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Articles Tagged with: Animals
Thank You Thursday: Community Support Leads to Dog Play Yard Renovation

K-9 Grass Coming Soon to ARL Dog Play-Yard

We’re delighted to share that the Animal Rescue League’s application for permission to install K-9 grass in the Boston play yard was unanimously approved by the South End Landmarks Commission last week.

The proposed K-9 grass represents a huge improvement over the current stone/grass/dirt surface, which will be very good for dogs and for the appearance of the space.

Our application sailed through on both its merits and with the overwhelming support expressed by our South End neighbors and Mayor Walsh’s office. We were able to submit a total of 432 signatures expressing community support for our project!

There are many people to thank for organizing our presentation and collecting signatures.

Our volunteers as always stepped up in a big way. Thank you to Astrid and Peter Rapoza, Mal Malme, Maria Uribe, Michelle S, Marna Terry and Kerry and Gus Pena.

Along with our volunteers, several local businesses collected signatures including Berkeley Perk,  Rome’s Pizza, Emelio’s Pizza, Billy’s Lunch Café and the Berkeley Barber Shop.

We’d also like to thank ARL staff, especially Bob Williams our Director of Facilities who was the champion of this project. Bob left no stone unturned from the research for finding the right surface material, to the presentation and overall coordination.

“I am very grateful for the above and beyond effort here; it will mean so much to ARL and dogs in our care,” said ARL president, Mary Nee.

Construction will start this summer! Stay tuned for details.

Dog Play Yard After


Pets of the Week: Kingsley & Rigel Become BFFs at ARL Dedham Shelter [VIDEO]

Kingsley & Rigel’s Adoption Fees are Sponsored in Full 

Kingsley (two-years-old) and Rigel (five-years-old) were found as strays and became best friends at the ARL’s Dedham shelter. They are also both FIV positive. These two wonderful cats have grown inseparable and need to find a loving home that will take them both.

Watch their video above to learn more about these pawsome fellas and to see the beautiful bond that they’ve created.

Kingsley and Rigel’s adoption fees have been sponsored in full by very generous donors who have fallen in love with these sweet boys!

Read their profile

If Kingsley and Rigel sound like the cats for you, come meet them at our Dedham shelter. Or if you know someone who’d make the purrfect match,  share their information via social media.

Kingsley & Rigel Photo


Thank You Thursday: Feral Cat Clinic Volunteers Make it Happen

Last Feral Clinic of the Spring Yields 5 “Friendly” Cats

Feral Clinic PhotoThank you so much to all of our volunteers and staff who participated Sunday’s “Fix a Feral” cat clinic. These clinics rely on volunteers and we were happy to see so many new faces! We admitted 65 cats to the clinic, five of which were found to be “friendly” and were admitted to our Boston shelter.

One of the cats who we admitted has a microchip. After tracing her chip we found that she was adopted from one of our shelters several years ago. Unfortunately, all the phone numbers that we have are no longer in service, but our Boston shelter manager sent a certified letter to the last known address and we’ll see if an owner is found!

This serves as an important reminder to 1) microchip your cats and 2) keep your contact information up-to-date. If a cat that has gone missing is brought in to one of our clinics and has a microchip with current contact information. We’ll be able to reunite the cat with his/her owner. Remember, even indoor cats escape sometimes!

We’d also like to thank Bertucci’s for generously donating lunch for our volunteers to help get them through the long day!

feral cat clinic catOur next Fix-a-Feral cat clinics will take place in the fall.

If you’re interested in becoming a trapper and helping TNR (trap/neuter/release) a feral cat community near you, please email feralcatinfo@arlboston.org today. We’re always in need of more feral cat trappers.

Learn more about feral cats: arlboston.org/fix-a-feral


Include Your Furry Friends in Your Emergency Plan

Honor National Animal Disaster Preparedness Day

backpack

As parts of the U.S. battle floods, tornadoes, and wild fires, the ARL encourages Massachusetts pet owners to plan ahead for a sudden evacuation.

“If you have a pet, part of your emergency planning should include how you will shelter and care for your animal,” explains Brian O’Connor, manager of rescue services at the ARL.  “Getting a pet emergency bag ready to go in case you need to evacuate due to flooding or loss of electricity during a storm or other disaster is a very important part of disaster preparedness.”

