fbpx
Category: Boston
Abandoned 19-Year-Old Cat Needs Home for the Holidays

Cats of this age rarely seen in shelters

UPDATE: Tangee has been adopted!! Thank you to the hundreds of caring individuals who reached out regarding this sweet girl. She has found a wonderful home not only for the holidays, but for the rest of her life.

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is looking to find a home for a 19-year-old cat who was recently abandoned by her owner, who has apparently moved out of state.

Tangee has quickly become a staff favorite!

Given her age, ARL is determined to find someone willing to open their home and heart for this special animal just in time for Christmas.

“Tangee” was initially brought to Boston Animal Control by a woman who had dropped a man off at Logan Airport. When exiting the vehicle, he handed the woman the cat and a note which indicated that he was moving to Florida and could not take the cat.

A forwarding phone number left by the man was to a pharmacy, and while the cat is microchipped, it was not registered so there is no possible way to follow-up with the owner.

While there’s no exact way to equate an animal’s age to human years, best estimates are that a 19-year-old cat is roughly 96-years-old in human years.

Tangee does have signs of early renal disease primarily due to her age, but overall she is in good health and is very friendly. She deserves to be out of the shelter and in a loving home for the holidays, and with your help, we will make it happen.

Home for the Holidays

For many, the holiday season brings feelings of warmth, comfort, and friendship – and our wish for you and all the animals in our care is to experience the joy of the holidays.

Your generous support made this wish come true for thousands of animals so far this year, including:

  • 4,420 pets and community cats who were spayed and neutered to keep them healthy
  • 2,770 animals who were rehabilitated and adopted into forever homes
  • 980 pets who received affordable pet wellness services in the convenience of their own community
  • 275 cats and dogs who were transported away from overcrowded shelters in other states

But this important work to help animals is not close to being done. Your support is critical to ensure that ARL is ready to respond when animals are in need of help. Please consider donating to ARL this holiday season, so together we can help animals like Tangee and thousands like her!


New England Patriots Cheerleaders Visit ARL

This past weekend, members of the New England Patriots Cheerleading squad spent some time at the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center to make some cat treats and to spread some holiday cheer to some adorable adoptable puppies!

The visit to ARL was part of the Patriots Cheerleaders Holiday Service Day and was a perfect fit as several members of the squad are avid animal lovers. ARL thanks the Patriots Cheerleaders for spending a little time with ARL’s animals, staff, volunteers and even some lucky patrons!


Surrendered Puppy Finds a Home for the Holidays

Back in July, Peaches, a one-year-old Fox Terrier, had a scary accident that would terrify any pet owner – she fell out of a second-story window!

Suffering a broken leg, her owners unfortunately could not afford the associated medical costs for such an injury and surrendered her to their local animal control officer.

Animal control reached out to the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), who happily took the puppy in and started her on the road to recovery.

The leg was bandaged and splinted, and over the next 12 weeks Peaches had a regimented routine.

Every week the leg was cleaned, re-bandaged and splinted, and every four weeks Peaches would be x-rayed to see how she was healing.

With a lengthy recovery at hand, Peaches was placed into foster care some extra TLC, and to heal in a quiet, stress-free environment.

While in foster care, Peaches made such an impression that her foster home became her forever home!

Home for the Holidays

For many, the holiday season brings feelings of warmth, comfort, and friendship – and our wish for you and all the animals in our care is to experience the joy of the holidays.

Your generous support made this wish come true for thousands of animals so far this year, including:

  • 4,420 pets and community cats who were spayed and neutered to keep them healthy
  • 2,770 animals who were rehabilitated and adopted into forever homes
  • 980 pets who received affordable pet wellness services in the convenience of their own community
  • 275 cats and dogs who were transported away from overcrowded shelters in other states

But this important work to help animals is not close to being done. Your support is critical to ensure that ARL is ready to respond when animals are in need of help. Please consider donating to ARL this holiday season, so together we can help animals like Peaches and thousands like her!


Home for the Holidays

For many, the holiday season brings feelings of warmth, comfort, and friendship – and our wish for you and all the animals in our care is to experience the joy of the holidays.

