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ARL Rescue Conducts Tree Training

As the warm weather approaches, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Rescue Services expects to be busy, particularly when it comes getting cats out of trees. In order to ensure safety of both the staff and the animals they serve, training is essential.

For the past month, those new to technical climbing have spent hours getting familiar with knots, safety harnesses, throw lines and other climbing equipment.

This week the team had the opportunity to put the training to the test – under expert supervision, team members tackled their first tree on the grounds of ARL’s Dedham campus.

To see local news coverage of the training click here!

Weekly training will follow, as this type of climbing is precise and requires repetition, confidence and safety is paramount. Once this is achieved, agents will be ready to get into the field to assist these animals in need of help.

In 2018, ARL Rescue Services assisted more than 1,500 domestic animals and wildlife.

Help is on the way

If you see an animal in distress, contact ARL Rescue Services by calling 617-426-9170. Unfortunately ARL is unable to offer 24/7 services but will respond to an animal’s call for help as quickly as possible.


Nearly 50 Cats Removed from Metro Boston Home

While many of us were spending time with family during this past holiday weekend, our Law Enforcement Department was busy removing nearly 50 cats from a home, which has since been condemned due to deplorable and uninhabitable conditions.

When rescue agents entered the property, the air was suffocating and heavy with the odor of waste and decay. Trash, boxes and other items were piled from floor to ceiling and empty bowls and discarded cans of food littered the floors.

These conditions are a health hazard for animals and humans alike. Animals removed from these types of situations can have many issues including malnourishment, respiratory distress, matted fur and overgrown nails.

 

They're sick, frightened, and under-socialized – will you help?

They will need extraordinary medical treatment and likely weeks of constant interaction with staff and volunteers to recover – and thanks to your support, we will be able to provide them with everything they need.

In 2018, ARL removed more than 1,000 animals from overcrowding situations, and continues to see elevated numbers through the first four months of 2019.

Here are three things you can do today to help animals like the ones recovered this past weekend:

  1. Report Animal Cruelty. There are tell-tale signs of overcrowding and unhealthy living conditions for animals. If you identify any of the signs, please notify ARL Law Enforcement at cruelty@arlboston.org so we can investigate.
  2. Learn more about animal hoarding and animal overcrowding. This is a complex issue that often calls for deep compassion for animals and humans alike.
  3. Make a gift today. Donations support the investigation, rescue, and rehabilitation of animals that have suffered. With hoarding-type cases on the rise in the northeast, we need your support to help these animals overcome their trauma and find a safe, clean, happy home!

We cannot do this work alone – thank you for supporting animals when they need it most!

 

*PLEASE NOTE: These cats are not currently available for adoption and we ask that you please refrain from calling to inquire about them as these calls quickly overwhelm our phone lines. Thank you for your patience!


Local Companies Lend a Paw to Animals in Need

Recently, the employees of two local companies, Appleton Partners and Definitive Healthcare, hosted in-kind drives and fundraisers to benefit animals in need.

Both events helped raised funds to support ARL programs and secured treats, toys, and blankets for our shelter animals.

Thank you to the compassionate employees of both organizations who generously donated gifts, toys, and their time to our cause.

Interested in hosting a fundraising at your company? Please visit https://www.arlboston.org/diy-friendraiser/

Appleton Partners and Definitive Healthcare helping animals


Volunteer Appreciation Week 2019!

Volunteers drive ARL’s mission

It’s one of the greatest weeks of the year at the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), as the organization annually dedicates a week in April to heartily thank the hundreds of volunteers who truly make ARL an unwavering champion for animals.

Our Animal Care & Adoption Centers, Spay Waggin’, and administrative offices depend on volunteers to help with everything from feeding and training shelter animals, to providing care to community cats, to staffing special events, to general office support, and much more!

In 2018, nearly 550 volunteers dedicated an incredible total of 27,114 hours and the countless tasks that volunteers tackle on a daily basis has an immeasurable impact on the animals ARL cares for.

During celebrations in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham, ARL not only thanks every volunteer in attendance, but also hands out staff-nominated awards for those volunteers who shined the brightest during the past year.

The 2019 award winners are:

  • Best of Boston – Tori Reilly
  • Cape’d Crusader – Steve Chapman
  • Dedham’s Most Dignified – Janice Manwiller
  • ARL’s Unsung Hero – Kelley Mackinnon and Diane Toomey
  • All Other Creatures Big and Small – Denise Fritschy and Kevin Tenney
  • Admin’s Above and Beyond – Paula Dillon
  • Our Four Footed Friends Favorite Foster Parent – Sue Lowell

Volunteers at each ARL branch also had an opportunity to recognize an outstanding staff member:

  • Boston – Claire Humphries
  • Brewster – Becky Leuenberger
  • Dedham – Alicia Muller

Congratulations to our winners and THANK YOU to all of our volunteers who in the past year made such an incredible impact for animals in need!

Ready to Make a Difference for Animals in Need?

