammy, Franny, Tuukka, Grunt, Moose, Honey, Shamus, Bleu, Cheddar, Colby, Brie, and BabyBel all have a home for the holidays.

“The happiest part of the work we do all year is bringing animals like the Middleboro puppies and people together,” explains Nee. “Our biggest holiday wish is for the animals in our care and families willing to open their hearts to find each other.”

To learn more about the ARL’s “Home for the Holidays” visit arlboston.org/homeforholidays2013.

About the Animal Rescue League
Founded in 1899, the Animal Rescue League of Boston is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect. The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.

Media Contact
Ami Bowen, Director of Marketing and Communications
(617) 226-5668
abowen@arlboston.org
Photos of Middleboro puppies available on request

 

Animal Rescue League of Boston Gives a Helping Hand This GivingTuesday 12/3

Organization pledges to raise $5K for Alice T. Whitney Helping Hand Fund on annual day of giving

Boston, MA – The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) hopes to raise $5,000 for the organization’s Alice T. Whitney Helping Hand Fund this #GivingTuesday, December 3. The ARL is one of the 10,000 charities, companies, families, and individuals participating in GivingTuesday 2013 to encourage generosity and charitable activities in support of non-profit organizations.

The ARL’s Alice T. Whitney Helping Hand Fund provides financial assistance to families with limited economic means in veterinary emergencies. According to Mary Nee, president of the ARL, more than 360 pets have received critical care that their owners could not afford without support from the Helping Hand Fund.  The need continues to grow, she says.

“Unexpected veterinary care—particularly in emergency situations—can come at a cost that’s out of reach for an increasing number of families in this economy,” explains Mary Nee, president of the ARL.

photo 1

Foxy received life-saving veterinary care thanks to the Alice T. Whitney Helping Hand Fund.

After her beloved family dog Foxy accidentally got hit by a car, for example, Candace Rivera rushed her petite 4-year-old Chihuahua to the veterinarian. Her family had fallen on hard times financially and she couldn’t afford the surgery and rehabilitation Foxy needed to survive.

For the Johnsons, news about their indoor cat Fred wasn’t much better. After sneaking out of the house, Fred was somehow seriously injured. X-rays done by their local veterinarian revealed Fred had a broken jaw. Unfortunately, Mrs. Johnson had just lost her job and the family did not have the resources for the further treatment he needed.

Luckily for these families and their pets, friends directed them to the ARL and the Alice T. Whitney Helping Hand Fund.

“The Alice T. Whitney Helping Hand Fund was established to ensure limited economic means didn’t prevent caring owners like the Riveras and Johnsons from providing vital care for their pets in treatable medical emergencies,” says Nee.

To learn more about and give to the Alice T. Whitney Helping Hand Fund on GivingTuesday, visit arlboston.org/givingtuesday2013.

About the Animal Rescue League
Founded in 1899, the Animal Rescue League of Boston is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect. The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.

 

 

Community Rescue Effort Brings Stray Dog in from the Cold

Just before the Thanksgiving holiday, a 6-month-long effort to rescue a stray dog named Isa finally succeeded in bringing her in from the cold.

Isa first came to Massachusetts through the Save a Sato program, which transports homeless dogs from Puerto Rico for adoption in other regions of the U.S.  She accidentaly escaped from her owner in June near Breakheart Reservations and was subsequently spotted wandering in Saugus, Stoneham, and Wakefield.

The ARL’s Center for Animal Protection first received a call about Isa during the summer from Granite State Dog Recovery (GDSR), an all-volunteer group dedicated to reuniting lost dogs with their owners in New Hampshire.  GDSR works in partnership with other animal welfare organizations and local authorities in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, and calls on the ARL for help with challenging rescues like Isa’s.

And Isa was most definitely a challenge!  

Isa captured at last

A dedicated community effort persevered for 6 months until Isa was finally brought in from the cold just before Thanksgiving.

The very frightened and confused dog would instantly run in the opposite direction when approached by people.  Until she narrowed the territory she covered as she wandered through the woods, setting up a humane trap proved next to impossible.

When she did finally begin to stay within one area, Isa wouldn’t go near the conventional humane box trap often used to capture an animal for relocation or medical treatment.  The ARL brought in a more advanced drop net trap, but then poor Isa ran into the side of a passing car.

She was almost knocked out, but managed to escape back into the woods before rescuers could get to the accident scene.

“In order to capture a dog like Isa, you need to establish a routine feeding station before setting up humane traps, especially the drop net,” explains Lt. Alan Borgal, director of the ARL’s Center for Animal Protection.  “When Isa got hit by a car, the whole feeding station process had to start all over again.”

