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Category: Brewster
Press Release: Deceased Dog in Plastic Bag Found Near Lawrence School

Necropsy reveals extensive abuse leading to death

In late March, a young female Jack Russell Terrier-type dog was found deceased near a Lawrence, MA, school.

A necropsy has revealed the dog’s death was the result of extensive abuse, and the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Law Enforcement Department, working in conjunction with the Lawrence Police Department, are urgently seeking information to determine who may have been responsible.

A Lawrence police officer discovered the approximately 1-year-old dog along a frequented walking trail behind South Lawrence East Middle School on March 17, at approximately 10:45 a.m.

The white and tan dog had been partially wrapped in a “pee pad” and placed in a black plastic bag. There was blood present inside the bag and on the dog’s body, as well as urine staining on the dog’s tail.

It is likely the dog had not been left in the area for very long.

It appears the animal suffered extreme cruelty and abuse, which led to the dog’s death.

A necropsy has determined the animal’s cause of death to be acute blood loss and multiple skull fractures. Extensive bruising on the body indicates the dog was also intermittently abused in the 36-hours leading up to its death.

Anyone with information pertaining to this ongoing investigation is urged to contact Lawrence Police Det. Carmen Poupora at (978) 794-5900 x625, or ARL Law Enforcement at (617) 426-9170 ext. 110 or cruelty@arlboston.org.


Non-Native Lizard Hitchhikes from Florida to Massachusetts

Finders brought lizard to ARL Brewster Facility

Recently, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Brewster Animal Care and Adoption Center took in a curious, non-native lizard that decided to hit the road and had hitchhiked its way from Florida to Massachusetts.

To see local media coverage of this story click here!

This curious lizard took a little road trip and wound up at ARL!

The person who brought the lizard to ARL stated that the reptile had somehow gotten into the interior of the vehicle when leaving Florida and was discovered upon arrival in Massachusetts.

The lizard, described as a Brown Anole, is native to Florida and abundant in the Sunshine State, but a non-native species to Massachusetts — the lizard was transported to a reptile rescue organization in Connecticut to receive care and be rehomed.

ARL commends the actions of the lizard’s finder and reminds the pubic that non-native species should never be released into the wild, as they can create vast ecological problems.

Any non-native species should be taken to a rescue organization like ARL where they will receive the care they need.


April is National Heartworm Awareness Month

Did you know… it only takes one bite from an infected mosquito to spread Heartworm disease to your pet?

Heartworm disease

Heartworms.
Source: www.heartwormsociety.org

Heartworm disease is a serious and potentially fatal illness for cats, dogs, and ferrets, as well as other mammals. It is caused by foot-long worms (heartworms) that live in the heart, lungs, and blood vessels of affected animals. Heartworm may result in lung disease, heart failure, or other organ damage.

Although this sounds scary (it is!), Heartworm disease can be avoided altogether with the necessary preventative measures.

Protect your pet by reading these 6 FAQs about Heartworm:

  1. How can Heartworm disease spread to my pet? Heartworm disease is spread by mosquitoes carrying the parasite Dirofilaria Immitis. When an infected mosquito bites a cat, dog, ferret, or other mammal, larvae are transmitted into the bloodstream and ultimately settle in the heart, arteries, blood vessels, and lungs after a period of months.
  2. Which pets are at risk? Any pet in an area with mosquitos is at risk for Heartworm disease.
  3. What symptoms should I look for? Signs of Heartworm disease can be very subtle or very severe depending on the case. Symptoms may include persistent cough, difficulty breathing, fatigue, decreased appetite, vomiting, and weight loss. As the disease progresses, an animal may experience fainting, seizures, difficulty walking, or fluid accumulation in the abdomen. Kittens, puppies, and senior pets face the highest risk of developing the more severe symptoms.
  4. How is Heartworm disease diagnosed? It takes approximately 6 months after being bitten by an infected mosquito for your pet to test positive for Heartworm. A veterinarian can make a diagnosis by doing a physical examination and running blood tests.
  5. Is Heartworm disease treatable? For dogs in the US, there is treatment available. Unfortunately for cats in the US, there is currently no approved treatment. The good news, however, is that many Heartworm-infected cats are able to fight the infection themselves and can be monitored every few months, while waiting out the worms’ lifespan. Medications can also be given to help alleviate some symptoms, such as coughing and vomiting.
  6. How can I prevent my pet from contracting Heartworm disease? There are several FDA-approved medications* on the market available for both cats and dogs. Your pet should begin a heartworm preventative around 8 weeks of age, which should be taken year-round. Dogs should be tested for Heartworm every 12 months and regular check-ups for all pets are key to early detection.

 

*Always consult with your veterinarian before administering any type of medication to your pet.

A Friendship Forged Under Quarantine

For Ollie and Holly, they came from different areas, different situations, but fate (and a four-month quarantine) brought these two kitty friends together, and now the pair are set to spend the rest of their lives in the same home.

