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Articles Tagged with: Animal Rescue
I Found A Baby Bird. What Do I Do Now?

The ARL provides tips on when and how to rescue a baby bird on the ground

Spring has sprung. The sun is shining. Flowers are blooming. And baby birds are learning to fly.

This time of year, The ARL receives phone calls from concerned citizens who come across baby birds on the ground. Although this sight may seem alarming, remember that part of the process of learning to fly comes with being on the ground. It’s typically best to keep a safe distance and not to intervene unless you’re sure the bird is orphaned or is in immediate danger.

To decide whether or not to step in the next time you spot a baby bird on the ground, follow this helpful flow chart:

What to do if you find a baby bird - flowchart

If the flow chart points you toward intervention, follow these 11 steps to ensure a safe rescue:

How to rescue a baby bird*†:

  1. Grab clean container with a lid and line the bottom with a soft cloth. Poke air holes if there are none.
  2. Wear gloves to protect yourself from the bird’s beak, talons, wings, and any potential parasites.
  3. Cover the bird with a light sheet or towel.
  4. Gently pick up the bird and place it in the prepared container.
  5. Warm the bird if it’s chilled by placing one end of the container on top of a heating pad (low setting) or in a shallow dish of warm water. You can also wrap the container with the warm cloth.
  6. Tape the container closed.
  7. Note exactly where you found the bird. This will be very important for release.
  8. Keep the bird in a warm dark quiet place away from children and animals. Do not give it food or water.
  9. Wash your hands and any clothing and objects that were in contact with the bird to avoid spreading any potential parasites.
  10. Contact a wildlife rehabilitator, state wildlife agency, or wildlife veterinarian.
  11. Get the bird to the wildlife expert as soon as possible. It is against the law in most states to keep wild animals in your home if you do not have a permit, even if you plan to release them.

To find a wildlife expert in your area, contact the New England Wildlife Center.

 

*Only adults should rescue baby birds. Before rescuing an adult bird, seek guidance from a wildlife expert.

†Source: Healers of the Wild: People Who Care For Injured and Orphaned Wildlife, By Shannon K. Jacobs


Spring Into Action Rescue Fund Drive, April 7-14

Spring into action today and support the ARL’s Rescue Services!

From high in trees to icy ocean waters, from burned out building to spillways with surging currents, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Rescue Services team has trained to save domestic animals and wildlife from all these situations and more.

The ARL is the only animal welfare organization in Massachusetts that has an entire department dedicated to rescuing animals from a variety of emergency situations. Domestic animals and wildlife can get trapped, displaced, injured, or otherwise distressed anywhere at any time of day, and our Rescue Services team stands ready to help as quickly as possible.

Animal Rescue League of Boston's rescue services team

See the ARL Rescue Services team in action in this profile story by Boston.com

No one wants to see animals suffering.

Gloucester ice rescue

Our rescue services team swam out to save this poor duck trapped on the ice, tangled in finishing line.

Whether it’s a duck trapped in fishing line, a mother cat and kittens stuck under a shed, or a deer trapped in mudflats, having trained and experienced rescue team to call is critical to protecting the safety and welfare of animals in our community. But providing emergency rescue services for thousands of animals every year is very expensive.

The ARL does not receive any government or public funding for rescue services and relies entirely on supporters like you to continue this important work!

An anonymous donor has challenged us to double a $5,000 donation and raise $10,000 in just 7 days for animal rescue. In other words, your donation today to the ARL’s Spring Into Action Rescue Fund Drive will go even further aiding animals in distress!

All donations made from April 7-14, 2015 will go directly to support our Rescue Services program.

Donate now

Visit arlboston.kintera.org/rescue or click the green button below to make a donation now.

Donate Now

SHARING IS CARING! Spread the word about our Spring Into Action Rescue Fund Drive and encourage your friends and family to support emergency rescue services for animals in distress!


See Something, Say Something – Report Animal Cruelty

April is Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Awareness Month

In support of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month this April, the ARL is kicking off its Spring “See Something, Say Something – Report Animal Cruelty” campaign.

Animal cruelty comes in many forms, including physical abuse, neglect of basic care, abandonment, dog fighting, and animal hoarding. Because many studies have demonstrated a strong link between cruelty to animals and other forms of domestic and community violence, prevention plays a critical role in improving the safety and welfare of both animals and people in Massachusetts.

Know your state’s animal cruelty laws

In 2014, the ARL’s Center for Animal Protection assisted in over 300 animal law enforcement cases. Unfortunately, this is a small number when you consider the startling statistic that 4 out of 5 animal cruelty cases go unreported.

We all have a role to play in prevention. Be aware and get to know the animals in your neighborhood. If you suspect animal cruelty, call your local authorities right away.  Help raise awareness and educate others about this issue.

Learn the 7 most common warning signs of animal cruelty and take action!