Your generous support made this wish come true for thousands of animals so far this year, including:

  • 4,420 pets and community cats who were spayed and neutered to keep them healthy
  • 2,770 animals who were rehabilitated and adopted into forever homes
  • 980 pets who received affordable pet wellness services in the convenience of their own community
  • 275 cats and dogs who were transported away from overcrowded shelters in other states

But this important work to help animals is not close to being done.

In the last two months alone, ARL rescued over 160 animals from the horrors of neglect — and even more cases are under active investigation.  There has been a troubling increase in the number of animal cruelty and hoarding-type cases that result in a sudden influxes of animals in dire need, which is why your donations are critical to make sure we can stand ready to answer the call for help at any time.

At the same time, our shelter population is changing and we are seeing more animals with complex medical and behavior issues that require additional resources, skilled staff, and extra time to improve.

These animals need you now more than ever, and it’s not too late to help!

Animals give us so much.  Please consider giving back by donating today.

symbolic gifts

Thank you for your thoughtful year-end gift that makes happier lives possible for animals all year long!

Need assistance or want to give by phone? Please call us at (617) 426-9170 x603

Prefer to donate by check? Please have it postmarked by December 31, so that it may be considered tax-deductible for 2019 to the extent allowed by IRS regulations.


Update: Lost Pup Undergoes Hip Replacement Surgery

Charlotte recovering but remains fearful

ARL first told you about Charlotte, a 10-month-old mixed-breed puppy in late September, when she was found in Belmont, MA, after being lost for a month. It’s miraculous she was able to survive on her own for that amount of time.

Charlotte was emaciated, weighing just 23 pounds when she was found, and also suffered from a fracture in the balled-end of the femur, which connects to the hip joint. To alleviate the pain and discomfort and to avoid lasting impacts, ARL Shelter Medicine Staff decided that a complete hip replacement was necessary.

Charlotte’s surgery was successful, and is now well on her way to recovery.

However, like many animals who are transported from the South, Charlotte was under-socialized and remains fearful of new people, places and other animals. But that’s where ARL’s behavioral experts come in.

Charlotte is currently in foster care, where there are other dogs in the home. She is learning to be around other animals, and is also becoming braver by the day with new people. Despite her skittishness, Charlotte is extremely friendly and does warm up fairly quickly.

Animals are of course resilient, and Charlotte will continue her physical and mental recovery, and will hopefully be made available for adoption soon.

Have a Behavioral Questions?

If you have basic behavioral questions about your pet, such as excessive barking, crate training, house soiling, etc., call ARL’s FREE Pet Behavior Helpline at (617) 226-5666 or email behaviorhelpline@arlboston.org and an ARL representative will respond within 48 hours.

Help Charlotte and Other Animals Like Her

ARL Shelter Medicine provides all levels of high-quality care – from wellness exams to complex surgeries. ARL’s Behavioral Department evaluates every dog and cat that enters ARL’s facilities and then tailors an individual plan to help the animal overcome behavioral issues and blossom.

Our goal is to ensure that animals are healthy and happy, and it’s because of the support of caring and compassionate people like you who make this possible. Please consider a donation to ARL today to help Charlotte and other animals like her.

red donate button


Winter is here – ARL reminds pet owners to protect animals from the cold

Winter is finally here in New England, and with the first extreme cold snap upon us, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) reminds pet owners to take cold-weather precautions to protect pets — frigid conditions can endanger the well-being, safety, and the lives of the pets we love.

