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Category: Brewster
Hot off the Press: Our Four-Footed Friends

Check out the Spring/Summer 2016 edition here!

ARL’s latest edition of Our Four-Footed Friends, includes news and photos of all the critical work for animals you helped support.

Our Four-Footed Friends Spring/Summer 2016 edition

Click on the image above to read the full Spring/Summer 2016 edition of Our Four-Footed Friends!

Click here or the image at right to view the full Spring/Summer 2016 OFFF magazine.

What’s inside…

  • How your support positively impacted ARL shelter pets in 2016!
  • The steps ARL is taking to advocate for animals- and what you can do to help!
  • A recap of National Spay/Neuter Awareness Month!
  • “Happy tail” & winter rescue success stories!
  • And much more!

 

 


Whiskers & Wine: ARL Toasts its Biggest Supporters

THANK YOU to our 400+ President’s Council donors for making our important work possible!

On the evening of May 12, 2016, over 125 of ARL’s biggest supporters came together at the historic Fairmont Copley Plaza in Boston for the second annual Whiskers & Wine President’s Council Spring Social. See photos from last night’s event.

ARL’s corporate sponsors, Board of Directors, Leadership Council, President’s Council (those who donate $1K or more annually), volunteers, and staff toasted its most committed supporters for making our important work possible.

Click here or on the “play” button below to watch a video about the over 13,400 animals in need they helped in 2015!

Royalty Free Music from Bensound

Throughout the evening, guests mingled with fellow animal lovers over sparkling wine and delicious hors d’oeuvres. During the speaking program, key members from the ARL discussed the impact that our donors’ generosity has had on the thousands of animals who receive care through ARL’s programs and services each year.

Malcolm McDonald, ARL’s Board Chair, kicked off the evening with a big THANK YOU to everyone who made last night’s event– and our very important work possible. He also spoke about being the proud pet parent of two special ARL alum, his dog Hazel and his cat Max, without whom he couldn’t imagine his life without!

Dr. Kyle Quigley,  ARL’s Lead Veterinarian of Community Veterinary Services, Brian O’Connor, ARL’s Manager of Rescue Services, and Debby Vogel, ARL’s Manager of Volunteer and Educational Programs, shared very personal and heartfelt stories about how their individual programs positively impacted an animal in need.

From a woman desperate to get her cat spayed in the middle of a snowstorm, to a dog named Faith that was rescued after 7 weeks of being on the run, to a dog named CJ who helped get a young man get through a very difficult time, there were many laughs and even some tears shared amongst the crowd.

President Mary Nee also gave a glimpse into ARL’s exciting vision for the future. “Tonight, I am pleased to share with you our newly adopted statement of mission, the foundation that will guide our programs and plans in the years to come: We are an unwavering champion for animals in need, committed to keeping them safe and healthy in habitats and homes… It’s because of people like YOU who support this work, that most animals will able to live safely and healthy in their habitats and homes.”

Walter Kenyon, ARL’s Leadership Council Chair, closed the evening by sharing his excitement for following up with President’s Council members in the weeks ahead about the details of this bold new vision.

VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO… Our generous donors for expressing your love of animals, compassion, and kindness through your support of the Animal Rescue League of Boston!

…and to our corporate supporters of Whiskers & Wine 2016…

BIG DOG SPONSORS
Blue Hills Bank
Katherine Burdon
David McGrath
Anonymous

TOP CAT SPONSORS
Mintz Levin
Malcolm McDonald & Susan Passoni
Nancy Z. Bender

PUPPY PAL SPONSORS
AAF CPAs
Grossman Marketing Group
MFS
Risk Strategies Company
STV | DPM
Carol Akerson & Rich Kelly
Doug Zeghibe
Jane & Andy Urban
Lee Ann, Mike, and Mia Leahy

FELINE FRIEND SPONSOR
Bowditch & Dewey
East Boston Savings Bank
Gibson Sotheby’s International Realty
Kirkiles & Associates Commercial Insurance Brokerage, LLC
Russo’s
Sullivan & Worcester
Kenn Freed
Mark J. Lanza, Esq.
The Fairmont Copley Plaza


USSC Increases Animal Fighting Penalties

ARL sent a proposal to the USSC urging higher guidelines for individuals found guilty of federal animal fighting crimes

Earlier this month, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) reported that the United States Sentencing Commission (USSC) was considering increasing penalties for animal fighting.

The ARL believes that these higher guidelines will help deter any potential offenders, and help to protect animals like Turtle from becoming “bait dogs”.