While most of us recognize that punching, kicking, burning, choking, or hitting an animal with an object are acts of animal Give a voice to animals.cruelty, there are also several more subtle warning signs of animal cruelty to watch for that could indicate mistreatment, neglect, or abuse:

  1. Howling or barking for a sustained period of time or hearing an animal cry in pain with higher pitched, more persistent vocal sounds than usual.
  2. Singed, matted, chronically or excessively dirty hair or fur.
  3. Wounds, unusual scars, hair loss, frequent limping often on different legs, or signs of improper nutrition such as weight loss or prominent visible ribs.
  4. Animals kept caged or tied with little room to move for long periods of time or without regular interaction with people
  5. Lack of protection from the weather or fece- or debris-strewn living areas for animals.
  6. Collars, leashes, or halters so tight they visibly dig into the animal’s face or neck.
  7. A large number of animals coming or going from a property.

If you know of or suspect animal cruelty, report concerns to your local authorities.  Learn more about how you can prevent animal cruelty at arlboston.org/take-action

Report suspicions of animal cruelty. If you see something, say something.


March is Adopt A Rescued Guinea Pig Month!

There’s more than just cats and dogs at ARL shelters

Many people assume that animal shelters only have cats and dogs, but here at the ARL we have a knowledgeable staff and are able to accommodate a variety of animals including guinea pigs.

And they are just waiting for to find their perfect match!

Meet BooBoo, an adorable 5-year-old female guinea pig available for adoption at our Boston shelter. She’s a friendly, but shy gal looking for a family to call her own.

Her two favorite activities?  Sitting on your lap to get a cheek scratch and snacking on tasty salads.

If you’d like to adopt a guinea pig like BooBoo from the ARL, make sure to bring a photo of the cage that your new pet will live in to make sure it’s a good size and shape for a guinea pig.

BooBoo

Adorable BooBoo strikes a pose during her photo shoot.

Just like any other pet, guinea pigs require special care and attention. Familiarizing yourself with their daily and long-term needs before adding one to your family is also an important step in the adoption process.

Learn more about guinea pigs

Guinea pigs can make great companions for both first-time or experienced pet owners, however they require a bit of patience and a gentle hand.

Once they are comfortable with you and their new surroundings, their personalities really shine through!

For more information on BooBoo or any of the other adoptable animals at our Boston shelter, you can speak with our shelter staff by calling (617) 226-5602.  Our shelters are open Tuesday through Sunday 1pm-6:30pm, excluding some holidays.

ADOPT A RESCUE GUINEA PIG MONTH FUN FACT Guinea pigs communicate through a variety of behaviors and sounds. These small animals will make a squealing or whistling sound, for example, to communicate anticipation or excitement–usually before they eat!  Meanwhile, a deep sounding purr indicates your guinea pig is comfortable and content.

 


Meet Madeline!

Sweet survivor cat ready for her new home

“Cases like hers are the reason that many of us got into the business of rescuing animals: there is nothing more rewarding than seeing an animal that was previously neglected transform with some TLC.”
– Dr. Kate Gollon, shelter veterinarian at the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Mad Before&AfterAlmost two months ago, a very kind person brought Madeline to our Dedham shelter after discovering the 8-year-old cat unable to move in the backyard of her home where someone had left her. Shelter staff instantly observed the fur on Madeline’s hind quarters appeared thickly matted and that she couldn’t move her back legs.

Her sweet temperament and soft, steady purr touched the hearts of shelter veterinarian Dr. Kate Gollon and all the Dedham staff as they worked to make her comfortable with pain medications and by shaving off the mass of tangles on her lower body.

Dr. Gollon determined Madeline had nearly 4 inches of mats over 70% of her body.  The bag of her shaved matted fur tipped the scales at over a pound.  The twisted condition of her coat  had clearly forced her to go to the bathroom on herself and likely prevented her from walking for some time. Even after shelter staff shaved her fur, she couldn’t walk on her very weak back legs.

When diagnostic tests including x-rays and bloodwork did not provide a more definitive reason for the weakness in her back legs, Dr. Gollon prescribed a regimen of daily physical therapy to help Madeline recover her strength and mobility. Staff gave Madeline time post-shave to recuperate and get to know them before carefully and caringly beginning to work with her to get her walking.

At first, staff gently moved her back legs for her, three times a day. Gradually, they helped her stand by placing her in a sling to support her weight while getting her up on all fours. Once her ability to support herself improved, staff worked with her on walking across the floor and maneuvering changes in elevation.  To give her some added traction on the polished cement floors at the shelter, staff would place a touch of Vaseline on her paw pads.

Everyone at the Dedham shelter felt as proud as mamma cats watching Madeline’s amazing progress as she confidently strolled to them and maneuvered up carpeted steps for the first time!

A dedicated ARL foster volunteer brought Madeline to her home to help her re-acclimate to living with people. Though the determined kitty remains a bit unsteady on her hind legs, she shows no signs they are holding her back. According to her foster mom, Madeline loves to explore and happily curls up on the couch for a good snooze afterwards.

We’re very happy to report Madeline is ready for adoption!  Scotties Facial Tissue will cover her adoption fee this weekend, so come visit the ARL’s Dedham shelter and read her adoption profile to learn more about her.