Lucky for Isa, her rescuers were not about to give up on her.  The ARL’s Rescue Services Team and GSDR volunteers persevered and at last their patience paid off— Isa wandered into the humane drop net trap.

True to form, she tried her best to escape, but ARL rescue technician Mark Vogel, reacted quickly.

“I ran around to head off Isa, who almost made her way out of the netting. I was able to get the net and a sliplead over her. I got a restraint pole on her and it was over,” smiles Vogel, “Isa, who had been out since June, had finally been caught.”

She immediately went to a local veterinarian who remove 80 ticks and gave her a warm medicated bath.  We’re very happy to report that Isa is enjoying her fair share of Thanksgiving leftovers this weekend, along with the warmth and love of nearby human companions in a foster home.

Thank you to everyone who was part of such an amazingly dedicated community effort to rescue Isa!

 

Puppy Doe Update: Date Set for Suspect’s Next Court Appearance

Norfolk County District Attorney Michael Morrissey announced the arraignment of the suspect in the Puppy Doe abuse case  is scheduled for December 19 at 2 pm in Norfolk Superior Court.

Late last week, the Norfolk County Grand Jury handed down 12 indictments for animal abuse and one indictment for misleading police in the on-going investigation of the suspect.  Those indictments moved the case from Quincy District Court to Norfolk Superior Court.

As reported on Boston.com, the move from District to Superior Court means that if convicted, the suspect could face a sentence of up to 5 years per count in state prison.  District Court can only impose a maximum sentence of two and half years in a county House of Correction.

Like you, we will continue to closely follow criminal proceedings against the suspect.   To learn more about what you can do to prevent future case of animal abuse, visit arlboston.org/take-action.

5 Thanksgiving Foods to Keep Off Your Dog’s Menu

Animal Rescue League of Boston offers ideas for keeping your canine companion healthy and happy this Turkey Day

Boston, MA–Few holidays are as food-focused as Thanksgiving. From the turkey to the trimmings to the pumpkin pie, sharing a celebratory meal with family and friends is the culinary highlight of the fall season.

For many of us, including our dogs in holiday meal plans goes without saying.  According to the Animal Rescue League’s behavior counselor Kim Melanson, CPDT-KA, however, many Thanksgiving staples can actually be very dangerous for your pet.

“Tasty and safe f11-25 Thanksgiving Foods Photoor you does not equal tasty and safe for you dog,” she explains.

Here are five Thanksgiving foods the ARL says leave off your dog’s holiday menu:

 1. Turkey Bones. We’ve grown accustomed to the idea of “giving the dog a bone,” but turkey bones are small and can become lodged in your dog’s throat, stomach, or intestinal tract.

Additionally, these bones may splinter and cause severe damage to the stomach and could puncture the small intestine.

 2. Fat Trimmings. Fatty meat, especially turkey skin may be the tastiest part, but it’s also very dangerous for your pet. Fatty foods like turkey skin and gravy are difficult for dogs to digest and consuming turkey skin can result in pancreatitis.

Symptoms for this serious disease include vomiting, extreme depression, reluctance to move and abdominal pain.

 3. Dough/Cake Batter. If your mother ever told you not to eat the cookie dough, she wasn’t just trying to make sure you didn’t spoil your appetite.

Since dough and cake batter contain raw eggs, the first concern for people and pets is salmonella bacteria. What’s more, dough may actually rise in your dog’s belly. This can lead to vomiting, severe abdominal pain, and bloating.

 4. Raisins/Grapes: Grapes commonly make the list of foods dogs should avoid, but we like to remind people that they are very dangerous. Though the causes of their toxicity are unknown, ingesting them can cause kidney failure.

 5. Mushrooms: Good for you, not for your dog. Mushrooms can damage your dog’s internal organs, including kidneys, liver, and the central nervous system. If your dog does eat mushrooms, you can expect the following symptoms: seizures, coma, vomiting and possibly death.

Melanson suggests giving your dog special treats and chews as an alternative to human fare. “Offer him good-for-doggie treats or stuff a Kong with his or her favorite wet food, peanut butter, or low-fat yogurt.”

Need to keep your canine pal busy while you’re busy in the kitchen or entertaining?

“Food puzzles and interactive toys like Kongs or Buster Cubes are a great way to entertain your dog when you’re busy and distracted getting the turkey in and out of the oven,” says Melanson.

For more helpful tips about dog and cat health and behavior, visit arlboston.org/helpfultips

About the Animal Rescue League

Founded in 1899, the Animal Rescue League of Boston is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from cruelty, abandonment, and neglect.  The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.