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Category: News
Press Release: Microchip Helps Reunite Lost Cat with Owners

Family notified of cat being found on Valentine’s Day

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is once again reminding the public of the importance of having pets microchipped – this after recently reuniting a Stoughton, MA, family with their cat who went missing shortly before Christmas.

Four-year-old Tigger snuck out of his Stoughton home on December 23, 2018, to explore the outdoors. Perhaps spooked by his surroundings, Tigger ran when his owners tried to get him back inside and unfortunately did not return.

In the following days and weeks, Tigger’s family posted the cat’s picture on social media and posted flyers in their neighborhood and nearby businesses – but still Tigger was not found.

Tigger back in the comforts of home but with a reminder of the elements — note the frostbite on his left ear.

On February 10, a local resident brought a stray cat to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center. The cat was emaciated, dehydrated, and had suffered from frostbite on its left ear and front paw due to long-term exposure to the elements.

The cat received fluids and was checked by ARL staff and was also scanned for a microchip. The chip was registered to a Florida resident, however after a little detective work, ARL tracked the owner from Florida to Stoughton.

A certification letter was sent to the Stoughton address, and owner Jackie Rhone tells ARL the cat was originally a gift for her 17-year-old daughter, and after two months had given up any hope of finding Tigger.

“That evening (Valentine’s Day) we went out for an errand and when we returned home my husband checked the mail, and when he came inside he screamed “read this Jackie quick”! I started reading it out loud with tears rolling down my face and said “they found our Tigger!”’, Rhone said.

Tigger was reunited with his family two days later and is now strictly an indoor cat.

This reunion would not have been possible if Tigger hadn’t been microchipped.

A Permanent ID

A microchip is a computer chip about the size of a grain of rice, programmed with an identification number unique to your pet. It is non-toxic, non-allergenic, and will last the life of your pet with no maintenance required.

A microchip greatly increases the likelihood of being reunited with a lost pet – an AVMA study shows 52 percent of dogs with microchips are reunited with owners, versus just 21 percent with dogs with no microchip. Owner return rates for cats with microchips is 38 percent versus 1.8 percent for cats without the chip.

ARL recommends pet owners to ensure their animal is microchipped, and to also keep contact information up to date.


Boston Globe Subscribers – YOU Can Help ARL!

Vote for ARL as Your Favorite Non-profit

The GRANT allows Globe subscribers to show their support for non-profits by choosing which organizations get free advertising space in The Boston Globe. In February, subscribers began receiving their silver envelopes in the mail, and have until April 30 to either return the voucher, or submit their GRANT dollars online.

 

Maggie the pup

Submitting your GRANT voucher is an easy way to help animals like Maggie find their forever home!

 

View the Leaderboard

ARL does not receive any government or public funding and relies solely on the generosity of compassionate individuals to carry out our important work to help animals and communities in need. Free ad space in The Boston Globe would allow ARL to reach even more people about the mission, values, programs and services that make ARL an unwavering champion for animals in need.

If you haven’t sent in your voucher, you have until April 30 to do so, please remember to write in the “Animal Rescue League of Boston” as your non-profit choice and spread the word to your fellow Boston Globe subscribers. 


BVC Medical Director Utilizes Pencil for Dislocated Jaw

Cats. They just seem to find the oddest places to hide, and for Trixie, a 1.5-year-old cat, this past week she decided (unbeknownst to her owner) that behind a dresser drawer would be a fabulous place to lay low.

Unfortunately when her owner closed the drawer, the curious cat was caught between a drawer and a hard place, and suffered a dislocated jaw. As a result, Trixie could not close her mouth.

Her very concerned owner brought the cat to Boston Veterinary Care (BVC), where Trixie was sedated and examined.

Trixie on the mend after BVC veterinarian Dr. Nicole Breda used a pencil as a fulcrum to pop her dislocated jaw back in place.

X-rays confirmed which side of the jaw had dislocated, and the next question became – how to pop it back into place?

BVC Medical Director Dr. Nicole Breda used a good old-fashioned No. 2 pencil as a fulcrum, placing it in the way back of the jaw on the left side and slowly closed Trixie’s mouth. The pencil did the trick as the jaw popped perfectly back into place!

Trixie will make a full recovery and was sent home with anti-inflammatories and placed on a soft food diet for a week, but after that she’ll be ready to find her next hiding spot.

Another tool in the toolbox for the veterinary team at BVC.

About Boston Veterinary Care

BVC is a clinic with a mission as all profits benefit the shelter animals of ARL. BVC aspires to integrate the health of animals into the community consciousness for both the benefit of animals and people, and to serve ARL’s mission of keeping animals safe and healthy out of shelters and in the habitats and homes where they belong.

