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Articles Tagged with: Animal Rescue
I Found A Baby Bird. What Do I Do Now?

ARL provides tips on when and how to rescue a baby bird on the ground

Spring has sprung. The sun is shining. Flowers are blooming. And baby birds are learning to fly.

This time of year, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) receives phone calls from concerned citizens who come across baby birds on the ground. Although this sight may seem alarming, remember that part of the process of learning to fly comes with being on the ground. It’s typically best to keep a safe distance and not to intervene unless you’re sure the bird is orphaned or is in immediate danger.

To decide whether or not to step in the next time you spot a baby bird on the ground, follow this helpful flow chart:

What to do if you find a baby bird - flowchart


If the flow chart points you toward intervention, follow these 11 steps to ensure a safe rescue*†:

      1. Grab clean container with a lid and line the bottom with a soft cloth. Poke air holes if there are none.
      2. Wear gloves to protect yourself from the bird’s beak, talons, wings, and any potential parasites.
      3. Cover the bird with a light sheet or towel.
      4. Gently pick up the bird and place it in the prepared container.
      5. Warm the bird if it’s chilled by placing one end of the container on top of a heating pad (low setting) or in a shallow dish of warm water. You can also wrap the container with the warm cloth.
      6. Tape the container closed.
      7. Note exactly where you found the bird. This will be very important for release.
      8. Keep the bird in a warm dark quiet place away from children and animals. Do not give it food or water.
      9. Wash your hands and any clothing and objects that were in contact with the bird to avoid spreading any potential parasites.
      10. Contact a wildlife rehabilitator, state wildlife agency, or wildlife veterinarian.
      11. Get the bird to the wildlife expert as soon as possible. It is against the law in most states to keep wild animals in your home if you do not have a permit, even if you plan to release them.

Find a list of wildlife rehabilitators here.

*Only adults should rescue baby birds. Before rescuing an adult bird, seek guidance from a wildlife expert.
†Source: Healers of the Wild: People Who Care For Injured and Orphaned Wildlife, By Shannon K. Jacobs


April is Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Awareness Month

Animal cruelty comes in many forms, including physical abuse, neglect of basic care, abandonment, dog fighting, and animal hoarding. Because many studies have demonstrated a strong link between cruelty to animals and other forms of domestic and community violence, prevention plays a critical role in improving the safety and welfare of both animals and people in Massachusetts.

Know your state’s animal cruelty laws

In 2014, the ARL’s Center for Animal Protection assisted in over 300 animal law enforcement cases. Unfortunately, this is a small number when you consider the startling statistic that 4 out of 5 animal cruelty cases go unreported.

We all have a role to play in prevention. Be aware and get to know the animals in your neighborhood. If you suspect animal cruelty, call your local authorities right away.  Help raise awareness and educate others about this issue.

Learn the 7 most common warning signs of animal cruelty and take action!

While most of us recognize that punching, kicking, burning, choking, or hitting an animal with an object are acts of animal cruelty, there are also several more subtle warning signs of animal cruelty to watch for that could indicate mistreatment, neglect, or abuse:

  1. Howling or barking for a sustained period of time or hearing an animal cry in pain with higher pitched, more persistent vocal sounds than usual.
  2. Singed, matted, chronically or excessively dirty hair or fur.
  3. Wounds, unusual scars, hair loss, frequent limping often on different legs, or signs of improper nutrition such as weight loss or prominent visible ribs.
  4. Animals kept caged or tied with little room to move for long periods of time or without regular interaction with people
  5. Lack of protection from the weather or fece- or debris-strewn living areas for animals.
  6. Collars, leashes, or halters so tight they visibly dig into the animal’s face or neck.
  7. A large number of animals coming or going from a property.

If you know of or suspect animal cruelty, report concerns to your local authorities. Click here to learn more about how you can prevent animal cruelty. 


March is Adopt A Rescued Guinea Pig Month!

There’s more than just cats and dogs at ARL

Many people assume that animal care & adoption centers only have cats and dogs, but here at the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) we have a knowledgeable staff and are able to accommodate a variety of animals including guinea pigs.

guinea pig

And they are just waiting for to find their perfect match!

If you’d like to adopt a guinea pig (or other small animal) from the ARL, make sure to bring a photo of the cage that your new pet will live in to make sure it’s a good size and shape for a guinea pig.

Just like any other pet, guinea pigs require special care and attention. Familiarizing yourself with their daily and long-term needs before adding one to your family is also an important step in the adoption process.

Learn more about guinea pigs

Guinea pigs can make great companions for both first-time or experienced pet owners, however they require a bit of patience and a gentle hand.

Once they are comfortable with you and their new surroundings, their personalities really shine through!