In addition to an emergency bag, the Federal Emergency Management Agency recommends:

  • Getting a sturdy and comfy crate or carrier to transport your pet
  • Finding a shelter alternative that works for both you and your pet
  • Having a picture of you and your pet together in case you get separated during an emergency

“Having a recent picture of you and your pet not only helps others assist you in finding your pet, but it also documents ownership,” says O’Connor.

Download our pet emergency packing list flyer: http://bit.ly/arlpreparedpets

 


ARLBoston Rescue Saves Juvenile Bald Eagle in Tyngsborough, MA

Eagle is Resting at Tufts

ARLhawkOn May first the Animal Rescue League of Boston received a call from Tyngsborough animal control in regards to an injured juvenile bald eagle.

With the assistance of the animal control officer our rescue team was able to quickly set up their bow net which was recently donated by the Harmony Foundation, bait it with food and humanely catch the  injured bird in minutes.

The eagle was taken to The Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts wildlife in Grafton for further care.

Watch the video of the remarkable rescue below:

 

These types of rescues are only possible through the generous support of people like you. If you can, please make a donation today by clicking the green donate button on the top right of this page.


Closing Thoughts on Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month From Mary Nee

Today, the last day of April, concludes Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month.

Mary & Mickey square

ARL president, Mary Nee

Bringing greater attention to the issue is, of course, central to what the ARL does all year long, yet if you asked me why should we bring greater attention to the issue of animal cruelty, I’d say the reasons go well beyond the mission of our organization.

Reason #1: Animal cruelty is a big problem.

In 2013, the ARL assisted in the investigation of 567 cases of animal cruelty—that’s more than one case a day and we’re just one of many organizations and law enforcement agencies in the state legally pursuing animal welfare issues.

When you consider that at least 80% of animal cruelty remains undiscovered, the magnitude of the problem truly sinks in.

Reason #2: Animal cruelty can indicate other illegal activity, domestic abuse, and mental illness.

Animal cruelty can take many forms.  The intentions behind deliberately inflicting injuries or failing to provide minimum care and nutrition can vary.

Sometimes an animal is physically abused or denied basic care for sport or other financial gain, as in the case of staged dog fighting.  Other times, an animal is intentionally harmed to physically or emotionally intimidate a partner or family member.  In still others, a hoarding compulsion quickly overwhelms an owner’s ability to provide basic care and nutrition to the animals living in the home or on the property.

In each situation, however, the safety and well-being of animals, people, and our communities are all potentially at risk.

Startling statistics remind us of the strong connection between animal cruelty and other forms of violence and criminal behavior.  In a Massachusetts study, for example, 70% of animal abusers had criminal records including crimes involving violence, property, drugs, or disorderly behavior (Arluke & Luke, 1997).

Reason #3: What we do to address animal cruelty reflects our tolerance for other forms of family and community violence.

Heightened awareness of how animals are cared for and treated not only helps reduce the number of tragic cases of animal suffering, but also moves us closer to a more just and humane society where both people and animals are valued.

Whether it’s violence against an animal, child, or an adult, we should all do something to stop it from happening.

Reporting suspicions of animal cruelty to local authorities plays a critical role in prevention.  As we have talked about all this month, if when you see something, please say something and call your local police. 

You will make a tremendous difference in the lives of people and animals.

– Mary Nee, President of the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Test your knowledge of animal cruelty issues by taking the ARL’s Animal Cruelty Quiz and learn more about what you can do to prevent animal cruelty at arlboston.org/take-action


How Much Do You Know About Animal Cruelty Stats?

Take Our Animal Cruelty Quiz

Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month is coming to an end. See how much you’ve learned this month. Take the ARL’s online quiz, which will test your knowledge of animal cruelty laws and links between animal cruelty and domestic violence.

At the end you’ll see how you rank against other animal welfare supporters. Help educate your friends about animal cruelty by sharing the quiz with them!

dog_quiz_picTake the quiz!

In case you need to brush-up before the quiz, check-out these helpful resources below.

7 Warning Signs of Potential Animal Cruelty

The Link Between Animal Cruelty and Violence Against People

Other Helpful resources at arlboston.org/take-action


Animal Cruelty and Human Violence: Q&A with Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore

Today marks the end of Animal Cruelty and Human Violence Awareness week, a time to discuss the growing body of evidence demonstrating the strong connection between animal abuse and other forms of family and community violence.