BVC provides a host of services including wellness exams, surgery, dental care, radiology and advanced diagnostics. New clients receive a free wellness exam, and Tuesday evenings are cat-only, to promote a low-stress environment.

To schedule an appointment call (617) 226-5605 or email bvc@arlboston.org.


Surrendered Horse Returns to Original Owners

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) aims to place every animal in our care into loving homes, but for George, an approximately 23-year-old saddlebred horse, an amazing collaborative effort helped him be reunited with his original owners – 15 years later and 1,300 miles away!

To see a video on George’s amazing story click here!

George came to ARL in September 2018 with several other horses who were surrendered when their owner could no longer properly care for them.

George was slightly underweight and needed medical care and general grooming but was overall in good health.

After spending a couple of months recuperating at ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center, George was put into foster care, and almost immediately his foster parent and equine enthusiast Cordula Robinson realized that she was caring for an extraordinary animal.

“He was highly intelligent, elegant, well-trained and had clearly known love, he was very engaged with humans,” Robinson said.

Talking to a trainer friend, Cordula was encouraged to reach out to saddlebred agencies up and down the east coast to see if someone would recognize George, and was surprised when someone in New Jersey reached out.

Turns out that George was well-known in the saddlebred world, and competed under the name “Midnight Memory Maker”.

Sadly, his original owner, Todd Mathieson, passed away in 2006, and Todd’s wife Diane decided to rehome George. George did however continue to compete for a number of years.

When Diane was contacted, she was overwhelmed and ecstatic for the possibility of being reunited with George, after spending 15 years apart.

Thanks to a collaborative effort, arrangements were made to transport George from Boston to Ocala, Florida and this week George and Diane were reunited and the former show horse has now come full circle and is back with his original family to enjoy his retirement.

ARL is grateful to everyone whose compassion for animals helped make this incredible reunion possible!


It’s National Spay and Neuter Awareness Month!

Spay and Neutering Pets Promotes Health and Longevity

For all of us, the health and well-being of our beloved family pets is paramount; and the simplest way to reduce nuisance and aggressive behaviors, improve long-term health and longevity, is to have your dog or cat spayed or neutered.

February is National Spay and Neuter Awareness Month, and here at the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), we field questions about spay and neuter on a daily basis which typically revolve around two issues – cost and understanding the real and long-term benefits for you and your pet.

Affordable Options Exist

Don’t let cost be a barrier, as there are numerous affordable options throughout Massachusetts that are readily available.

Be sure to talk with your veterinarian about your best course of action, but here are a couple of options.

ARL’s Spay Waggin’ is a mobile veterinary clinic offering high-quality and affordable spay and neuter services. The Spay Waggin’ has been serving Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard, the South Shore and South Coast for nearly 20 years; performing more than 50,000 surgeries along the way.

Another place to turn is your local Animal Control Officer. The Massachusetts Animal Fund’s spay and neuter voucher program allows low-income residents receiving state assistance to get their pets this important surgery free of charge. Vouchers can be obtained through your city or town’s Animal Control Officer and are redeemed at participating providers, including ARL’s Spay Waggin’ and Community Surgical Clinic.

By the way, you can help keep this program going by donating on your state tax form on line 33f!

Long-Term Health Benefits

Caring for animals can be expensive, especially when it comes to their health. But consider this – having your pet spayed or neutered can reduce the risk of serious, and costly, health problems later in life.

Neutering male dogs and cats before six months of age prevents testicular cancer and spaying female cats and dogs before their first heat reduces the risk of uterine infections and breast cancer.
Spaying and neutering can also reduce behavioral problems such as marking territory, howling or barking, aggression and wandering.

We all want our pets to live long and healthy lives, and having an animal spayed or neutered actually increases their longevity. According to published reports, neutered male dogs live 18 percent longer than unneutered males, and spayed females live 23 percent longer than spayed females.

Healthy Moms, Happy Litters

How about if you have a pet at home with an unwanted or accidental litter of puppies or kittens? No problem, the Animal Rescue League of Boston can help.

Through the Healthy Moms, Happy Litters program, ARL will provide free spay and neuter services and vaccinations for mother/father dogs and cats. Once the procedure is complete, and animals are returned to the owner.

ARL will also waive the surrender fee for the litter of puppies or kittens, who will be spayed or neutered, vaccinated and placed up for adoption.

Remember, there are an abundance of resources and help available to those who need it so please consider having your pet spayed or neutered for their happiness, their health, and for your piece of mind.


Update: Dedham Abandoned Cats Ready to Find Forever Home

Two kittens, one with a broken leg, who were abandoned in late November along a busy road in Dedham have spent two months in foster care recuperating, and today are ready to find their forever home.

The 8-month-old pair, Helga and Arnold, are now available at the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center.