ARL is always looking for dedicated individuals willing to lend their hands, hearts, and time for animals in need. For more about the volunteer process and to see current opportunities, click here!


Press Release: Lactating Female Dog Found Roaming Busy Route 9

Dog not microchipped, whereabouts of litter unknown

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is asking for the public’s help in finding who was responsible for recently abandoning a 3-year-old pitbull-type dog along busy Route 9 between Worcester and Framingham.

Maizel is making progress, but was clearly neglected for some time in her previous situation.

The dog was found by a passerby and was brought to ARL’s Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center. She was lactating and had recently given birth, but information on where along Route 9 she was found was vague, and unfortunately, despite a thorough search, her puppies have not been located.

ARL Law Enforcement speculates the puppies were likely kept by whoever abandoned her.

Maizel was also emaciated and severely dehydrated, indicating she had been neglected for some time.

ARL Law Enforcement is working with authorities in Framingham to try and not only locate Maizel’s puppies, but to discover who left her along the heavily-traveled roadway.

Maizel has put on a few pounds while she’s been with ARL, is extremely friendly, and continues to make progress – she’ll be made available for adoption hopefully in the next week.

Abandoning an animal is a felony crime in Massachusetts, punishable by up to 7 years in prison and a $5,000 fine. Anyone with information is asked to contact ARL Law Enforcement at 617-426-9170, or Framingham Animal Control at 508-532-5870.


Taming Tiny Tigers

Volunteers to focus on under-socialized kittens

As spring slowly begins to show itself here in New England, it means the weather will be getting warmer and kitten season is upon us.

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) will soon be seeing an influx of kittens who will be rescued from a life on the streets and adopted into loving forever homes; but before that can happen, these kittens must first learn to trust humans.

This past week ARL’s kitten experts met with more than two dozen volunteers to discuss the process of “Taming Tiny Tigers” which are kittens between 8 weeks and 4-5-months-old.

Kittens without any previous human interaction are likely to be frightened; which often leads to hissing, scratching, biting, and defensive body posturing.

It’s the job of staff and these special volunteers to move these kittens past the fear, build trust, and allow their true personalities to shine through.

This cute snap shot doesn’t happen without proper socialization.

Hands-On Approach

Constant contact is key to properly socializing these tiny tigers, and volunteers will be responsible for 15-minute socialization sessions with following rest periods of 45 minutes, where the kitten is pet, scratched, enticed with food, and talked to calmly.

Each session will be meticulously documented, noting all body language and behavioral signs – both positive and negative.

As these sessions continue, the kitten will gradually lower its guard, allow more contact, and will eventually reciprocate with a purr, headbutt, kneading, or any of the cute and loving things that kittens do.

Each kitten’s personality is different, and some may become trusting in a short period of time, while others may take a while longer.

The end goal will be to find these kittens forever homes where they can continue to learn, socialize and be loving, amazing companion animals!

Volunteers make the difference

With approximately 550 volunteers, ARL relies on these special individuals to accomplish a number of daily tasks and could not offer the vast number of services ARL provides without their help.

In 2018, volunteers donated more than 27,000 hours of their time to help animals in need, and for more information and to submit an application to join our volunteer team, click here!


Popular Spring Flowers Toxic for Cats

With the weather changing, you may have noticed the first signs of spring in the form of flowers beginning to emerge from the ground.

Soon these flowers will be blooming, but along their beautiful sight and smell, many species of spring flowers add a life-threatening element of danger for your cat.

Lilies of all varieties (Easter Lilies, Daylilies, Asiatic Lilies, Peace Lilies, Lily of the Valley) top the list of spring flowers that are extremely dangerous for felines.

For cats like Duchess, ingesting just a small amount of toxic spring flowers like lilies can be life-threatening.

Ingesting just a leaf or two, or drinking a little water from a vase holding the flowers, can cause kidney failure, and possibly death.

Lilies are so toxic that symptoms can be seen less than 2 hours after ingestion and include:

  • Dehydration
  • Lack of Appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy

If you suspect your cat has ingested lilies or any harmful substance, seek medical attention immediately – do not wait!

Other spring plants that are toxic for your cat include: daffodils, tulips, chrysanthemums, and hyacinths.

Our animals rely on us to keep them safe — if you have a cat, it’s certainly a good idea to remove lilies and other noxious plants from your home and yard to ensure their safety.

Questions?

Contact Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) at 617-226-5605 or email at bvc@arlboston.org.


Stray Cat Rescued in Dorchester, Badly Injured but on the Mend

For 120 years, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) has been a lifeline for thousands of domestic animals annually, and a cat that was recently rescued on the streets of Dorchester is another example of this vital service.

A Good Samaritan alerted ARL Rescue Services this past week about a cat that was seen near a garbage dumpster and wasn’t moving. When ARL arrived on-scene, the cat was able to move, and was found inside the dumpster, lying atop a cardboard box.

He was evaluated on-scene, then brought to ARL’s Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center for medical treatment. The cat would likely have succumb to his injuries sooner rather than later and needed immediate treatment.

