Watch & Share: It’s TOO HOT FOR SPOT

Leaving a pet alone inside a hot car can have dangerous consequences

To raise awareness for this HOT animal welfare issue, the Animal Rescue League of Boston and Boston Veterinary Care ask our followers and the media to share important information about the dangers of leaving pets in parked cars during the warm summer months.

Pets don’t sweat like humans do and cannot cool their bodies efficiently in hot temperatures. Even when the outside temperature is 80 degrees, the inside of a car can heat up to more than 120 degrees in just minutes – even with the windows cracked! That’s why leaving your pet inside of a hot car is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke.

In following video, “Too Hot for Spot – Dangers of Hot Cars for Pets”, ARL’s shelter animals explain the risks of leaving your pet alone inside a parked car.

Click the “play” button below to watch:

Spot a pet alone in a parked car? Follow these 3 steps:

  1. Take down the car’s make, model, and license plate number.
  2. Ask nearby store managers or security guards to make an announcement to find the dog’s owner.
  3. If the owner can’t be found, call the non-emergency number of your local police department or Animal Control Officer.

Help us spread the word about this HOT summer safety issue! Stop by ARL’s shelters in Boston and Brewster this Summer and pick up a Too Hot for Spot car magnet!  A donation is appreciated by not required.

SPECIAL THANKS to our Too Hot for Spot media sponsor Animal Hospital of Orleans and our media partners Cool 102, WBZ 1030, and NECN.

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It’s Too Hot for Spot! Signs of Heat Stroke

BVC answers your FAQs about this potentially fatal condition

All Summer long, the ARL has been sharing advice during our TOO HOT FOR SPOT campaign on how to

heat stroke

Never leave your pet alone in a parked car on a warm day- even with the windows cracked. It’s just TOO HOT FOR SPOT!

keep your pet safe in the warmer months. This week, we focus on identifying the symptoms of, and how to prevent heat stroke in your pet.

When temperatures begin to rise, so do concerns about animal safety. Even when the thermometer dips below 80 degrees, the threat for heat stroke still exists. Fortunately, pet owners who take the proper precautions can greatly reduce the risks of this potentially fatal condition.

Want to learn more? Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) answers some of your most FAQs:

Q. What is heat stroke?

A. Heat stroke is a serious condition caused by your pet’s body overheating, usually as a result of prolonged exposure to or physical exertion in high temperatures. Immediate medical attention by a veterinarian is required.

Q. What makes cats and dogs susceptible to heat stroke?

A: Pets don’t sweat the way humans do, which makes them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat. If their core body temperature rises too high (typically 104 degrees or higher), they run the risk of going into shock or organ failure.

Q. Which symptoms should I look for when trying to diagnose heat stroke in my pet?

A: More obvious symptoms of potential heatstroke in cats and dogs include: difficulty breathing, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness. More subtle symptoms include: heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, excessive thirst, lethargy.

Q. Is there anything I can do until my pet receives medical attention?

A: While you wait for assistance, apply cool wet towels to the groin and “underarm” areas. If your pet is alert enough, try having them slowly sip cold water. Even if your pet begins to appear better or more alert, you should still make an emergency visit to your pet’s veterinarian as only they will be able to diagnose whether or not your pet is suffering from heat stroke.

Q. How can I protect my cat or dog from getting heat stroke altogether?

A: Prevention is always your best bet. On hot days, leave your pet at home in a cool humidity and temperature-regulated room and keep them hydrated with a bowl of cold water accessible at all times. If your pet must be outdoors, find a shady spot with ample air flow and limit exercise to the morning or evening hours when temperatures are at their coolest.

Finally, never leave your pet alone in a parked car—even with the air conditioner on or the windows cracked. On an 85 degree day, the temperature inside a car can rise above 100 degrees in less than 10 minutes, which is why it is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke. It’s just TOO HOT FOR SPOT!

If you suspect that your pet is suffering from heat stroke, seek immediate medical attention from a veterinarian.

For more warm weather pet safety tips, visit arlboston.org/summer-safety

 

Tomorrow is Pints for Pups/Cocktails for Cats

Join ARL’s Brewster shelter tomorrow, Friday, July 31, from 6-9pm at the Cape Codder Resort in Hyannis, MA

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Join ARL’s Brewster shelter at Pints for Pups/Cocktails for Cats tomorrow, July 31!

