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Articles Tagged with: Dogs
Look for the ARL at Fenway Park this Sunday

For the Second Year in a Row, the ARL will be at Futures at Fenway with Adoptable Dogs

07-11-14 Dog at Fenway PicWe’re excited to be invited back to Fenway Park this year for their Futures at Fenway event tomorrow.

It’s great day of baseball action featuring Red Sox prospects and lots of family fun.

The first 25 people to stop by the ARL table and take a photo in front of our ARL Super Pets backdrop using #ARLSuperPets will receive a free ARL doggie poopbag dispenser.

After the success of last year’s event, the dogs will once again be returning to Fenway Park. Designated sections of the seating bowl will be available to owners and their dogs.  All dog owners must print out the waiver, complete it and bring it with them to gain admission to Fenway Park on July 13.

Tickets are $15, $20 if you bring your dog!

After the game, stay for a special 25th Anniversary showing of the iconic classic baseball movie, Field of Dreams. The movie will start approximately 30 minutes after the conclusion of the game.

For more information visit: boston.redsox.mlb.com/bos/ticketing/futures_at_fenway.jsp

07-11-14 Dog at Fenway Pic 2

 

 


Change Underway at BAC Shelter Facility

Mayor Walsh taking action, ARL supporting efforts

Camilla upon arriving at the ARL.

Camilla seen here soon after arriving at the ARL’s Boston shelter.

As reported in the Boston Globe this morning, Mayor Walsh is taking action to address the situation at the Boston Animal Control (BAC) shelter facility in Roslindale.

At the end of June, the ARL visited the BAC facility to meet four dogs connected to a law enforcement case that had just concluded. We hoped to help the dogs find new homes now that the case was over.

When our staff arrived, one of the dogs from the case, Camilla (pictured right), appeared very emaciated with sores on her body. Her condition and other observations made by our staff while at the facility raised so many concerns, we brought them to the immediate attention of Mayor Walsh.

Camilla, seen here after her first bath at our Boston shelter, has become a staff-favorite.

Camilla, seen here after her first bath at our Boston shelter, has become a staff-favorite.

We have continued to support the Mayor’s efforts to help the animals currently at the BAC facility and evaluate all areas of the shelter’s operations.

The ARL has taken in 35 animals from the BAC facility at our shelters in Boston and Dedham.  At the Mayor’s request, a team of ARL veterinarians and shelter operations staff also did a comprehensive on-site assessment. We plan to provide a full report of findings to the Mayor next week.

Thanks to Mayor Walsh and the supporting efforts of our colleagues, we truly believe a change is underway at the BAC facility—a change which will have an immediate positive effect for the animals there now and for many years to come.

hanks to proper care, nutrition, and extra attention, Camilla has gained 9 pounds.

Thanks to proper care, nutrition, and extra attention, Camilla has already gained 9 pounds.

Everyone at the ARL is honored to be part of making a difference for animals and the City of Boston today.

 


Thank You Thursday: Stop to Smell the Roses at our Brewster Shelter

Volunteer Donates Garden to Brewster Shelter

Things are looking a lot more vibrant around the ARL’s Brewster shelter, thanks to one very talented volunteer and some generous Cape Cod businesses and individuals.

Donelle Denery, a master gardener and ARL volunteer, orchestrated a new garden outside our Brewster shelter.  This Orleans resident has been volunteering with us for almost two years and we really appreciate all of her dedication.

She coordinated with local businesses about donating supplies including, plants, flowers, mulch, compost and fertilizer and then she went to work to create this beautiful outdoor masterpiece! We are all enjoying this lovely addition to the landscaping around the shelter and even the pups are stopping to smell the flowers!

Thank you to Donelle and everyone who donated supplies including:

  • Daniels Recycling Co. –  Flip
  • TruValue Hardware – Jim Moran
  • Orleans Agway- Justin and Jennifer
  • The Farm – Sassy Richardson
  • Snow`s – Susan Snow
  • Irene Cooper

07-09-14 Thank You Brewster Flower Pic


How to Calm Your Dog During a Thunderstorm

Too Hot for Spot Tuesday Tip: Thunderstorm Dog Safety

If you’re like some dog owners, you’ve probably had several sleepless nights over the last week thanks to your dog’s “thunder phobia” resulting from the severe thunderstorms that have been plaguing the Northeast.