ADOPT A RESCUE GUINEA PIG MONTH FUN FACT Guinea pigs communicate through a variety of behaviors and sounds. These small animals will make a squealing or whistling sound, for example, to communicate anticipation or excitement–usually before they eat!  Meanwhile, a deep sounding purr indicates your guinea pig is comfortable and content.

 


Meet Madeline!

Sweet survivor cat ready for her new home

**Update: Madeline has been adopted**

“Cases like hers are the reason that many of us got into the business of rescuing animals: there is nothing more rewarding than seeing an animal that was previously neglected transform with some TLC.”
– Dr. Kate Gollon, shelter veterinarian at the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Mad Before&AfterAlmost two months ago, a very kind person brought Madeline to our Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center after discovering the 8-year-old cat unable to move in the backyard of her home where someone had left her. Shelter staff instantly observed the fur on Madeline’s hind quarters appeared thickly matted and that she couldn’t move her back legs.

Her sweet temperament and soft, steady purr touched the hearts of shelter veterinarian Dr. Kate Gollon and all the Dedham staff as they worked to make her comfortable with pain medications and by shaving off the mass of tangles on her lower body.

Dr. Gollon determined Madeline had nearly 4 inches of mats over 70% of her body.  The bag of her shaved matted fur tipped the scales at over a pound.  The twisted condition of her coat  had clearly forced her to go to the bathroom on herself and likely prevented her from walking for some time. Even after shelter staff shaved her fur, she couldn’t walk on her very weak back legs.

When diagnostic tests including x-rays and bloodwork did not provide a more definitive reason for the weakness in her back legs, Dr. Gollon prescribed a regimen of daily physical therapy to help Madeline recover her strength and mobility. Staff gave Madeline time post-shave to recuperate and get to know them before carefully and caringly beginning to work with her to get her walking.

At first, staff gently moved her back legs for her, three times a day. Gradually, they helped her stand by placing her in a sling to support her weight while getting her up on all fours. Once her ability to support herself improved, staff worked with her on walking across the floor and maneuvering changes in elevation.  To give her some added traction on the polished cement floors at the shelter, staff would place a touch of Vaseline on her paw pads.

Everyone at the Dedham shelter felt as proud as mamma cats watching Madeline’s amazing progress as she confidently strolled to them and maneuvered up carpeted steps for the first time!

A dedicated ARL foster volunteer brought Madeline to her home to help her re-acclimate to living with people. Though the determined kitty remains a bit unsteady on her hind legs, she shows no signs they are holding her back. According to her foster mom, Madeline loves to explore and happily curls up on the couch for a good snooze afterwards.

We’re very happy to report Madeline is ready for adoption! Scotties Facial Tissue will cover her adoption fee this weekend, so come visit the ARL’s Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center to learn more about her.

Because of her unsteady legs, she would do best in a home with carpet.  A one-story house or apartment, or a home where she would spend most of her time in one big room or have access to her litter box and food without having to climb stairs would make for the ideal situation for Madeline.

In the words of Dr. Gollon: “Madeline is a special cat and quite a survivor!  The family who adopts her will most definitely fall in love with her as much as we have at ARL.”


UPDATE: Animals Rescued from Unlicensed Traveling Petting Zoo

Animals Rescued on 2/7 in Ludlow Getting Ready to Go Home

Monica

Monica, available for adoption!

We have an exciting update on the animals taken in by the Animal Rescue League of Boston on February 7 from an unlicensed traveling petting zoo in Ludlow, Massachusetts!

Read the details of the Ludlow rescue.

In their prior circumstances, the animals did not have adequate shelter and their previous owner has been charged with 36 alleged counts of animal cruelty.  The ARL’s rescue services team assisted the MSPCA in providing emergency transport and care for 12 of the 35 animals involved in this case.

Since arriving at the barn at our Dedham shelter, the Ludlow 12 – including standard donkeys, miniature donkeys, goats, sheep, and Shetland ponies – received medical attention, proper nutrition, and a visit from the farrier, a specialist in equine hoof care.

All have made terrific progress in their recovery.  Those with overgrown hooves learned to walk properly again and all began going out into the livestock paddock on sunny days.

Thanks to special TLC from shelter staff, the personalities of these gentle creatures started to shine through as they relaxed in their new environment.  With their friendly and cuddly ways, the standard donkeys, FORREST (pictured below) and JENNY, in particular have endeared themselves to all their visitors!

Late last month, their previous owner officially surrendered them to the Animal Rescue League of Boston and potential adopters began asking about them almost immediately.

Ross, available for adoption!

Ross, available for adoption!

You can view the Ludlow animals currently available for adoption on our website.

If you would like to contribute to the costs of medical care and food for these animals and others like them, please click the button below to make a contribution today!

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03-3-14 Forrest

Forrest loves posing for the camera!