Because of her unsteady legs, she would do best in a home with carpet.  A one-story house or apartment, or a home where she would spend most of her time in one big room or have access to her litter box and food without having to climb stairs would make for the ideal situation for Madeline.

In the words of Dr. Gollon: “Madeline is a special cat and quite a survivor!  The family who adopts her will most definitely fall in love with her as much as we have at ARL.”


UPDATE: Animals Rescued from Unlicensed Traveling Petting Zoo

Animals Rescued on 2/7 in Ludlow Getting Ready to Go Home

Monica

Monica, available for adoption!

We have an exciting update on the animals taken in by the Animal Rescue League of Boston on February 7 from an unlicensed traveling petting zoo in Ludlow, Massachusetts!

Read the details of the Ludlow rescue.

In their prior circumstances, the animals did not have adequate shelter and their previous owner has been charged with 36 alleged counts of animal cruelty.  The ARL’s rescue services team assisted the MSPCA in providing emergency transport and care for 12 of the 35 animals involved in this case.

Since arriving at the barn at our Dedham shelter, the Ludlow 12 – including standard donkeys, miniature donkeys, goats, sheep, and Shetland ponies – received medical attention, proper nutrition, and a visit from the farrier, a specialist in equine hoof care.

All have made terrific progress in their recovery.  Those with overgrown hooves learned to walk properly again and all began going out into the livestock paddock on sunny days.

Thanks to special TLC from shelter staff, the personalities of these gentle creatures started to shine through as they relaxed in their new environment.  With their friendly and cuddly ways, the standard donkeys, FORREST (pictured below) and JENNY, in particular have endeared themselves to all their visitors!

Late last month, their previous owner officially surrendered them to the Animal Rescue League of Boston and potential adopters began asking about them almost immediately.

Ross, available for adoption!

Ross, available for adoption!

You can view the Ludlow animals currently available for adoption on our website.

If you would like to contribute to the costs of medical care and food for these animals and others like them, please click the button below to make a contribution today!

DONATE NOW

03-3-14 Forrest

Forrest loves posing for the camera!


See What ARL Rescue Does in 90 Mins or Less

NECN’s Ally Donnelly Reports: When Temps Drop ARL Suits Up

The New England Cable News Network (NECN) hopped on our Rescue Truck yesterday for an exciting afternoon of cold weather rescues.

In just under 90 minutes, a turkey with a broken wing from Malden, a swan frozen to the ice from Stoughton, and an abandoned cat found shivering on a farm in Dover were brought into the ARL.

With the recent abundance of cold weather snaps our Rescue Team has been extremely busy and we’re grateful to NECN for coming along for the ride and sharing the work of the ARL.

Watch Ally Donnelly’s report by clicking the video below!

 

01-29-14 NECN ARL Rescue Video Screenshot


Philbert Update: Cat Lost Leg Due to Illegal Trap

Many of you have been asking for an update about Philbert. On June 28th we shared this brave cat’s story with you. He had been found caught in an illegal trap in Athol, MA. Thanks to our Rescue Team’s efforts and those of Athol Animal Control and the Foster Hospital for Small Animals at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, Philbert’s life was spared, however,  his leg did have to be amputated. We’d like to thank everyone who donated to help us with his care.

07-27 Philbert_ThumbPhilbert is recovering well – he’s affectionate, but prefers quiet interaction. We’re trying to create a home-like setting for him and are not keeping him in a cage. Philbert has hours of human companionship every day and is receiving excellent care.

We still have no leads on who set or owns the trap, so if you have any clues that could help us in our case please contact our Law Enforcement Department.

Reminder: Anyone who finds an empty trap is warned to not touch it, and asked to call your local police, animal control officer, or the Massachusetts Environmental Police at 800.632.8075 to report the trap. If you find a trap with an animal in it, contact the League’s Rescue Team at 617.426.9170.

Read Philbert’s story.


Boston Herald Shares a Look Inside Dedham Shelter

This past Saturday the Boston Herald published a story and video about our Dedham shelter, emphasizing that the League takes in all sorts of animals, including livestock, and nurses neglected animals back to health. The video also highlights our law enforcement department, which works tirelessly to help animals who are suffering from cruelty and neglect. Watch the video to learn more about the work of our Dedham shelter. If you haven’t visited yet, be sure to stop by!

BostonHeraldDedhamShelterCat

If you didn’t see the Herald’s Pet of the Week profile about Highway, a handsome German Shepherd mix, be sure to check that out too.

Thank you to our friends at the Herald for helping raise awareness about what we do. We appreciate your support!


Oliver Twist, Adopted!

We’re starting this Saturday off with some wonderful news! Oliver Twist has found the perfect home! When he first came to the League he was in very rough shape. His journey has been tough and we have no way of knowing everything that that he’s been through, but we do know that this playful puppy has gone to a fabulous home! Finally, he’ll have a chance to experience what being a puppy is all about with a family that loves him!

Oliver

Staff members give Oliver one last hug before he goes home with his new family!