The ARL believes that these higher guidelines will help deter any potential offenders, and help to protect animals like Turtle from becoming “bait dogs”.

Click here to learn more.

The ARL, along with countless other animal welfare organizations, sent letters urging the USSC to consider higher sentencing ranges for individuals found guilty of federal animal fighting crimes.

Our voice was heard!

On April 15, 2016, the USSC voted unanimously to approve increases for the sentencing penalties associated with animal fighting. Previously, the range was 6 to 12 months in federal prison; the range is now 21 to 27 months in federal prison.

The USSC also authorized judges to impose upward departures – sentences above the usual range – for those cases where:

  • The suffering of animals was prolonged.
  • The fighting enterprise was on an exceptional scale (an exceptionally large number of animals was involved in the fighting enterprise).

The ARL believes that these higher guidelines will help deter any potential offenders, and help to protect animals like Turtle from becoming “bait dogs”.

It is for Turtle and so many other animals like her that the ARL continues to urge that those who are responsible for such harm and cruelty are brought to justice.

TAKE ACTION FOR ANIMALS! Learn the 7 most common warning signs of animal cruelty and report any suspicious activity to your local authorities.


ARL Saves Baby Owl and Kittens during Snowstorm

All in a day’s work: Rescue Services helps newborn critters in New England

A group of kittens in a humane cat trap

ARL’s Rescue Services pulled nine kittens from an old work duct in Jamaica Plain. The kittens are now safe in ARL’s foster care!

On Monday, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Rescue Service team, Danielle Genter and Mike Brammer responded to a call for help from an employee of the VA Hospital in Jamaica Plain, MA.

The concerned citizen contacted the ARL when the feral cat that she feeds on Monday mornings did not come out as usual. She could, however, hear the animal whimpering and assumed it was stuck somewhere outdoors.

ARL’s Rescue team arrived on the scene and quickly identified two holes near the building. During their initial inspection, they looked into the holes and took photographs, but did not hear anything. Shortly after placing food inside the hole, however, they heard a faint meow coming from one of the holes.

ARL’s expert rescue technicians, Danielle Genter and Mike Brammer, try to place the baby owl back in its nest.

ARL’s expert rescue technicians, Danielle Genter and Mike Brammer, attempt to return the baby owl to its nest.

Read the full story, as reported by Boston.com.

After pulling one kitten out of the small hole under the building, Danielle and Mike were in for a surprise: in total they found nine 4-week-old kittens taking cover from the storm inside the old duct work!

“Gradually, one by one, we pulled all nine kittens out. We were there for about an hour trying to catch them,” says Mike.

Although cold and hungry, all nine kittens were in perfect heath and were transferred to ARL’s foster care program where they’ll stay until they’re old enough to be put up for adoption.

Earlier in the week, the kittens’ feral cat mom had also been taken into ARL’s Boston shelter for spay surgery and later released.

Meanwhile…

While in Jamaica Plain, the Rescue Team also responded to the Arnold Arboretum where a small baby owl was found on the ground below its nest. At first, Danielle and Mike attempted to return the owl to its home.

With the help of arboretum staff and a bucket truck, the baby owl was returned to its nest where its two siblings were waiting. The team was packing up and ready to leave when someone spotted the baby owl on the ground- again! It had either fallen, or been kicked out by its siblings.

Read the full story, as reported by Boston.com.

With the threat of freezing overnight temperatures coming in and the possible predators that could harm the young bird, the team ultimately determined that the baby owl would be safest at the Blue Hill’s Trailside Museum in Milton, MA.

Learn more about ARL’s Field Services team.


ARL Urges USSC to Impose Higher Guidelines for Animal Fighting Cases

The proposal would protect animals like Turtle from becoming “bait dogs”

animal fighting

BEFORE: Turtle was found severely injured and cruelly abandoned on the side of the road in 2009. AFTER: Today, Turtle is happy, healthy, and loving life with her new family!

Animal fighting is not a crime that just happens ‘someplace else’.

Sadly, the brutality and suffering that result from animal fighting are all too familiar to the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL). Each year, ARL’s law enforcement department, rescue team, and shelter veterinarians and staff are called in to help domesticated animals and wildlife in Massachusetts found in these extreme situations.

One of the most inhumane cases that we’ve encountered was that of Turtle, the Pit Bull-type dog who had been left for dead on the side of the road.

In December 2009, the ARL responded to a call about an injured dog in Hyde Park, MA. Turtle was discovered lying curled up and motionless in the bitter cold. Her body was covered with old bite wounds that had been inexpertly stitched, as well as dozens of new bites on her face and underbelly, and a fractured leg. All of these were classic signs of a “bait dog” used in dogfighting.