Here are some things to keep in mind not just for this arctic blast, but for the remainder of winter:

  1. Prepare your dog for the elements. If you have a longer coat dog, let it grow out for the winter; it will provide warmth and protection from the cold. For shorter coat dogs, sweaters, coats and booties can go a long way to protect your pooch.
  2. Wipe off your dog’s paws and stomach. Sidewalks are treated with a number of chemicals. These chemicals can irritate your dog’s paws, and can be poisonous if ingested. When coming in from the cold, clean and dry your dog’s stomach to keep them healthy!
  3. Keep outdoor trips quick. Bathroom breaks or walks, keep it short and sweet and keep your pets indoors as much as possible.
  4. Never leave your dog alone in a cold car. Many Massachusetts residents are aware that it’s illegal to keep an animal in a hot car, under the same law it’s ALSO illegal to keep your animal in a cold car (Ma. Ch. 140, Section 174F. (a) A person shall not confine an animal in a motor vehicle in a manner that could reasonably be expected to threaten the health of the animal due to exposure to extreme heat or cold). When going out, leave your animals at home.
  5. Pay attention to your pet’s grooming and health. An animal with a matted coat cannot keep him or herself warm! Long-haired pets especially during heavy periods of shedding, need extra help maintaining a healthy coat. Senior pets also suffer from increased arthritis pain in the cold, so check with your veterinarian on how to keep your pet comfortable.
  6. Check under the hood. Cats love to warm up underneath the hood of a car, as the residual heat from the engine burns off. Unfortunately, this method of warming up can have dangerous consequences, such as severe burns and other grave injuries. Always pound on the hood of your vehicle and do a quick visual check before starting the engine.

The chill can kill! So bottom line, if it’s too cold for you to be outside, it’s also too cold for your pet to be outside.

###


Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act (PACT) Signed into Law

President Trump signed into law the Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act, or the PACT Act. The PACT Act is the first felony animal cruelty charge at the federal level.

The PACT Act may be the first felony animal cruelty law at the federal level, but it is a continuation of work that began almost 20 years ago. In 1999, Congress passed a law prohibiting creation, sale, and ownership of so called “animal crush videos.” These videos, a cruel and horrific depiction, were not illegal under any federal law. This 1999 law sought to stop the spread of these videos by targeting the videos themselves. However, there were concerns about the wording of the original law, and in 2010, the Supreme Court of the United States found the law was unconstitutional on the basis that the wording was broad and vague. After this setback, Congress passed the Animal Crush Video Prohibition Act of 2010. This law more narrowly prohibited the creation and distribution of such videos, but failed to criminalize the underlying animal cruelty in these videos.

Animal advocates have pushed for years to include these protections at the federal level, and finally, in 2019, we have a federal felony for the worst kinds of animal cruelty. This law prohibits conduct where mammals are “purposely crushed, burned, drowned, suffocated, impaled, or otherwise subjected to serious bodily injury…” Federal laws have limits as to what they can reach. To be a federal crime, it has to affect interstate commerce, or occur on federal lands. What this means practically is that many animal cruelty cases, which do not go across state lines, and may not include interstate commerce, can only be prosecuted at the state level. However, the omnipresent use of the internet brings “interstate commerce” into our lives almost every day.  

Animal cruelty is illegal in all 50 states. However, this law gives law enforcement another tool to stop the most horrendous of acts towards animals, often done for monetary gain.

ARL Advocacy in Action
The Animal Rescue League of Boston continues to support legislation that enhances and improves protections for animals. Click here to view our 2019-2020 Legislative Agenda.

 


Justice for J.T.

Salem Man Sentenced for Killing Kitten

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) congratulates the Salem Police Department and the Essex County District Attorney’s Office, as a Salem man was recently sentenced for punching and stabbing a kitten to death in January.

Peter Rice of Salem, pleaded guilty this past week to animal cruelty and carrying a dangerous weapon charges at Salem Superior Court. He was sentenced to two years in jail, followed by three years probation.

While watching his neighbor’s kitten named J.T., Rice told police be began punching and then stabbing the kitten after the animal scratched him while he was playing video games. He then buried the kitten under some leaves in a barrel on a nearby sidewalk.

As the investigation unfolded, ARL Law Enforcement was contacted and provided forensic assistance and expertise during the investigative process.

ARL wishes to again thank the Salem Police Department and Essex County District Attorney’s Office for their perseverance and steadfast commitment to stand up and speak for a defenseless animal who suffered unimaginable cruelty.

Providing Expertise and Support

ARL Law Enforcement works with local, state and federal agencies to investigate animal abuse, cruelty and neglect.