When discovered, Helga had suffered a fractured right hind leg and the fact her bones are still developing, ARL’s veterinary staff determined the best course would be for restricted movement in foster care and allow the leg to heal on its own. X-rays taken Tuesday determined that Helga’s fracture has healed.

The cats are being adopted as a bonded pair, meaning they will need to go home together.

While Helga and Arnold will soon be in a loving home, the person(s) responsible for abandoning these animals has not been identified. ARL Law Enforcement continues to ask for the public’s assistance and any information can be given over the phone (617) 426-9170, or via email cruelty@arlboston.org.

Original Release, dated 11/28/18:

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is currently caring for a pair of six-month-old cats who were left in a cardboard box along High St., a busy thoroughfare in Dedham. One of the cats is suffering from a broken leg and ARL Law Enforcement is seeking information to find the person responsible for this cruel act.

While driving along High St. this past weekend, a Good Samaritan witnessed a man standing in front of a box along High St., and drove away when the driver pulled over. Stunned to find the cats in the box, the Good Samaritan brought the cats to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center, along with the contents of the box. There was pertinent information inside the box which ARL Law Enforcement is following up on.

The man was driving a dark-colored SUV i.e. Toyota RAV4/Honda CRV, and is described as a white male in his 30’s or 40’s.

The cats, named Arnold and Helga, are not microchipped, and both are extremely friendly. Along with an injured leg, a rabbit nail was found embedded into Helga’s tail – both cats were dirty but overall in good health.

The cats will continue to be monitored and undergo medical treatment, and the goal is to have them both into new, loving homes for the holidays.

ARL Law Enforcement is investigating this crime with Dedham Police, and asks that anyone with information to contact ARL (cruelty@arlboston.org; (617) 426-9170).
Abandoning an animal is a felony in Massachusetts, punishable by up to seven years in prison and a $5,000 fine.


Press Release: Cat Abandoned at Sullivan Square T Stop

Heard crying and was found “shoved” underneath a bench

*PLEASE NOTE: Marlee is not currently available for adoption and we ask that you please refrain from calling to inquire about her as these calls quickly overwhelm our phone lines. Thank you for your patience!

A two-year-old cat is lucky to be alive after being abandoned at an MBTA bus stop in Sullivan Square on Monday, when temperatures in Boston were in the single digits, and below zero with the wind chill. The Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Law Enforcement Department is asking for the public’s help in finding who’s responsible.

At around 5 p.m. Monday, an unidentified female Good Samaritan heard crying and discovered the cat huddled in a carrier. Along with the frigid temperatures, the carrier the cat was in was reportedly soaked due to melting snow, making for extremely uncomfortable and dangerous conditions for the animal.

The woman described the carrier as being “shoved” under the bench, and the carrier also contained a blanket, toys, and perhaps some food.

The woman took the cat, named “Marlee”, with her to a local shelter where she is staying, and contacted ARL on Wednesday. ARL picked up Marlee and brought her to ARL’s Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center, located at 10 Chandler St.

Marlee was wearing a collar but does not have a microchip, and does not match any missing animal reports. Despite her ordeal she does appear to be healthy and is very friendly.

The animal has yet to undergo a physical examination by ARL’s veterinary staff, but did not suffer from hypothermia and will likely be available for adoption in the next couple of weeks.

Because ARL continuously sees cases of animals being left to fend for themselves, the organization once again reminds the public that abandoning an animal is NEVER an option – if you are unable to properly care for an animal, they can always be surrendered to ARL or any reputable rescue organization. Abandoning an animal is a felony in Massachusetts, punishable by up to 7 years in prison and a $5,000 fine.

Consider making a gift today. By giving to ARL, you’re providing life-saving rescue and law enforcement investigations, as well as the veterinary care that gets animals like Marlee back on their feet and ready for adoption to a safe, warm home after facing difficult ordeals. Click here to make a donation today.

Anyone with information regarding this case is asked to contact ARL Law Enforcement at (617) 426-9170 or email cruelty@arlboston.org.


Winter is here – ARL reminds pet owners to protect animals from the cold

Winter is finally here in New England, and with the first extreme cold snap upon us, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) reminds pet owners to take cold-weather precautions to protect pets — frigid conditions can endanger the well-being, safety, and the lives of the pets we love.