This fear can manifest in a variety of ways including – hiding, whining, scratching, slobbering, or destructive behavior – and it can get worse with age. Dogs possess special sensitivities that can make storms more terrifying. They can sense the change in air pressure, and may hear low-frequency rumblings that we, humans, can’t detect. 

07-08-14 Too Hot for Spot Tuesday- Thunderstorms Pic07-08-14 Thunderstorms PicSo, if you want to help calm your pup (and hopefully get some “shut-eye”) during the next thunderstorm, try these 5 tips:

  1. Stay with your dog if you can. Having you by his side will make him feel safer.
  2. If there are windows in the room, close the blinds or curtains, or cover the windows so the dog can’t see outside.
  3. Create a safe haven. Hiding is a natural instinct, so provide your dog with a safe indoor area, like a crate. If you have a wire crate, cover it with a light sheet. Leave the door open so your dog doesn’t feel trapped.
  4. Play calming music to drown out the thunder.
  5. Distract your dog. Try playing his favorite game and giving him treats. He might learn to associate storms with fun and play, rather than anxiety and fear.

If none of these work and your dog’s “thunder phobia” is really out of control, consult with your veterinarian.

For more summer pet safety tips visit: arlboston.org/summer-safety.

 


Rugby Update: Parade Goers Adopted this Playful Pup

Rugby is Settling into a New Home!

Rugby at the Boston Pride parade.

Rugby at the Boston Pride parade.

Rugby clearly made an impact at the Boston Pride Parade. When parade goers Maddy and Pam saw him marching with the ARL on June 14, it was love at first sight! They immediately contacted our Boston shelter about adopting him and he went home last week. Our Boston shelter supervisor, Naomi Johnson, said his new family is “dedicated to giving Rugby what he needs to thrive.”

When Rugby first arrived at the ARL his front legs were so severely twisted that he could barely walk. Thanks to a lot of TLC and very specialized therapy regimen, he has made enormous progress.

Read Rugby’s story.

We knew this amazing puppy would need a special home that could give him the attention that he needs and we’re absolutely thrilled that he found himself a great home with new canine and feline siblings and a large back yard to romp around in!

Rugby snuggling with his new brother.

Rugby snuggling with his new brother.

Maddy and Pam said that Rugby loves playing with his new 10-year-old canine brother, Tito and they’re having a fantastic time together.

Rugby is adjusting well and is starting his first day of puppy day care today. Good luck on your first day of “school” Rugby!

Everyone here at the ARL could not be happier for Rugby and his new family! We’d like to thank all of the staff, volunteers, and Dr. Alett Mekler and the physical therapists at Animotion in Stoughton, Massachusetts, who donated their time and services to help with his rehabilitation!

On his second day in his new home, Rugby got a pool!

On his second day in his new home, Rugby got a pool!

 

 


Meet Rugby!

A real miracle puppy ready to find a new home

“Rugby’s story highlights all the wonderful people in the ARL network who are dedicated to helping neglected animals.”
– Dr. Edward Schettino, Director of Veterinary Medical Services, ARL

When we first met Rugby back in April, he could have been the poster child for our “See Something, Say Something: Report Animal Cruelty,” campaign running that month.

At the time, he was 4 1/2 months old and had been cruelly abandoned in the middle of the road in Fitchburg, Massachusetts.  His front legs were severely twisted at the wrists, so Rugby could only get around by doing a haphazard crawl.  Thankfully, someone reported spotting Rugby inching his way along the road where he’d been left, and Lt. Alan Borgal, director of the ARL’s Center for Animal Protection, brought him to the ARL’s Boston Shelter.

When Dr. Edward Schettino, the ARL’s director of veterinary medical services, examined Rugby at the shelter, he observed the spirited young dog was very underweight.  Dr. Schettino concluded the condition of Rugby’s front legs was probably due to poor nutrition and long-term confinement to a very small crate.  After reviewing x-rays of Rugby’s front legs with his colleagues, Dr. Schettino preliminarily diagnosed Rugby with bilateral carpal laxity syndrome, a condition that could require surgery or could also respond to a diet of well-balanced adult dog-food and a program of rigorous exercise.

Rugby Licking His NoseRigorous exercise seemed to be the best course of treatment for Rugby!  A rambunctious dog, Rugby already had ARL behaviorists, staff,  and trained volunteers working with him to help him channel his energies into playing with other dogs and chew toys.