Enjoy an evening of entertainment provided by WCAI-FM’s Brian Morris and the Capetunes, dinner, drinks, and bidding for exciting auction items – all while raising money for animals in need!

EVENT DETAILS
Friday, July 31
6pm-9pm
Cape Codder Resort
1225 Iyannough Road
Hyannis, MA 02601

Admission is $25 for adults, FREE for children 12 and under

Click here to purchase tickets. All proceeds benefit animals in need through Cold Noses Foundation, Inc., New England Society for Abandoned Animals, and the ARL’s Brewster Shelter.

THANK YOU to Cold Noses Foundation for making the ARL’s Brewster shelter a charity recipient of this year’s Pints for Pups/Cocktails for Cats event!


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National Clear the Shelters Day is August 15

Be a hero and ADOPT a Super Pet during this nationwide event

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and New England Cable News Network (NECN) have joined forces to encourage the public to visit local animal shelters and adopt a pet on Saturday, August 15, 2015 for national Clear the Shelters Day.

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ARL super pets (like Inky) are waiting to meet you!

Thanks to the support of NECN’s parent company NBC Universal, animal shelters across the country will open their doors with a special mission: to find as many animals as possible  loving homes this summer. ARL’s shelters in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham will be participating in this one-day-only event.

“Summer is the busiest time of year for animal shelters,” explains Maryann Regan, director of shelter operations at the ARL. “Having the support of NECN and NBC Universal to raise awareness about adoption during this time of year is incredibly important to finding safe and caring homes as quickly as possible for as many animals as we can.”

On August 15, the ARL will offer a Super Pet adoption special at all locations – $50 OFF the regular adoption fees of all adult cats and dogs 1 year and older.  Adopters can also take home an ARL Super Pet Pack along with their new furry companion, while supplies last.

All adoptable animals at the ARL also receive the following included in their adoption fee: spay or neuter services, a full medical screening, vaccinations, a microchip, and a behavioral evaluation.

For more information about adopting from the ARL on Clear the Shelters Day, visit arlboston.org.

Participating ARL locations include:

ARL Boston Shelter 10 Chandler Street, Boston
Phone: (617) 426-9170
Hours: 1:00 pm – 6:30 pm

ARL Brewster Shelter 3981 Main St (Rte 6A), East Brewster
Phone: (508) 255-1030
Hours: 1:00 pm – 6:30 pm

ARL Mobile Adoption Event
Petco – look for the ARL’s mobile adoption vehicle in the parking lot! 1210 Providence Highway (Route 1), Norwood
Hours:
11:00 am – 5:00 pm

The ARL is one of several shelters in Massachusetts taking part in Clear the Shelter Day activities.  For a list of all participating locations, visit NECN.com.

THANK YOU to our media partners NBCUniversal, NECN, WBZ 1030, and Clear Channel for helping to spread the word about the importance of animal adoptions.

…and to the ASPCA for making the Animal Rescue League of Boston a grant recipient for Clear the Shelters Day.

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5 Tips for Dog Swimming Safety

Advice to keep your pup (and family!) safe and secure in the water

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Did you know… dogs can still overheat even when in the water? Remember these 5 dog swimming safety tips during your next visit to your local watering hole.

All summer long, the ARL is sharing advice on how to protect your pet in the warmer months because some hot weather situations can just be TOO HOT FOR SPOT. With temperatures soaring this week, we focus on keeping your dog safe as you cool off swimming!

Whether it’s your backyard or neighborhood pool, creek, pond, or beach, taking a dip on these hot summer days can be an enjoyable and refreshing experience for both you and your canine companion.

Just as there are risks for any human during a swim session, the same goes for your pet. Preparedness and attentiveness are key to making sure that every member of the family practices water safety.

Here are 5 important dog swimming safety tips to keep in mind this summer:

1. Not all dogs can swim. Although one of the first swimming strokes we learn as humans is coined the “doggy paddle”, it does not necessarily mean that all dogs can swim.

In fact, some dogs may never feel comfortable in the water. Certain breeds with short snouts or broad compact bodies such as American bulldogs and pugs  are not always “naturals” when it comes to swimming and may require “lessons.”