Gryffindor, who’s approximately 2-years-old, had suffered a broken jaw, was emaciated, and was in poor overall condition. While he was given a fictional namesake – the name itself represents courage, bravery and determination, which this suffering animal has in vast quantities.

His injuries were likely sustained in traumatic fashion i.e. struck by a car, and x-rays confirmed the cartilage piecing together the lower half of the jaw had separated, making it all but impossible to eat solid or even soft food.

The cat also had a puncture wound likely caused by another animal.

ARL’s medical staff surgically wired his lower jaw and the cat will be monitored to ensure no complications arise. Because of the puncture wound, the cat will also need to be quarantined for four months for a “wound of unknown origin” per state law.

Like many injured animals that come into the care of ARL, Gryffindor has displayed amazing perseverance and is incredibly friendly to all who come in contact with by revving up his gravely purr.

He is expected to make a full recovery and when his quarantine period is over, he will be available for adoption.

Extraordinary Care

From routine exams, dental work x-rays and diagnostic testing to complex surgeries, ARL’s Shelter Medicine staff provides high-quality care to every animal that comes through our doors.

Cost of such extraordinary care exceeds $600,000 annually, and ARL does not receive any government grants or public funding, relying solely on the generosity of individuals like you to continue this high level of care. Please consider donating today to help animals in need!


ARL Caring for Several Diabetic Cats

Cases of diabetes rapidly rising nationally – link to pet obesity

Diabetes is the second most common endocrine disease (hyperthyroidism is the most common) in cats, and the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) has seen several cats afflicted with the disease over the past year – recent statistics also indicate the number of cases are rapidly increasing.

The drastic increase can partly be attributed to the rise in pet obesity.

Webster, a 10-year-old male cat, was picked up as a stray in Malden, MA in late January, and had typical signs of living on the streets including dental disease and muscle wasting. However, his blood work revealed a glucose level of 349 – anything over 170 is considered high.

ARL’s shelter medicine staff continued diagnostic testing, instilled dietary changes and constantly monitored Webster hoping to rule out a diabetic diagnosis. However, a fructosamine test, which determines how the animal’s body is regulating blood glucose levels over a 2-3 week period, indicated that Webster’s body was not regulating properly and was properly diagnosed with diabetes.

The cat was placed into foster care, and is currently on a regimen of insulin injections twice a day, 12 hours apart, and after eating. Webster is also on a strict diet of wet and dry food specially formulated for managing diabetes.

Despite the diagnosis, Webster will have a good quality of life, his new owners will simply have to be diligent about follow-up veterinary care and ensuring insulin is administered as prescribed. Once his glucose can be regulated he will be ready to find his forever home!

Approximately half the cats diagnosed with diabetes can achieve remission if the disease is treated promptly – cats in remission may be able to stop insulin entirely as well.

Know the Signs

Diabetic symptoms vary and in addition to increased thirst and decreased activity, other signs include:

  • Weight loss
  • Change in litterbox habits
  • Appetite swings
  • Vomiting
  • Unsteady gait
  • Overall poor health

More than half the cats and dogs in the U.S. are overweight, and as long as pet obesity continues to be an issue, the number of diagnosed cases of diabetes in our pets will continue to rise. ARL encourages pet owners to strictly monitor their animal’s diets, limit treats and take action if a pet begins to gain or lose weight rapidly.


Senior Stray Finds Perfect Forever Home

“Frankie” required extensive medical care at ARL

In early January, 2019, Frankie, an 11-year-old Shih-Tzu, was found wandering the cold streets of Boston.

Given Frankie’s hearing and vision impairments, amazingly he wasn’t injured while living on the streets.

He was however, in dire need of medical attention.

Frankie’s initial veterinary exam revealed a handful of masses (both epidermal and oral), dental disease, and hearing loss. Additionally, x-rays were taken and blood was drawn for additional diagnostic testing.

The masses were removed and determined to be benign, however Frankie’s bloodwork revealed abnormalities which pointed to possible renal disease and pancreatitis.

The next month for Frankie would consist of more testing, frequent veterinary rechecks, and unfortunately additional findings.

While Frankie’s ongoing diagnostic testing showed improvement, there were further developments — the 11-year-old pup was diagnosed with glaucoma in one eye which needed to be removed; and a heart murmur was also discovered.

A Long Road Home

Despite all the testing and continuous discoveries, Frankie maintained a wonderful, friendly demeanor and was finally ready to find his forever home.

Frankie quickly found his perfect match, and will spend his golden years in a quiet home along the scenic North Shore.

Extraordinary Care

From routine exams to complex surgery, ARL’s shelter medicine staff provides extraordinary care for every animal that comes through ARL’s doors. Last year alone, more than $550,000 was spent to ensure these animals were healthy and happy. ARL does not receive any government grants or public funding, relying solely on the generosity of individuals like you to make our important work possible.

Please consider donating today to ensure these animals get the medical treatment they need!


 

two puppies; Cricket and Buzz