And getting him moving helped on the medical and behavioral front indeed!

Within a few weeks, Rugby’s front legs were improving.  The ARL collaborated on his treatment with colleagues at the ARL and Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.  To increase strength in his legs, Rugby began underwater treadmill therapy twice a week, under the supervision of the ARL’s Dr. Alett Mekler and the physical therapists at Animotion in Stoughton, Massachusetts, who donated their time and services.

Watch more videos of Rugby.

06-10-14 Rugby & Schettino PicIn just under three months, Rugby has come incredibly far in his rehabilitation.  He is moving well on his front legs and his sweet, playful personality makes everyone at the shelter smile–even when he’s a bit of a handful (written with love and a smile, of course).

Thanks to the collaborative effort of our Center for Animal Protection, shelter veterinarians, dog behaviorists, shelter staff, volunteers, Tufts University Cummings School, and Animotion, this miracle puppy is now ready for a new home!

According to shelter staff, an experienced dog owner preferably with another dog would be the best situation for Rugby–the guy really needs a playmate to keep him on his toes and moving!  He’s still working on his jumpy/mouthy behavior, so an active household with older children would be more suited to his big personality and energy-level.

View Rugby’s adoption profile.

Stay tuned for further updates about his progress!

 


Thank You Thursday: Paws in the Park, a Huge Success

Thank You To Everyone Who Made Paws in the Park 2014 Possible!

This past Saturday over 1,000 people and hundreds of dogs joined the ARL in Brewster, MA for Paws in the Park. The day was beautiful. The venue, Drummer Boy Park, was fabulous. The vendors, contests, performers and DJs were all awesome. We couldn’t have asked for anything more.

A great time was had by all and we hope this will be a new “thing to do” to kick off the summer with your dog on the Cape.

Many thanks to the ARL staff and Marci Tyldesley who organized the event and worked so hard to make everything run smoothly.

Supporting our team was a great crew of Cape volunteers including, Jeanie Handren, Rich Tyldesley, Paul Kelleher, “Sully” Sullivan, David Chandler, Jack Bakker, Joyce Bakker, Diane Cullen, Lorraine Janusas, Mary Utt, Dorothy Becker, Liz Hines, Diane Johnson, Donelle Donnery, Diane Foster, Bradley Fowler, Justine Pitt and Stacey Hedman of Cold Nose Photography.

Thanks again to everyone who joined us for a great cause with a terrific outcome.

One more round of thanks for our event sponsors who are listed below!

Paws in Park Logo Combo


One Week Until Paws in the Park!

Kick-off the Summer with the ARL & Your Pup!

There’s just one more week until Paws in the Park! We hope you’ll join us for one of the largest pet festivals on Cape Cod. The event, which takes place on Saturday, May 31 from 11am-2pm will benefit the ARL’s Brewster shelter and promises fun for your whole family, including your pup!

The first 400 people will receive a free swag bag filled with goodies for you and your pet, so don’t forget to set your alarm!

We’d like to extend a big thank you to presenting sponsor Nauset Pet Services, who is the title sponsor for the 4th consecutive year.

$3 admission fee for adults, FREE for children 12 years and under.

Thanks to very gracious donors we have some fantastic raffle prizes for you. Tickets are $2 per raffle ticket and winners will be drawn at 1:45pm. If you have to leave early, don’t worry, you don’t need to be present to win! See what you could win below:

  • One night stay at the Seaport Hotel in Boston
  • Photo 7$100 Gift Certificate to Ark Angel Animal Hospital
  • $100 Gift Card to Addison Art Gallery
  • Two $50 Gift Cards to Arnold’s Clam Shack with mini golf passes (2 separate prizes)
  • $50 Gift Card to Laurino’s Tavern
  • $25 Gift Card to Zia Pizzeria
  • Gift Certificate to Brax Landing
  • Gift certificate for a Dolphin Fleet Whale Watch and a canvas whale tote from The Brewster Stitch
  • Dinner for two at Pisces of Chatham
  • Dinner for four at The Chatham Squire
  • Wine Lover’s Package  – Case of Joseph Carr Wines, 4 custom wine glasses from Cape Cod Glass Designs and a $25 gift card to Main Street Wine & Gourmet 
  • A Year’s Supply of Treats from Blue Dog Bakery
  • Photo Session for your dog with Cold Nose Photo
  • Framed autographed photo, used stick shaft and net from Boston Bruins player Brad Marchand
  • Gift basket from The Honest Kitchen
  • Gift basket from Lower Cape Veterinary Services
  • Gift Basket from The Cape Cod Dog
  • Small Dog Gift Basket from Agway of Cape Cod
  • Large Dog Gift Basket from Agway of Cape Cod
  • 5 Blow-n-Bubbles Self-Serve Dog Washes at Hot Diggity Dog Wash (5 winners)
  • Stroller for small dog
  • “Paws in the Park” cornhole set by Cape Cod Cornholes donated by Agway
  • ARL Emergency Backpack Kit for Dog
  • ARL Emergency Backpack Kit for Cat