Turtle received emergency medical attention and surgery to stabilize her condition. Afterward, she underwent months of long and strenuous physical and behavioral rehabilitation at the ARL.

The ARL proposes higher guidelines for animal fighting cases…

It’s because of dogs like Turtle, and so many other animals used for blood sports, that the ARL recently sent a letter to the United States Sentencing Commission (USSC) urging higher guidelines for individuals found guilty of federal animal fighting crimes.

Although the maximum penalty for animal fighting was raised to 5 years in federal prison in 2007, the guidelines used to determine the actual sentence length had not changed. This means that those convicted for animal fighting may not have received any jail time at all.

Turtle fully recovered and listening intently to ARL's President Mary Nee at the State House during Lobby Day 2014!

Turtle fully recovered and listening intently to ARL’s President Mary Nee at the State House during Lobby Day 2014!

Based upon our own experience, as well as that of other law enforcement agencies, the ARL has proposed that the USSC:

  • Consider adding additional penalty levels for animal fighting crimes where guns and/or drugs were involved.
  • Urge the sentencing judge to consider other factors to impose a higher sentence, such as extreme cruelty or failure to provide adequate shelter, food, and medical care.

The ARL believes that these new proposals would result in longer sentences and appropriately punish a current offender and possibly deter any potential offenders.

Turtle was lucky that she was found in time to save. Her recovery is a testament to her own strength and courage, as well as the wonderful veterinary and rehabilitative care she received at the ARL.

It is for Turtle and so many other animals like her that ARL continues to fight and urge that those who are responsible for such harm and cruelty are brought to justice.

TAKE ACTION FOR ANIMALS! Learn the 7 most common warning signs of animal cruelty and report any suspicious activity to your local authorities.


ARL Recovers 18 Game Birds from Tewksbury Home

Suspects arraigned in connection with illegal animal fighting ring

Earlier this week, 24 suspects were arrested and arraigned for their suspected involvement in an illegal cockfighting ring in Tewksbury, Massachusetts.

ARL's manager of rescue services, Brian O'Connor, helped recover 18 modern game birds from the illegal cockfighting ring in Tewksbury, MA. Photo courtesy of the Tewksbury police department

Lt. Alan Borgal, director of law enforcement at the ARL, and Brian O’Connor (pictured), manager of rescue services at the ARL, helped recover 18 modern game birds from the illegal cockfighting ring in Tewksbury, MA. Photo courtesy of the Tewksbury police department.

The Tewksbury Police Department acted on a tip that multiple people were gambling on a “cock fight” at the residence of 969 Chandler Street.

When officials entered the home surrounded by surveillance equipment, they discovered 24 people participating in a “cock fight”. Several packages of spurs, kits with tape, and over $13,000 in cash, were also found on the scene.

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), Tewksbury Animal Control, and the Massachusetts Environmental Police were called in for help.

“There were 18 modern game birds involved,” says Lt. Alan Borgal, director of law enforcement at the ARL. “Many of them had artificial plastic spurs attached to their legs to inflict more damage to one another during the fight.”

Sadly, 5 of the modern game birds were critically injured and did not survive. The remaining 13 birds are in the custody and control of the ARL’s law enforcement department.

On Monday, all 24 suspects were arraigned in Lowell District Court on charges of cruelty to animals and being present at an animal fight. The two organizers of the cockfighting ring were also charged with keeping or promoting an animal fight.

SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING – We all have a role to play in prevention! Report suspicions of animal cruelty, abandonment, neglect to your local authorities. Learn more at arlboston.org/take-action


ARL’s Dr. Schettino answers FAQs about spay/neuter

ARL’s Dr. Schettino answers FAQs about spay/neuter

Let’s face it: there’s nothing cool about pet overpopulation.

Dr. Edward Schettino with Moose, an ARL alum from the Boston shelter.

Dr. Edward Schettino with Moose, an ARL alum from the Boston shelter.

According to Dr. Edward Schettino, ARL’s vice president of animal welfare, a large portion of the animals coming to ARL shelters every year are a result of unplanned or abandoned litters of puppies and kittens. “If we can increase spay and neuter rates then we can help prevent pet overpopulation in a very humane way.”

Despite all the health benefits of spaying and neutering pets, approximately one third of pet owners still have not brought their pet in to have the procedure.

Dr. Schettino believes that lack of affordable options and lingering myths and misconceptions about the low-risk surgery are two major barriers to increasing spay and neuter rates. In fact, the ARL frequently addresses these concerns with clients at our Boston Veterinary Care clinic and Spay Waggin’.