Law enforcement agencies, including the International Association of Chiefs of Police have expressed concern about the relationship between animal cruelty, domestic violence, child and elder abuse, usually referred to as “The Link”.  Studies have confirmed a relationship between animal abuse and other violent crimes.

Download our fact sheet on animal cruelty and human violence.

Dr. Smith X-Ray

Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore

We asked Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, vice president of animal welfare at the ARL, for her perspective on the link between animal cruelty and human violence.  Here’s what she had to say:

ARL Blog: How would you define “animal abuse?”

Dr. Smith-Blackmore: Animal abuse can include physical abuse (non-accidental injury), emotional abuse, neglect, sexual abuse and staged animal fights.

Physical abuse is characterized by the deliberate inflicting of injuries or causing pain, including inappropriate methods of training. Emotional abuse may include repeated or sustained ‘mental violence’(intimidation through loud yelling or threatening behaviors) or deliberate isolation through the  withholding social interactions.

Neglect is the failure to provide adequate levels of food, water, shelter, and veterinary care to animals. Sexual abuse includes any sexual conduct with animals, which may or may not result in physical injury to the animal.

Unfortunately, examples of all of these kinds of animal abuse have been investigated by the ARL’s Law Enforcement department.  Last year alone, our Law Enforcement team led or assisted in the investigation of 576 cruelty cases.

ARL Blog:  Most people would agree that reporting animal cruelty helps the animals involved and for that reason is importance to do.  But is there an even bigger impact reporting animal cruelty has on a community?

Dr. Smith-Blackmore: Absolutely.  Animal abuse is an important social issue affecting animals, families, and communities.

Recognizing and reporting animal abuse is especially important, due to the link between animal abuse and human violence. A correlation between animal abuse, family violence and other forms of community violence has been established.

Family and animal protection professionals have recognized this connection, noting that abuse of children, elders, domestic partners and animals result in a self-perpetuating cycle of violence.

ARL Blog:  So reporting concerns about animal cruelty can really make a difference to both animals and people?

Dr. Smith-Blackmore: Yes, when animals in a home are abused or neglected, it’s a warning sign that others in the household may not be safe. In addition, children who witness animal abuse are harmed and are also at a greater risk of becoming abusers themselves.

Laws provide animals with protection from abuse; however successful prosecution depends on reporting by witnesses to law enforcement authorities.  Protecting animals and creating safe and humane communities has to be a priority for us all.

Learn more about animal cruelty and domestic violence.

For more on this topic visit arlboston.org/take-action


Bunnies are Not Just for Easter. They’re for Life!

Bunnies and Easter go hand-in-hand, but when deciding on giving a rabbit as an Easter gift, consider the chocolate, candy and stuffed animal toy kind first, and if you’re really serious, then think about adopting a rabbit. Adding a real, live rabbit to your family should be a well thought-out decision.

Here’s what you should know about rabbits:

  • They should live indoors.
  • They have a lifespan of about 10 years.
  • Rabbits are sensitive and can be stressed out by small children.
  • They like to chew on cords and furniture, so your home must be bunny-proofed.
  • Rabbits should be neutered or spayed or they will mark your house.
  • They make great apartment pets.

If you are thinking about adopting a rabbit this Easter remember to ask yourself the question, ‘Was I interested in a rabbit before Spring or am I getting caught up by the holiday fever?’ It can be an exciting surprise to add one to your family at Easter time as long as you have considered the commitment and the care that will last long after you’ve devoured your last Cadbury Crème Egg!


Limited Release “See Something, Say Something” Doggy T-Shirts Now Available

You & Your Dog Can Make a Difference!

Dog T-shirt 1April is Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month and yesterday marked the beginning of Animal Cruelty and Human Violence Awareness Week.

Your dog can raise awareness about animal cruelty by wearing one of the ARL’s doggy t-shirts!

Starting this weekend when you make a $25 donation at any of the ARL’s shelters in Boston, Brewster, or Dedham you’ll receive a limited release “See Something, Say Something” doggie t-shirt.

We have many sizes available!

Learn more at arlboston.org/take-action