Pet of the Week: Nicki, a Hound with a Big Heart

 Meet Nicki!

05-23-14 Nicki PhotoNicki is a sweet 7-year-old Bluetick hound mix who’s been waiting for a furever home for just over a month. She loves to go outside for walks and is very well-behaved on leash. She’s also very smart and will gladly give paw and play fetch.

Like all hounds, Nicki has a passion for sniffing! The moment she’s out the door, her nose is to the ground and she turns into Nicki the hound detective – investigating any scent she comes across!

She is a very friendly dog who warms up quickly, especially if you have treats!

Because Nicki doesn’t always like to share her things, she would do best in a home as the only pet with no small children.

Nicki would like nothing more than to come home with you this weekend!

Read Nicki’s online adoption profile.

If Nicki sounds like the dog for you, come meet her at our Boston shelter. Or if you know someone who’d make the perfect match,  share her  information via social media and help her find a home.

05-23-14 Nicki Paw Photo

Nicki showing her “give paw” skills.


Dog Bite-Related Fatalities: Research Challenges Conventional Wisdom

It’s National Dog Bite Prevention Week.

dr amy-marder-photoNational Dog Bite Prevention Week allows us the opportunity to share some of the impressive findings that have resulted from a study by the ARL’s Center for Shelter Dogs. Dr. Marder shares her conclusions on dog bite related fatalities.

Although very rare, fatal dog bites consistently capture media and public attention. Often the breed of the dog pre-dominates the conversation. As a result, much of public policy discussion related to the prevention of dog bites in general has focused on breed-specific legislation.

The Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), however, recently published the most comprehensive study of dog bite-related fatalities (DBRFs) ever done which directly challenges the conventional wisdom to focus on breed. The results of the study come as welcome news to organizations including the AVMA, ASPCA, Humane Society of the United States, and the ARL who have opposed breed-specific legislation.

Dr. Amy Marder, director at the ARL’s Center for Shelter Dogs (CSD), and Dr. Gary Patronek, a consultant to CSD, joined co-authors Jeffrey Sacks, lead author on earlier studies of DBRFs, and Karen Delise and Donald Cleary, both of the National Canine Research Council, in an in-depth analysis of all DBRFs known to have occurred during a ten-year period between 2000–2009.

The authors employed investigative techniques different than those used in previous dog bite or DBRF studies.

Instead of relying primarily on information contained in news accounts, researchers compiled detailed case histories from homicide detectives, animal control agencies, and case investigators. Using these sources, researchers collected information over a longer period of time, revealing more facts pertaining to each case.

Analysis revealed four or more controllable factors were present in over 80% of fatal dog bites. Very importantly, breed was not one of those factors.

Callie DogThe authors found:

• In 87% of cases, no able-bodied person was present to intervene

• In 85% of cases, the victim had no familiar relationship with the dog

• In 84% of cases, the owner failed to spay/neuter the dog

• In 77% of cases, whether because of age or physical condition, a victim had compromised ability to manage their interactions with the dog

• In 76% of cases, the owner kept a dog as a resident dog on a property, rather than as a family pet

• In 38% of cases, the owner had previously mismanaged the dog

• In 21% of cases, the owner had abused or neglected the dog

In only 45 (18%) of DBRF cases could researchers make a valid determination that the animal was a member of a distinct, recognized breed. Twenty different breeds, along with two known mixes, were identified in connection with those 45 incidents.

So what can we learn from all of this? Based on the data, the most logical conclusion is repealing breed-specific legislation. Additionally, there need to be more efforts directed at improving our collective understanding of dog behavior, as well as how dogs are cared for and managed in our communities. This will have a much greater impact on bite prevention and control.