In 2018, ARL investigated cruelty and neglect cases involving nearly 3,000 animals, resulting in 56 prosecutions.

We cannot do this work alone. ARL receives no government grants or public funding and relies on individuals like you to support this important work.

If you donate to ARL today, your gift will have DOUBLE the impact,  and help ARL continue to confront animal cruelty, abuse and neglect.


5 Thanksgiving Foods Your Dog Should Avoid

Keep your pup joyful and healthy this holiday with these helpful tips

Thanksgiving is a time to savor delicious food, enjoy the company of our family and friends, and to show gratitude for all that we are thankful for in our lives.

While it’s wonderful to include your pets in your holiday traditions, it’s important to remember that our furry companions cannot indulge in the same feasts that we prepare for ourselves. Some of the common Thanksgiving foods that fill our plate can actually be very dangerous for your pet to ingest.

Here are the 5 Thanksgiving foods that your dog should avoid:

  1. Turkey bones are small and can become lodged in your dog’s throat, stomach, or intestinal tract. They may also splinter and cause severe damage to the stomach or puncture the small intestine.
  2. Fat trimmings and fatty foods like turkey skin and gravy are difficult for dogs to digest. In fact, consuming turkey skin can result in pancreatitis. Symptoms for this serious disease can include vomiting, extreme depression, reluctance to move, and abdominal pain.
  3. Dough and cake batter contain raw eggs, so the first concern for people and pets is salmonella bacteria. What’s more, dough may actually rise in your dog’s belly, which can lead to vomiting, severe abdominal pain, and bloating.
  4. Mushrooms can damage your dog’s internal organs, including kidneys, liver, and central nervous system. Symptoms can include seizures, coma, vomiting, and possibly death.
  5. Raisins and grapes, although the causes of their toxicity are unknown, can cause kidney failure in dogs.

The best way for your pet to partake in the holiday cheer? Stick with traditional treats that are safe for dogs and cats! Food puzzles and interactive toys like a Kong filled with peanut butter are a great way to keep your canine entertained and feeling satisfied all holiday long.

Bonus tip: Keep your vet’s emergency number handy. Should your pet become ill, contact your pet’s veterinarian or the local animal hospital’s number! A quick call to either of them can give you life-saving advice or even help you avoid a trip to the ER. 


Time to Find a Home!

Abandoned Pitbull Recovering After Complex Heart Procedure

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is ecstatic to report that Gunner, the nine-month-old Pitbull-type dog that recently underwent a complex heart procedure, is making a fast recovery and is now ready to find his forever home!

Gunner suffers from Pulmonic Stenosis – a genetic heart defect that restricts blood flow from the heart to the lungs.

He underwent a Balloon Valvuloplasty (BV) procedure, which places a special balloon catheter across the stenotic pulmonic valve and then inflated to create a larger opening to allow better blood flow from the heart to the lungs.

Although starved and abandoned, Gunner has always displayed a friendly, outgoing and excitable personality, and since his procedure, he’s even more excited!

Ready to Go Home

**Update 12/9: Gunner has been adopted!**

With his surgery complete, Gunner is now ready to find his forever home.

While recovering wonderfully post-surgery, those interested in adopting Gunner will need to consider the medical factors before taking him home.

Upon adoption Gunner will need a recheck echocardiogram in 3-6 months, and then every 1-2 years after that.

Because Gunner’s first BV procedure went so well, the likelihood of an additional surgery at this point is low, however it may become necessary in the future.

Gunner is currently in a foster home, but anyone interested in meeting this amazing pup can contact ARL’s Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center to set up an appointment.

Double Your Impact for Animals Like Gunner!

With routine medical care, diagnostic testing, surgery, follow-up-care and rehabilitation, the cost of correcting Gunner’s heart problem was an expensive endeavor. However, Gunner is just one example of the extraordinary care ARL’s shelter medicine staff provides to every animal who comes into our care.

This level of care is not possible without your support. ARL does not receive any government grants or public funding, and relies solely on the generosity of individuals like you to make a difference, and in Gunner’s case – save a life.

By donating to ARL today, your gift will be matched dollar for dollar to double your impact!