Buying your pet a life vest flotation device is a great investment and will keep your pup afloat while you teach them to swim—and help support them later on should they get themselves into a watery situation.

2. Practice, practice, practice. Tossing a stick or a ball in the water, progressively further from shore or shallow steps is a good way to teach your pooch to feel comfortable in the water. When they’re ready for a real swim session, move on to a small pool or other contained body of water.

While some dogs may eager to jump right in, others may panic, so be prepared for either scenario.  If there’s only one set of stairs or a ramp, continue to refresh your pup’s memory about the quickest way to make an exit.

3. Limit access to bodies of water. Just as you would keep unsupervised children a safe distance with a gate or fence, the same should go for your canine companion. If a physical barrier isn’t possible, make sure your dog knows how to come when called in case they get too close to a body of water that they shouldn’t be near.

Taking your pup boating? During the day, be sure your dog is wearing a life vest at all times. At night, your canine companion should be kept securely in an inside room on the boat, as it may be too dark to locate them should they jump or fall overboard.

4. Supervise your dog at all times. Even strong swimmers can get into trouble, especially if they’re tired. Always take notice of your pooch’s energy level and call them in for frequent breaks. Have fresh water available and encourage them to drink whenever possible; dogs can still overheat when swimming!

Supervision is especially important if your dog is swimming in a river or ocean with a lot of movement. Before you allow Fido to jump in, take note of the current and tide, and check the water temperature. Look for any flags or postings related to potential swimming hazards. Even if water conditions look ideal, always make sure that you pup stays close to shore, so that you have the ability to react quickly should they get into trouble.

5. Beware of ear infections. After swimming, be sure to dry your pup’s ears thoroughly and carefully with a cotton ball. Since most dogs have ear canals that point straight down, it is easy for water and bacteria to get trapped, causing a painful ear infection.

Common symptoms of an ear infection in dogs include excessive ear scratching or rubbing against floor or furniture, redness, swelling, odor or discharge coming from the ear canal, unbalanced movement, and hearing loss. If you see signs of an ear infection, contact your dog’s veterinarian right away.

TOO HOT FOR SPOT!  For more summer safety tips, visit arlboston.org/summer-safety

 

Pints for Pups/Cocktails for Cats is July 31

ARL’s Brewster shelter is charity recipient for this year’s event

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Join ARL’s Brewster shelter at Pints for Pups/Cocktails for Cats on Friday, July 31!

THANK YOU to Cold Noses Foundation for making the ARL’s Brewster shelter a charity recipient of this year’s Pints for Pups/Cocktails for Cats on Friday, July 31, 2015 from 6pm-9pm at the Cape Codder Resort in Hyannis, Massachusetts.

Enjoy an evening of entertainment provided by WCAI-FM’s Brian Morris and the Capetunes, dinner, drinks, and bidding for exciting auction items – all while raising money for animals in need!

EVENT DETAILS
Friday, July 31
6pm-9pm
Cape Codder Resort
1225 Iyannough Road
Hyannis, MA 02601

Admission is $25 for adults, FREE for children 12 and under

Click here to purchase tickets. All proceeds benefit animals in need through Cold Noses Foundation, Inc., New England Society for Abandoned Animals, and the ARL’s Brewster Shelter.

Want to get a head start on fundraising? The Pints for Pups/Cocktails for Cats online auction opens on Friday, July 24 and ends at the live event on Friday, July 31. Click here for more information.

PUT YOUR PAWS TOGETHER FOR…..

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Behind-the-Scenes at Barks & Bagels 2015

Thank you to our supporters and sponsors for a great event!

Charlie the Australian Kelpie mix at ARL Barks & Bagels

Brewster shelter manager, Sandy Luppi, and adoption agent, Veronica Samento, discuss the importance of adopting “Super Pets” like Charlie, a 1-year-old Australian Kelpie mix.

Last week, ARL’s Brewster Shelter held it’s very first Barks & Bagels event on a beautiful sunny day in Cape Cod.

The free community event kicked off with attendees mingling amongst ARL shelter and pet safety informational booths, including the “Too Hot for Spot” table, sponsored by Animal Hospital of Orleans– all while enjoying delicious treats from breakfast sponsors Friends’ Marketplace, JoMama’s, and Dunkin’ Donuts.

