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Articles Tagged with: animal cruelty
Limited Release “See Something, Say Something” Doggy T-Shirts Now Available

You & Your Dog Can Make a Difference!

Dog T-shirt 1April is Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month and yesterday marked the beginning of Animal Cruelty and Human Violence Awareness Week.

Your dog can raise awareness about animal cruelty by wearing one of the ARL’s doggy t-shirts!

Starting this weekend when you make a $25 donation at any of the ARL’s shelters in Boston, Brewster, or Dedham you’ll receive a limited release “See Something, Say Something” doggie t-shirt.

We have many sizes available!

Learn more at arlboston.org/take-action


Lt. Borgal on the Link Between Animal Cruelty and Community Violence [VIDEO]

As a reminder that April is Prevention of Cruelty to Animals month, today we’re sharing a video featuring Lt. Alan Borgal, director of the ARL’s Center for Animal Protection. Lt. Borgal emphasizes the link between cruelty to animals and family and community violence and encourages you to contact local authorities if you suspect animal cruelty or neglect. Remember YOU can give a voice to the victims of animal cruelty, if when you see something, you say something!

A very special thanks to GreatGrandPaws for producing the video for us!

You can give a voice to the victims of animal cruelty. Learn more at arlboston.org/take-action

Download our flyer on how to spot potential signs of animal cruelty.


7 Warning Signs of Potential Animal Cruelty

Subtle indications that may indicate an animal is at risk

While most of us recognize that punching, kicking, burning, choking, or hitting an animal with an object are acts of animal cruelty, there are also several more subtle warning signs of animal cruelty to watch for that could indicate mistreatment, neglect, or abuse:

  1. Howling or barking for a sustained period of time or hearing an animal cry in pain with higher pitched, more persistent vocal sounds than usual.
  2. Singed, matted, chronically or excessively dirty hair or fur.
  3. Wounds, unusual scars, hair loss, frequent limping often on different legs, or signs of improper nutrition such as weight loss or prominent visible ribs.
  4. Animals kept caged or tied with little room to move for long periods of time or without regular interaction with people
  5. Lack of protection from the weather or fece- or debris-strewn living areas for animals.
  6. Collars, leashes, or halters so tight they visibly dig into the animal’s face or neck.
  7. A large number of animals coming or going from a property.

See Something, Say Something

If you know or suspect animal cruelty, report concerns to your local authorities.  Learn more about how you can prevent animal cruelty at arlboston.org/take-action


Puppy Doe Update: What You Can Do to Prevent Future Cases of Animal Cruelty

Puppy Doe’s call to action: see something, say something

In addition to continuing to support the on-going investigation and prosecution of the Puppy Doe case, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) has issued a call to action to the public to report suspected animal abuse to local authorities.

All too often, animal cruelty remains undiscovered. By many estimates, 4 out of 5 cases remain concealed, leaving animals to suffer in silence. Yet we can all give a voice to victims of animal cruelty if when we see something, we say something.

In the words of ARL’s president Mary Nee, “public awareness and people speaking up will be our strongest defense against future cases of animal cruelty.”

In the months since the news about her case first broke, many individuals and organizations have taken action related to Puppy Doe at their own initiative. We respect the right of individuals and businesses to express and pursue their ideas, whether it’s writing a book, selling a product, or producing a video. The ARL, however, has no involvement with any of these projects.

When we’re asked what people can do to channel the grief, sadness, and rage they feel about what happened to Puppy Doe, we suggest supporting an animal welfare organization.

Donate, volunteer, adopt a shelter pet….help them further the work they’re doing to help animals in need.

And most importantly, speak up and report suspicions of animal cruelty, neglect, and abuse to local authorities. If when you see something, you say something, you can make a tremendous difference.

Learn more about the signs of animal abuse and visit arlboston.org/take-action for more on what you can do to help animals recover from cruelty and neglect.

 


The ARL and Cruelty Prevention

How We Give A Voice to the Victims of Animal Cruelty

Ollie, one of the original Middleboro Puppies who has already been adopted! (Photo: Amelia Hughes)

Ollie, one of the original Middleboro Puppies who has already been adopted! (Photo: Amelia Hughes)

The public and media attention to the recent cases of Puppy Doe, Kitty, and the Middleboro puppies has shined a light on the issue of animal cruelty, and many are calling for tougher laws.

We wholeheartedly endorse legislation that helps to protect animals in Massachusetts to the level that they deserve. Heightened awareness of penalties not only helps reduce the number of tragic cases of animal suffering, but also moves us closer to a more just and humane society where both people and animals are valued.

