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Articles Tagged with: Too hot for Spot
Keep Your Pup Cool This Memorial Day Weekend

TOO HOT FOR SPOT – 4 important tips to keep your dog safe this holiday

This Memorial Day Weekend, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) want to remind you that the warm weather and bustle of the holiday’s festivities may be too stressful on your pup.

Pets don’t sweat like humans do and cannot cool their bodies efficiently in hot temperatures. Even when the outside temperature is 70 degrees, the inside of a car can heat up to more than 100 degrees in just minutes – even with the windows cracked! That’s why leaving your pet inside of a hot car is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke.

Watch this video to learn why it’s TOO HOT FOR SPOT.

With temperatures rising close to 90 degrees this weekend, remember these 4 important tips to keep your dog safe:

  1. heat stroke

    Never leave your pet alone in a parked car on a warm day- even with the windows cracked. It’s just TOO HOT FOR SPOT!

    Never leave your pup alone in a parked car if they must travel with you. On a hot day, the temperature inside a parked car can cause deadly heatstroke- even with the windows cracked.

  2. Always keep your canine on a leash or in a carrier if they must be outside. Set them up in a cool shady spot with ample air flow and plenty of fresh water.
  3. Keep your pooch away from potentially hazardous objects. Secure your pet a good distance from sparklers, BBQs, and pools. Remember that some pets can become “fearfully aggressive” due to loud noises, so monitor them closely, especially around small children.
  4. Make sure your dog’s microchip and ID tag information is current. Many animal shelters report increases of “stray” animals on holidays due to the number of pets running away from the noise and excitement. Be sure your contact information is current and always on your pup’s collar to ensure an easy reunion should they be separated from you.

Prevention is responsible pet ownership. When in doubt, leave your pet at home in a quiet cool room. Turn on a TV or radio to help detract from outside noises and leave them free to roam around so that they don’t feel too confined.

Learn more about why it’s TOO HOT FOR SPOT at arlboston.org/summersafety


Watch & Share: It’s TOO HOT FOR SPOT

Leaving a pet alone inside a hot car can have dangerous consequences

To raise awareness for this HOT animal welfare issue, the Animal Rescue League of Boston and Boston Veterinary Care ask our followers and the media to share important information about the dangers of leaving pets in parked cars during the warm summer months.

Pets don’t sweat like humans do and cannot cool their bodies efficiently in hot temperatures. Even when the outside temperature is 80 degrees, the inside of a car can heat up to more than 120 degrees in just minutes – even with the windows cracked! That’s why leaving your pet inside of a hot car is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke.

In following video, “Too Hot for Spot – Dangers of Hot Cars for Pets”, ARL’s shelter animals explain the risks of leaving your pet alone inside a parked car.

Click the “play” button below to watch:

Spot a pet alone in a parked car? Follow these 3 steps:

  1. Take down the car’s make, model, and license plate number.
  2. Ask nearby store managers or security guards to make an announcement to find the dog’s owner.
  3. If the owner can’t be found, call the non-emergency number of your local police department or Animal Control Officer.

Help us spread the word about this HOT summer safety issue! Stop by ARL’s shelters in Boston and Brewster this Summer and pick up a Too Hot for Spot car magnet!  A donation is appreciated by not required.

SPECIAL THANKS to our Too Hot for Spot media sponsor Animal Hospital of Orleans and our media partners Cool 102, WBZ 1030, NECN, WEEI-FM, WEEI-AM/ESPN, and WRKO-AM.

too hot for spot


Camping with Your Dog

Too Hot for Spot Tuesday: Tips for Safely Camping with Your Dog

Labor Day weekend is just around the corner! For those of us trying to squeeze in a last minute weekend trip before the dog days of summer slip away, it’s important to keep our pet’s safety in mind if we plan on bringing the pup along for the adventure.

Photo: Petswelcome.com

Photo: Petswelcome.com

Here are 6 tips that will help keep your dog safe during your next over-night camping trip :

  1. If your dog doesn’t regularly get flea/tick treatment, make sure you apply it at least a few days before the trip.
  2. Make sure that your pet has proper ID on his/her collar at all times and a reflective collar if he/she will be out on the campsite at night.
  3. Bring a pet first aid kit. It is always better to be prepared and often remote campsites will not have quick access to veterinary care. (We’ve been handing out pet emergency backpacks with pet first aid kits at our events)
  4. Do some research and locate the closest animal emergency clinic and add its contact information to your phone.
  5. Pet proof! Before you let your pet out on your campsite, thoroughly inspect the area to make sure other campers haven’t left anything behind like broken bottles or spoiled food.
  6. Don’t let your pet roam. Because your pet is not familiar with the area, he could get lost, fall into a river, or become stuck. Other well-meaning campers may feed him something toxic or may have rat poison out in their campsite. He also may have a run in with some not-so-well meaning wildlife.