Five-year-old Ollie came to the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) in November 2020 after he was stuck in a tree in Weymouth for five days.

When ARL’s Field Services Department went to rescue him, neighbors indicated he had been in the area for several months and that the neighborhood kids nicknamed him Oliver (Ollie) – the name stuck.

Ollie was transported to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center, and because his veterinary exam revealed several puncture wounds of unknown origin, the former stray would need to undergo a state-mandated four-month-quarantine.

For Holly, she also came to ARL in November 2020 after being found as a stray in the North Dartmouth area. Along with being a little underweight, she had suffered wounds to her legs, and like Ollie, was required to spend the next four months in quarantine.

When Ollie Met Holly

Upon arrival at ARL, Holly was friendly but nervous, especially around new people – she did however enjoy being around other cats.

Ollie on the other hand was incredibly friendly upon arrival, saying hello to anyone who would pay him attention. When it came to other cats however, Ollie was not interested – until he met Holly.

The two were placed in an office so they could have more space to stretch out and interact with people during their quarantine period, and for Ollie, he quickly became interested in Holly.

The pair would play and were often seen napping together, and even eating together! With Ollie’s help, Holly slowly began to come out of her shell and be more social with people.

Going Home

Given the bond forged during their four-months in quarantine, it was decided that the former community cats should find their new home together.

It didn’t take long, just days after being made available for adoption they found their perfect match and are now enjoying their new surroundings – together.

ARL Community Cat Initiative

With approximately 700,000 community cats living throughout Massachusetts, ARL launched its Community Cat Initiative in 2018, and has already helped thousands of these animals in a variety of ways.

For more information about the initiative click here.

ARL Field Services

ARL Field Services provides technical and non-technical rescue operations for injured or lost domestic animals, livestock, and raptors (turkey vultures, osprey, hawks, eagles, falcons, and owls).

ARL Field Services also assists governmental agencies with equipment and training; and plays an essential role in assisting ARL Law Enforcement in cases of animal cruelty, neglect, and abuse.

If you need assistance, call (617) 426-9170 to reach ARL Field Services dispatch, which operates from 9:30 AM – 5:30 PM Tuesday-Saturday.


Stray Cat Found Under Porch Finds Perfect Match

Community Post Leads to Rescue

A home owner in Newton, MA, recently noticed a 13-week-old kitten seeking shelter under her house, and turned to a community forum website in an effort to find his owner.

The kitten was under the porch for seven days and when no one claimed ownership, an Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) volunteer reached out to help get him off the streets.

After privately messaging the home owner, the volunteer sprang into action by responding to the home and with the help of another dedicated volunteer, was able to trap the kitten within 10 minutes and transport him to ARL’s Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center.

Newton was given a thorough veterinary examination when he arrived at ARL, and it was clear that he had been on his own for a little bit.

The kitten was malnourished and underweight, his abdomen was distended, and ARL’s shelter medicine staff also detected a heart murmur.

Following his examination he was placed into foster care to rest and recuperate in a quiet, stress-free environment.

Newton spent a week in foster care, and after being neutered and reexamined, he found his way into the perfect home!

Volunteer for Animals in Need

ARL volunteers are at the core of fulfilling the mission to be an unwavering champion for animals in need.

ARL’s 840 dedicated volunteers donated more than 63,000 hours of their time in 2020!

Additionally, ARL’s 435 foster families took in nearly 850 animals in 2020, giving them the opportunity to spend time outside of the shelter environment, and in Newton’s case, recover from injury or illness in a quiet, loving space.

We are so grateful to all of our volunteers, and if you are interested in giving back for animals in need, click here to see what opportunities are available!


International Women’s Day: ARL’s Founder Ahead of Her Time

Anna Harris Smith Founded ARL in 1899

Today, March 8, marks International Women’s Day, a global day to acknowledge and celebrate the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women.

Anna Harris Smith, the founder of the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), was a strong, compassionate, and persistent woman, who decided to change the landscape of animal welfare in the United States – 21 years before she had the legal right to vote.

A social worker from Dorchester, she took action after seeing the cruel mistreatment of Boston’s working horses and the hordes of stray and homeless animals living on the streets.

Appalled by what she was seeing on a daily basis, Anna Harris Smith penned an editorial for the Boston Evening Transcript, where she advocated for a centrally located shelter facility for the rescue and care of homeless cats and dogs and remarked, “While getting dogs and cats off the street is work worth doing, the teaching of thoughtful kindness is the work that changes families, communities, and a nation.”

Anna Harris Smith

Anna Harris Smith

In February 1899, 110 people gathered at the Park Street Church in Boston for the very first meeting of the Animal Rescue League of Boston, and soon after opened the first shelter in the City of Boston, located at 68 Carver Street.