The Association of Prosecuting Attorneys released a strong statement of principles regarding the prosecution of animal cruelty crimes which we applaud.

Now some of our readers might be thinking, that’s all well and good, but what exactly does the ARL do about it?

First, we can tell you that we meet with elected officials and legislators at the local and state level to help them understand and craft animal welfare policies and laws.   Members of our staff attend and testify at public hearings as different legislative committees and state agencies review practices, policies, and laws.

We also actively collaborate with the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Massachusetts Veterinary Medical Association, the Animal Legal Defense Fund, the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association, the Massachusetts District Attorney’s Association and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in pursuit of legislation that advances animal welfare and protection.

To further influence positive change for animals in our state, we also work with organizations and agencies such as Massachusetts Animal Coalition, the Department of Agriculture, and the Animal Control Officers of Massachusetts on a variety of animal welfare issues.

Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore

Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore

By way of specifics on our legislative and policy work…..

  • The ARL’s Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore serves as the chair elect of the AVMA Animal Welfare Committee.  This committee makes policy recommendations for issues related to animals on a national level and influences national animal welfare law and practices by working closely with federal agencies such as the USDA, APHIS, and others.
  • We have prepared a friend of the court brief in conjunction with Animal Legal Defense Fund for the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, the state’s highest court Massachusetts, in support of granting police the ability to enter a property without a search warrant if they believe any animals are in immediate danger. A hearing will be held at the SJC on December 3rd.
  • The ARL also participated in the development and passage of the Homeless Animal Prevention and Care Act (HAPCA), the tax check off that will help to provide training to Animal Control Officers in Massachusetts to advance the level of humane care of animals.  The HAPCA also supports the spaying and neutering of homeless animals and animals owned people of limited economic means in the state.

Learn more by visiting arlboston.org/take-action

 


How to Identify Signs of Animal Abuse

Identifying Potential Pet Abuse

We’ve been emphasizing this message for the past few months, but it never hurts to say it again. If you see something, say something. Meaning, if you suspect that an animal is being abused, please call your local authorities.

Here are a few signs that may suggest that an animal is being abused.

11-13 Signs of Animal AbuseTake note of the following:

  • If a person keeps changing the story about their pet’s history
  • Listen to children’s responses to questions about their pets
  • Ask about other household pets
  • Observe how family members interact with each other
  • Observe how an animal acts around certain family members

Warning signs that could raise suspicion a.k.a. red flags:

  • Pets with chronic injuries or medical conditions that go untreated
  • Other injuries that are healing, in addition to a new injury
  • Pet owners who use the services of several veterinarians
  • Pet owners who constantly have new puppies or kittens, but not adult or aging pets
  • Injuries attributed to unknown causes, i.e. someone tells you that their pet has many accidental injuries
  • Multiple injured animals at the same house

If you know or suspect that an animal is being neglected or abused, contact your local authorities. Thank you for helping us protect and improve the lives of local animals!

*Portions of this blog post have been reposted from an article called How to Recognize Animal Abuse and What to do About it by the Veterinary Team Brief by Lisa Bourazak, DVM, MPT, Kate Creevy DVM, MS, DACVIM, and Karen Cornell DVM, PhD, DACVS.


Link Between Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence

Studies Show a Correlation Between Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence

In light of the recent Puppy Doe case, we’re discussing the link between animal abuse and domestic violence and why it’s important to say something if you see something.

When you report animal abuse, you are likely helping other members of the family in addition to the animal.

*For example, 71% of women seeking shelter at a safe house for battered partners who reported owning a pet reported that their partner had threatened and/or actually hurt or killed one or more of their pets, although it was not easy for them to discuss. In one study, 26 women who had been the subjects of domestic violence reported that their male partners had also verbally and/or physically abused the household pet(s), yet the majority of the women were unwilling to discuss it with their veterinarian.3

Other studies have shown that children who live in violent households are more likely to be cruel to animals. In a survey of 860 college students regarding family violence and animal abuse, 60% of students who reported witnessing or perpetrating animal cruelty as a child also reported experiences with child maltreatment or domestic violence.

DEFINING ABUSE

Animal cruelty, abuse, and neglect are defined differently, according to the intent of the perpetrator. According to the AVMA

  • Animal cruelty is any deliberate act that, by intention or neglect, causes an animal unnecessary pain or suffering, including inflicting pain on an animal for the abuser’s enjoyment or amusement.
  • Animal abuse is the maltreatment of an animal regardless of the perpetrator’s intent, motivation, or mental condition. The perpetrator’s deliberate intent distinguishes cruelty from abuse.
  • Animal neglect is defined as the failure to provide an animal sufficient water, food, shelter, and/or veterinary care; lack of grooming; and lack of sanitation. These failures may be the result of ignorance, poverty, or other extenuating circumstances. This is the most commonly investigated situation.