Click here to see photos from the event

Afterward, the crowd moved on to behind-the-scenes guided tours of ARL’s Brewster shelter and Spay Waggin’! During the shelter tour, attendees had the opportunity to meet all of the amazing cats, dogs, birds, guinea pigs, chinchillas, and even chickens currently residing at the ARL.

Our staff walked attendees through every step that the shelter takes with each animal to ensure the best quality of care. One group received an extra special surprise on their tour- an adoptable chicken laid a perfect egg right in front of their eyes!

Dr. Quigley gives tour of ARL's Spay Waggin' during Barks & Bagels

ARL’s lead shelter veterinarian, Dr. Quigley, gave Barks & Bagels attendees a behind-the-scenes tour of ARL’s Spay Waggin’, which primarily services Cape Cod and the South Shore.

During the Spay Waggin’ tour, everyone was in awe of all of the medical equipment on board, and were impressed to learn that the Spay Waggin’ has accommodated as many as 60 cats in one day!

Dr. Quigley, ARL’s lead shelter veterinarian, spoke about the importance of spaying and neutering our pets and all of the ways that the ARL’s work has positively impacted the animals and residents of Cape Cod since 1921.

Barks & Bagels concluded with an adorable shelter dog show, during which Brewster shelter manager, Sandy Luppi, and assistant shelter manager, Dawn Lee-Laub, discussed the importance of animal adoption and what makes the ARL unique.

One-by-one, adoption agent, Veronia Sarmento, brought out adoptable dogs, while Sandy and Dawn described each dog’s unique personality traits and their special journey to the ARL. The crowd loved interacting with each dog, and a few were lucky enough to enjoy some slobbery canine kisses!

A big THANK YOU to our sponsors Animal Hospital of Orleans, Friends’ Marketplace, JoMama’s, and Dunkin’ Donuts for supporting such a successful event!

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7 Steps to Keep Your Dog Safe at the Park

Protect your pup from harm and health risks by following these important planning and safety tips

One of the most enjoyable activities during the summer months is a leisurely trip to your local park. Whether it’s for a picnic or a stroll, Fido will be more than happy to tag along!

A park can be an ideal venue for your dog to get the mental stimulation and physical exercise that they crave. All of the open space, fresh air, unique smells, and various types of people and animals can be a very exciting and stimulating experience for your pooch.

Of course, all the stimulation and interaction with unfamiliar people and dogs–not to mention the heat and humidity–can be hard on your pup.

dog safety

Remember to keep an eye on your dog at ALL times!

In order to make sure the fun trip to the park you have planned stays that way for everyone in the family, follow these 7 steps:

  1. Choose your park wisely. Whether you’re planning to lay out a blanket and stay a while or just to take a stroll, select a park with plenty of shade and bring fresh drinking water. Your dog may not signal you when they’re overheated or tired, so build in frequent breaks in the shade for rest and re-hydration.  If you see signs of heatstroke, contact your pet’s veterinarian right away!
  2. Leave the retractable leash at home. The “locking” mechanism on a retractable leash can be tricky and an unreliable way to keep your dog close by.  Use a standard 4-6’ leash and you’ll be able to prevent or gain control of a potentially risky situation more quickly.  After all, any dog who sees a squirrel across a nearby street becomes a flight risk!  Very seriously, dog bites occur much more frequently in the warmer months due to heightened arousal from the heat, crowds, and smells.  A short leash will help prevent them from making uninvited contact with other dogs or children.
  3. Keep an eye on your dog at ALL times. Remain attentive, especially if you’re visiting an off-leash dog park, which can quickly turn into a stressful situation for your pet. Observe the other dogs and people in the park and your pup’s body language when they interact with them. Remember that even a dog that your pooch knows well can have an unexpected reaction, as the group dynamic can change any time a new dog enters or leaves the park.
  4. Plan early morning or evening outings. Between the hours of 10am-4pm, the sun and temperature is at its peak. Aim to limit outdoor exercise to breakfast and dinnertime so that Fido (and you!) doesn’t overheat. Remember, pets don’t sweat the way humans do, making them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat.
  5. Keep up-to-date on all vaccinations and parasite preventatives. This is especially important if your pup is interacting with other dogs. Respiratory illnesses like canine tracheobronchitis (kennel cough) and harmful parasites like heartworm, can easily spread from one dog to another. If you’re not certain if your pet’s vaccinations are current, contact your veterinarian.
  6. Pick up after your pup. Not only is it the “considerate” thing to do, but it’s also the sanitary thing to do. Many intestinal parasites, such as tapeworm and whipworm, can easily spread from one dog to another.  Like it or not, dogs sometimes do a little too much up close investigation into the interesting smells they encounter!  Many parks come equipped with garbage disposals and some even with pet waste bags, in case you run out.
  7. Consider leaving Fido at home. While many of us consider pets to be family and want to include them in every outing, the reality is that some events can be just too stressful on your pooch. If you plan to visit a crowded area or a lengthy event at the park–especially if you know your dog is shy or snippy when he or she first meets other people and dogs–the best decision for you and your pet is to leave them safely at home.