ARL Blog sat down with Dr. Schettino to find out the most FAQs about spay and neuter. Here’s what he had to say…

ARL Blog: What do you say to a pet owner who’s concerned that spay or neuter surgery is painful?

Dr. Schettino (DS): Pain is associated with every surgery. At the ARL, we use pain medication before, during, and after surgery to make the procedure as pain-free as possible. The majority of dogs and cats are acting 100% normal by the next morning. In fact, the challenging part to the surgery is trying to keep the dog or cat rested when they feel so good.

ARL Blog: Is spay or neuter surgery expensive? What are the local low-cost options/clinics in the area?

DS: Spay/neuter surgeries vary in price depending on location and provider – here’s a link with some great resources – massanimalcoalition.com/resources/spay-neuter. Our Spay Waggin’ also provides affordable spay and neuter services to animals in need on the South Shore and Cape Cod. You can also check with your local veterinarian.

ARL Blog: At what age should dogs/cats be spayed/neutered?

DS: Many veterinarians now spay and neuter dogs and cats as young as eight weeks of age. You should check with your veterinarian about the appropriate time for these procedures. And remember, it’s never too late to spay or neuter your pet!

ARL Blog: Should pet owners be concerned that their pet’s behaviors will change after the surgery? Will a male dog, for example, be less of a protector?

DS: Your pet’s behavior will not change. A dog’s personality is formed more by genetics and environment than by sex hormones. It is a dog’s natural instinct to protect the home and family.

ARL Blog: What can people to do help end animal overpopulation?

DS: Spay and neuter your pet! Always talk to family and friends and explain to them the benefits of spay/neuter–tell them it’s hip to snip! Help them understand that this will benefit their pet as well as help prevent animal overpopulation. Additionally, people can donate to their favorite animal welfare charity to help support  spay/neuter efforts.

 

For more spay and neuter resources, visit arlboston.org/spay-neuter.


The ARL Welcomes Nadine Pellegrini

Former Assistant U.S. Attorney to serve as ARL’s new director of advocacy

Please join us in welcoming aboard Nadine Pellegrini, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s very first director of advocacy! In her new role, Nadine will provide leadership and direction on our organization’s advocacy agenda.

A Natick-resident, Nadine is an animal lover who has two pet dogs and a horse. Her passion for animal welfare rounds out the many talents she brings to the ARL.

nadine pellegirini

“I’m honored to join an organization that does so much to support the health and safety of animals in our community,” says Nadine Pellegrini, ARL’s director of advocacy.

“I’m honored to join an organization that does so much to support the health and safety of animals in our community,” says Nadine. “The opportunity to help advance laws and programs that prevent cruelty, neglect, and abuse is especially meaningful to me professionally and personally.”

Nadine worked on a variety of cases during her 20 years with the U.S. Attorney’s office in Boston. Most recently, she was a member of the U.S. Attorney’s anti-terrorism unit and on the prosecution team for United States vs. Dzhokar Tsarnaev.

She also served as chief of the major crimes unit, prosecuting cases involving enforcement of the Endangered Species Act, Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and more.

After receiving her law degree from Albany Law School of Union University, a keen interest in animal protection led Nadine to pursue a master of science degree in animals and public policy from the Tufts Center for Animals and Public Policy (CAPP) at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.

Nadine also taught animal law at Boston College Law School and given lectures on federal wildlife protection at CAPP.

Nadine’s extensive knowledge of law enforcement and experience prosecuting crimes will help immenselyas the ARL moves legislation and policy discussion forward to improve the protection and treatment of animals in Massachusetts,” explains Mary Nee, president of the ARL.

Please help us give a warm welcome to Nadine Pellegrini, ARL’s first director of advocacy!


Happening Now: ARL Hosts Free Spay-Neuter-A-Thon

ARL spays/neuters 52 Cape Cod animals in need on World Spay Day

Early this morning, ARL’s Spay Waggin’ pulled into Falmouth, MA to host it’s very first Free Hip to Snip Free Spay-Neuter-A-Thon on the 22nd annual World Spay Day.

The last Tuesday of every February, National World Spay Day shines a spotlight on the power of affordable, accessible spay/neuter to prevent pet overpopulation.

Thanks to a generous grant from Cold Noses Foundation, the ARL’s Spay Waggin’ is providing free spay and neuter services to animals in need on Cape Cod. The mobile surgical unit will be stationed outside of the Petco in Falmouth today and tomorrow.