Here are some things to keep in mind not just for this arctic blast, but for the remainder of winter:

  1. Prepare your dog for the elements. If you have a longer coat dog, let it grow out for the winter; it will provide warmth and protection from the cold. For shorter coat dogs, sweaters, coats and booties can go a long way to protect your pooch.
  2. Wipe off your dog’s paws and stomach. Sidewalks are treated with a number of chemicals. These chemicals can irritate your dog’s paws, and can be poisonous if ingested. When coming in from the cold, clean and dry your dog’s stomach to keep them healthy!
  3. Keep outdoor trips quick. Bathroom breaks or walks, keep it short and sweet and keep your pets indoors as much as possible.
  4. Never leave your dog alone in a cold car. Many Massachusetts residents are aware that it’s illegal to keep an animal in a hot car, under the same law it’s ALSO illegal to keep your animal in a cold car (Ma. Ch. 140, Section 174F. (a) A person shall not confine an animal in a motor vehicle in a manner that could reasonably be expected to threaten the health of the animal due to exposure to extreme heat or cold). When going out, leave your animals at home.
  5. Pay attention to your pet’s grooming and health. An animal with a matted coat cannot keep him or herself warm! Long-haired pets especially during heavy periods of shedding, need extra help maintaining a healthy coat. Senior pets also suffer from increased arthritis pain in the cold, so check with your veterinarian on how to keep your pet comfortable.
  6. Check under the hood. Cats love to warm up underneath the hood of a car, as the residual heat from the engine burns off. Unfortunately, this method of warming up can have dangerous consequences, such as severe burns and other grave injuries. Always pound on the hood of your vehicle and do a quick visual check before starting the engine.

The chill can kill! So bottom line, if it’s too cold for you to be outside, it’s also too cold for your pet to be outside.

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Press Release: More than a Dozen Dogs Reported Missing from Small Swath of Dorchester

According to lost animal reports filed with the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), Boston Animal Control and Missing Dogs Massachusetts, 14 dogs have been reported missing in the Franklin Field North, Grove Hall area of Dorchester since July 2018 to the present.

The dogs reported missing are all small breeds – Chihuahuas, Shih-Tzus, Mini Pinschers – there is one confirmed case of a dog being stolen; but it is unknown why the other animals have gone missing.

Given the number of animals missing, ARL is reminding dog owners in the area to be mindful and vigilant of their surroundings while walking their dogs.

Additionally, ARL recommends that animals:

  • Be microchipped – A dog with a microchip is twice as likely to be reunited with their owner
  • Have updated tags
  • Kept on a leash
  • Not left alone outdoors
  • Not left alone in a vehicle

If your dog does go missing, it’s imperative to file a lost report with ARL, Animal Control and other organizations including Missing Dogs Massachusetts to ensure that the report is being seen by as many people possible.

It’s recommended to post missing flyers around the neighborhood as well. Flyers should include your pet’s photo, name, breed, color, weight, and any distinguishing characteristics. Ask neighbors to check their properties for your animal, and see if postal and utility workers, and anyone else who frequents the neighborhood if they have seen your missing pet. Be sure to check with other local rescue agencies as well.

Last but not least, don’t forget to harness the power of social media! Post on Craigslist, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and any other format to alert as many people as possible.

ABOUT THE ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE OF BOSTON:
The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is an unwavering champion for animals in need, committed to keeping them safe and healthy in habitats and homes. Founded in 1899, ARL provides high quality veterinary care, adoption, and rescue services; while also confronting the root causes of animal cruelty and neglect through innovative community programs, police investigations, and public advocacy. In 2017, ARL served more than 18,000 animals throughout Massachusetts. ARL is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization. We receive no government grants or public funding and rely solely on the generosity of individuals to support programs and services that help animals in need.
For more information please visit us online at www.arlboston.org; and be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Press Release: ARL Tallies First Cat Rescue of 2019

Feline trapped on rooftop three stories up in Dorchester

The Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Rescue Services Department tallied its first cat rescue of 2019 Thursday afternoon, as a three-year-old male cat named Gadget managed to sneak out of his home on Wednesday and found his way atop a roof along Gaston Street in Dorchester, MA.

The rescue had a high degree of difficulty, as the cat was on a shingled area approximately two feet wide just below the jutting roof. Agents ascended the fire escape, however there was still a three-foot gap between where the cat was and the fire escape.

Attempts using nets and hook poles proved to be unsuccessful, however a narrow board placed from the fire escape to the shingled area turned out to be the best approach – particularly when Gadget’s owners came to the scene after leaving work.

Stephanie Mitchell, Gadget’s owner, conquered her fear of heights and climbed the fire escape with the cat’s favorite food. Slowly but surely the cat gained enough confidence to make it across the board and into the waiting hands of ARL Rescue Agents.

Gadget was hungry and scared, but was not injured during his adventure. Upon getting the cat home Mitchell replied “I’m so grateful and so happy to have Gadget back home!”

Answering the Call

ARL is the only animal welfare organization in Massachusetts with a dedicated technical rescue department and rescues thousands of animals annually, including more than 200 cats being trapped in trees and other precarious places.