Summer can be TOO HOT FOR SPOT! No matter what the circumstance, remember to never leave your pet alone in a parked car—even with the air conditioner on or the windows cracked. On an 85 degree day, the temperature inside a car can rise above 100 degrees in less than 10 minutes, which is why it is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke

For more warm weather dog safety tips, visit arlboston.org/summer-safety

 

Postponed: Today’s Canines & Cocktails Event

Please check back for updates on a rain date

The Canines & Cocktails event scheduled for tonight, July 14, at the Seaport Hotel Boston had been CANCELLED due to the threat of inclement weather. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause!

If you had already purchased tickets through Eventbrite, you will be contacted today via email with further instructions.

 

 

Have No Fear; Super Pets are Here!

5 heroic reasons to ADOPT a super pet

Question: What is a “Super Pet”?

Answer: An awesome shelter animal looking for a family to shower with love, affection, loyalty, and companionship!

The Humane Society of America estimates that 6 to 8 million pets end up in animal shelters every year, due primarily to housing issues, such as moving and landlord restrictions.

Summer is the busiest season in our shelters in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham, making July and August a sensational time to save a life and adopt a shelter animal!

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Here are 5 heroic reasons to adopt your very own Super Pet:

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Josephina loves purring up a storm for treats! This super girl is available for adoption at our Boston shelter. Click her photo for more info.

  1. You will give a deserving animal a home. Your compassion will help give a shelter pet a safe loving home and your adoption fee will help even more animals in need.
  2. You will have help finding a devoted sidekick. Every animal at the ARL receives individualized behavioral assessments and enrichment programs. Our staff learns as much as possible about each animal so they can help adopters find the perfect pet for their family and lifestyle.
  3. You will save money. At the ARL, all this is included in your pet’s adoption fee:  spay or neuter services, health screening and veterinary examination, behavior screening and evaluations, vaccinations and flea/tick/mite treatment, and microchip identification and registration.
  4. You will feel like a hero. When you adopt, you give an animal a chance at a better life. Your shelter pet will thank you constantly with tons of affection and by becoming your new best friend.
  5. You will support responsible pet ownership. When searching for an animal companion, always consider the source and the support you will get following the adoption if you have any questions.  The ARL, for example, has a behavior helpline and shelter staff can answer questions for you after you take your pet home.

For more information on adoptable animals available at the ARL, please contact one of our shelters:

Boston: 10 Chandler Street, Boston, MA 02116 | (617) 426-9170 | Tuesday–Sunday, 1-6:30PM, excluding some holidays

Upcoming event: Clear the Shelter Day on August 15

Brewster: 3981 Main St., East Brewster, MA 02631 | (508) 255-1030 | Tuesday–Sunday, 1-6:30PM, excluding some holidays

Upcoming event: Barks & Bagels from 11AM-1PM on July 17

Dedham: 55 Anna’s Pl, Dedham, MA 02026 | (781) 326-0729 | As of June 16, the Dedham shelter is CLOSED for renovations

Not to worry! Mobile adoptions will take place every Wednesday at the Dedham Farmers’ Market from 12-6PM, weather permitting. Available dogs, cats, and small animals will be on site.