For more summer safety tips visit: arlboston.org/summer-safety


Too Hot to Trot

Too Hot for Spot Tuesday: Tips for Safely Running with your Dog in the Summer

Exercising with your dog can be fun, but it’s important to adjust your running schedule in the summer to accommodate your pup. Running in the summer heat with your dog can be dangerous. We, humans, sweat in the summer, while our dog only has the ability to cool down with the pads of his feet and through panting. Your canine runner may be in excellent condition but overheating and heatstroke can be fatal for even the fittest canines.

Here are some tips to help keep your pup safe while you train:

  • toohotforspot_summerexerciseAdjust your running schedule to the early morning or late evening to avoid the hottest parts of the day.
  • Check the weather: It’s no fun to exercise on a 95-degree day with 80 percent humidity — for either one of you. Check the weather the night before and be flexible with your workout time, choosing cooler times of the day to get your run in. Your dog may be really sad and whine when you shut the door, but if it’s way too hot, it’s best to leave him at home where it’s cool.
  • Know your breed’s special health concerns: Short-muzzled breeds, like Bulldogs can overheat quickly.
  • Watch for signs of dehydration: Bring along a water bottle and a collapsible bowl, periodically giving your dog water breaks
  • Consider the surface: Asphalt and concrete can be too hot for furry feet, and rocks and gravel may cause cuts, so stick to dirt roads or sandy trails. After the run, check your dog’s pads for cracking or other injuries.

Remember, your dog can’t tell you when he’s tired, or thirsty. Keep a watchful eye on your dog, and notice whether he’s struggling to keep up, panting excessively, or limping. Take breaks throughout your workout to give him a chance to catch his breath, rest his muscles, and grab a few laps of water.

For more summer pet safety tips visit arlboston.org/summer-safety


What You Need to Know About Taking Your Dog to the Beach

Too Hot for Spot: Beach Safety Tips for You and Your Dog

Beach days can be a blast when you bring along a canine buddy, but taking a dog to the beach requires some preparation, know-how and a little common sense.

Whether your dog’s running around, jumping through waves, or just laying in the sun, it’s important to remember that anything that can harm you can harm Fido too including, sunburns, riptides, jellyfish, broken glass, sharp shells and aggressive dogs.

Here are some very important tips that will help your dog stay safe at the beach:

  • 07-22-14 Bringing Your Dog to the Beach PhotoProvide a shady retreat under a beach umbrella, tree or a make-shift tent.
  • Bring plenty of fresh, cool water and a dog bowl.
  • The sand can be scorching on sensitive paws, so offer a blanket or towel for your dog.
  • Take caution with short-muzzled breeds, like pugs, Boston terriers, and shih tzus. They can overheat very quickly.
  • Watch for signs of overheating. Symptoms may include: rapid panting and drooling, coordination problems, vomiting and/or diarrhea, collapse and loss of consciousness .
  • Avoid Sunburns: Short-coated dogs, light-colored dogs and those with pink noses can sunburn the same way that we do.
  • Keep a collar and ID tags on your dog at all times.
  • Check with your vet to make sure your dog is up-to-date on all vaccinations and licenses.

Lastly, follow beach rules! Many beaches don’t allow dogs in season or during peak hours. Remember that beach rules are actually laws, and can be punishable by a fine. Check online to make sure your beach allows dogs before you go and take notice of any rules posted near the beach.

Supervise your pet as you would a child, this will ensure that he’s safe and not bothering anyone who might not enjoy the company of a dog as much as you do.

Now that you’re prepared for a beach day, go have some fun in the sun with your canine pal!

For more information about summer pet safety visit arlboston.org/summer-safety.


How to Calm Your Dog During a Thunderstorm

Too Hot for Spot Tuesday Tip: Thunderstorm Dog Safety

If you’re like some dog owners, you’ve probably had several sleepless nights over the last week thanks to your dog’s “thunder phobia” resulting from the severe thunderstorms that have been plaguing the Northeast.

This fear can manifest in a variety of ways including – hiding, whining, scratching, slobbering, or destructive behavior – and it can get worse with age. Dogs possess special sensitivities that can make storms more terrifying. They can sense the change in air pressure, and may hear low-frequency rumblings that we, humans, can’t detect. 

07-08-14 Too Hot for Spot Tuesday- Thunderstorms Pic07-08-14 Thunderstorms PicSo, if you want to help calm your pup (and hopefully get some “shut-eye”) during the next thunderstorm, try these 5 tips:

  1. Stay with your dog if you can. Having you by his side will make him feel safer.
  2. If there are windows in the room, close the blinds or curtains, or cover the windows so the dog can’t see outside.
  3. Create a safe haven. Hiding is a natural instinct, so provide your dog with a safe indoor area, like a crate. If you have a wire crate, cover it with a light sheet. Leave the door open so your dog doesn’t feel trapped.
  4. Play calming music to drown out the thunder.
  5. Distract your dog. Try playing his favorite game and giving him treats. He might learn to associate storms with fun and play, rather than anxiety and fear.

If none of these work and your dog’s “thunder phobia” is really out of control, consult with your veterinarian.

For more summer pet safety tips visit: arlboston.org/summer-safety.