*This blog post has been reposted from an article called How to Recognize Animal Abuse and What to do About it by the Veterinary Team Brief by Lisa Bourazak, DVM, MPT, Kate Creevy DVM, MS, DACVIM, and Karen Cornell DVM, PhD, DACVS.


Giving a Voice to Victims of Animal Cruelty

If You See Something, Say Something

Puppy Doe suffered some of the most sadistic abuse anyone that the Animal Rescue League of Boston has ever seen, yet her case could have just as easily remained concealed were it not for people expressing their concerns to authorities.

When a passerby found Puppy Doe near a park, this private citizen called police.

When the veterinarian who initially treated Puppy Doe had questions about the extent of the injuries and wounds she saw on the dog’s body, she called the ARL to share her suspicions.

They saw something.  They said something.  They made the difference in the initial discovery of Puppy Doe’s abuse.  And a suspect is now in custody facing 11 counts of animal cruelty.

Her case has drawn a great deal of attention to the issue of animal cruelty, and many are calling for tougher laws.

While legislation that improves the way we treat and protect animals in Massachusetts will help prevent future cases like Puppy Doe’s, we must all accept our collective responsibility to protect animals like Puppy Doe and have the courage when we see or suspect animal abuse, to report it to our local police.

Because animals have no voice, it’s not surprising that, by some estimates, as many as four out of five cases of animal cruelty go undiscovered.

In spite of the excruciating and unimaginable pain Puppy Doe endured, she did it in silence.  She had no choice.  We can all be a voice for victims of animal cruelty like her if when we see something, we say something.

Learn more about the many victims of animal cruelty on our Take Action page: arlboston.org/take-action/


PUPPY DOE UPDATE: Suspect Faces 11 Counts of Animal Cruelty

ARL will continue to support what remains an active investigation

The Quincy Police Department announced an arrest in the Puppy Doe abuse case and today the suspect was charged with 11 counts of animal cruelty in Quincy District Court.

Norfolk County District Attorney Michael Morrissey, Quincy Chief of Police Paul Keenan, and ARL president Mary Nee joined together for a press conference immediately following today’s court proceedings.

Watch the complete broadcast of the press conference on NECN: http://www.necn.com/10/29/13/NEWS-CONFERENCE-No-known-motive-in-Puppy/landing.html?blockID=856317&feedID=11106

10-29 Puppy Doe Update Press Conference Screenshot

 


Puppy Doe Update 10/16

Puppy Doe Investigation Making Progress

Work continues to identify who severely abused Puppy Doe, a young adult female dog dumped in a quiet neighborhood in Quincy, Massachusetts.

Norfolk County District Attorney Michael W. Morrissey and the Quincy Police Department are the only organizations releasing official details on the investigation.  To update the public on the progress of the investigation , the District Attorney released the following statement last week:

On behalf of my office, the Quincy Police Department, and the Animal Rescue League of Boston, I am grateful for the hundreds of calls and tips that have been forthcoming in the criminal investigation into the torture of Puppy Doe. We have been inundated with tips, concerns and offers of assistance from around the world.

As Paul Keenan, Quincy Police Chief, has said, “Please be assured that we are following up with each tip received even those that have taken us out of state.”

Many calls have been received requesting updated information on the status and progress of the investigation. As with all criminal investigations, we are unable to discuss publically the specifics of this very active and ongoing investigation. To do so would not only compromise the investigation, but would also violate the ethical rules to which this office is bound. The information we have received to date from the public has been invaluable in guiding our actions through the course of the investigation.

10-16 Puppy Doe Update Photo rest in peacePlease be assured that these three agencies are working in concert to identify and hold accountable the person or persons responsible for the torture of Puppy Doe. It is highly unlikely that this level of sadistic cruelty could be shown to one animal and not be part of a pattern involving other animals or perhaps vulnerable people.

Anyone with information material to the criminal investigation regarding Puppy Doe is encouraged to contact the Animal Rescue League of Boston, Law Enforcement Department at 617-226-5610, email them at cruelty@arlboston.org, or call Quincy Police Detective Thomas Pepdjonovich at 617-745-5774.

We will continue to post updates on the Puppy Doe case as we receive them from the District Attorney.