Dr. Kyle Quigley, lead veterinarian at the ARL, helped spay and neuter over xxx animals on the Spay Waggin' in 2015!

DID YOU KNOW… that the ARL’s Spay Waggin’ provides high-quality, affordable spay and neuter services to cats and dogs on Cape Cod and the South Shore? Dr. Kyle Quigley, lead veterinarian at the ARL, spayed and neutered over 260 animals on the Cape in 2015!

During the event, Dr. Kyle Quigley, lead veterinarian for community veterinary services at the ARL, will welcome a total of 52 cat and dog patients aboard the Spay Waggin’.

“Spaying or neutering your cat or dog offers very important health benefits, yet finding affordable options can pose a challenge for many pet owners on Cape Cod,” says Dr. Quigley.

He explains that one of the ARL’s goals for the Hip to Snip Free Spay-Neuter-A-Thon is to help Cape Cod residents looking for an affordable option to learn more about the exceptional care pets receive on the Spay Waggin’.

In 2016, the Spay Waggin’ will visit Cape Cod on the third Tuesday of every month. Visits will rotate between Petco in Falmouth and The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) in Yarmouth. To view the schedule, visit arlboston.org/spay-waggin.

ONLY YOU CAN MAKE THIS WORK POSSIBLE!

The Ellen B. Gray Memorial Fund has challenged us to turn a generous $5,000 donation into $20,000 before the end of February to bring spay and neuter services to more animals in need!

All funds donated during the It’s Hip to Snip Fund Drive now through February 29 will benefit the ARL’s community spay and neuter programs including the Spay Waggin’.

The ARL receives no government or public funding to provide spay and neuter services to animals in need  — ONLY YOU can make this important work possible!

donatenowbutton

VERY SPECIAL THANKS to our challenge donor, The Ellen B. Gray Memorial Fund; Da Vinci Ristorante; our media sponsors and partners Friends of Jake and Liam, WBZ, WEEI, WRKO, WZLX, 98.5 The Sports Hub, and WBOS; and everyone who made a donation to support ARL’s spay and neuter programs during the It’s Hip to Snip Fund Drive!

For more spay and neuter resources, visit arlboston.org/spay-neuter.


Debunked: Common Spay and Neuter Myths

ARL’s Dr. Schettino shares the awesome truth about spaying/neutering your pet

IT’S HIP TO SNIP! The ARL wants to break down barriers to getting pets spayed and neutered this February during National Spay/Neuter Awareness Month.

According to Dr. Schettino, vice president of animal welfare at the ARL, the cost of spay and neuter surgery is a major barrier for many pet owners. Spay and neuter surgery at a private veterinary clinic in Massachusetts can range up to several hundred dollars.

To bring affordable spay and neuter services to more animals in need, the Ellen B. Gray Memorial Fund has challenged us to raise $20,000 in just 14 days during the It’s Hip to Snip Fund Drive. All donations made during the fund drive will benefit the ARL’s community spay/neuter programs including the Spay Waggin,’ the ARL’s mobile surgical unit.

DONATE NOW to bring spay and neuter services to more animals in need.

Many misconceptions pet owners have about the low-risk surgery also stand in the way of increasing spay and neuter rates.

In a recent Twitter chat, Dr. Schettino debunked the 7 most common spay/neuter myths:

Myth #1: I don’t want my male dog or cat to feel like “less of a male.”
Fact: Pets don’t have any concept of sexual identity or ego. Neutering will not change a pet’s basic personality.

Myth #2: I want my children/family to see my pets experience the miracle of birth.
Fact: Complications can and do occur during the birthing process. Teach children/family members that all life is precious and by spaying and neutering your pet, he/she will lead a healthier, longer life.

Myth #3: It’s better to have one litter before spaying a female pet.
Fact: This is false. Females who are spayed before their first heat are typically healthier.

Myth #4: My pet is a purebred and I should breed him/her.
Fact: Your pet may be a purebred, but so is at least one out of every four pets brought to animal shelters throughout the country. Purebreds and their offspring are no exception and be spayed and neutered as well.

Myth #5: My pet will get fat and lazy.
Fact: Pets get fat and lazy because their owners overfeed them and don’t provide enough exercise, not because they are spayed or neutered.

Myth #6: My dog (or cat) is so special. I want a puppy/kitten just like her/him.
Fact: Your pet’s puppies or kittens will not be a carbon copy of your pet.

Myth #7: It’s expensive to have my pet spayed
Fact: Many affordable options exist. Check out the ARL’s spay/neuter resources to find one in your area.