In 1907, Anna purchased a sprawling property in Dedham to serve as a sanctuary for working horses and homeless animals, and ARL’s Dedham campus continues to serve thousands of animals in need every year.

Through Anna’s fervor for humane education, and the growing impact of her work for animals in need, communities across the United States began to take notice, and used ARL as a model of how to form their own rescue societies.

Anna Harris Smith wrote and lectured extensively, tackling a host of humane issues of the time including the abandonment of pets, the abuse of working horses, transportation of livestock, and the importance of humane education for children.

In the first decades of the 20th-century, ARL’s work grew and Anna Harris Smith’s legacy was cemented.

Upon her passing in 1929, the American Humane Association stated “The passing of Mrs. Smith removes the outstanding woman in the history of animal protection in America. So long as humane history is preserved there will stand out among its records the name and fame of Mrs. Smith.”

A Lasting Legacy

Anna Harris Smith’s motto was “kindness uplifts the world”, the cornerstone on which ARL was built.

ARL has expanded greatly since Anna Harris Smith’s passing and as animal welfare evolves over time, one thing remains constant – the resolve and dedication by every ARL employee and volunteer to continue to honor her memory to uplift the world by one act of kindness at a time.

Choose to Challenge

This year’s theme for International Women’s Day is Choose to Challenge.

ARL was founded by the challenge to make change for the betterment of animals and society at large, and thanks to Anna Harris Smith’s incredible achievements, we continue to carry her legacy of change today.


Benji’s Remarkable Transformation

ARL granted bond request in case

In 2017, legislation was enacted in an effort to strengthen financial protections for animal care facilities like the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), who provide long-term care for an animal who is the subject of an active animal cruelty investigation and prosecution.

The legislation allows the prosecuting agency to request a court order for the accused to post a security bond, which can be used to recuperate costs of shelter, food, medical care, behavioral training, and other related costs.

If granted, the accused would have to either cover the bond or forfeit the animal.

ARL staunchly advocated for this piece of legislation, and in early 2021 ARL was granted a bond in a case dating back to late 2019. It was the first time since the passage of the legislation that ARL was granted such a bond.

Benji’s Story

ARL’s Law Enforcement Department took custody of Benji, now a four-year-old pitbull-type dog in November 2019 – along with dehydration, skin issues, foreign material in his stomach and other medical concerns, he was severely emaciated, weighing just 30 pounds, about half of what he should’ve weighed at the time.

Animal cruelty charges were filed, and while the case made its way through the judicial system, the incredibly friendly and resilient dog began his long journey to recovery.

Given the level of his emaciation, he was put on a strict feeding program and placed into foster care.

With dozens of shelter medicine visits and plenty of love and care, over time Benji got back to a normal weight, and his persistent skin issues were treated.

Case Closed

In early 2021, ARL was granted the security bond, and the accused ultimately agreed to forfeit Benji.

Caring for Benji for well over a year, his foster family had formed an amazing, loving bond, and wound up adopting him!

Benji Adopted

Advocating for Animals

The 2021-2022 Massachusetts legislative has begun and ARL’s Advocacy Department will continue to push for statewide legislation on issues critical to animal welfare in the Commonwealth.

Click here to see ARL’s legislative agenda and for more information on how you can be a voice for those who can’t speak for themselves.


Spay Waggin’ Treats Ill Community Kitten

Kitten needed eye removed due to severe infection

During a recent scheduled stop along the South Coast for the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Spay Waggin’, an 11-month-old community kitten from Westport, MA, came in to be neutered and was slated to be returned to the field.

However, this kitten needed additional veterinary care due to a severe upper respiratory infection.

The infection had impacted one of his eyes to the point of rupture, meaning he would need the infected eye removed.

ARL agreed to take over his care and he was transferred to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption center where the neuter and enucleation surgeries were performed.

As with every community cat that comes into ARL, the kitten, now named Mike Wazowski in honor of a character from the Pixar movie Monsters Inc., was assessed behaviorally to determine if he was to be returned to the field or put up for adoption.

Mike was social almost immediately, and his playful personality quickly won over staff and volunteers alike.

The resilient 11-month-old kitten recovered quickly from his surgeries and less than two weeks after coming to the Spay Waggin’, Mike found his perfect match and is loving his new home!

Spread the Love to Help Animals Like Mike All Year Long!

During the month of February, as many celebrate love and affection, ARL is Spreading the Love to highlight the love we share for our furry and feathered friends!

Animals like Mike give us so much. They provide comfort, happiness, and, of course, love. And animals have been a huge support for so many during these difficult months.

Here are 3 way to join us and Spread the Love:

  1. Express your love for animals by making a gift 
  2. Make a gift in honor of a love one and send a special Valentine’s Day message with an eCard or a mailed card
  3. Become a Champions Circle member and help animals in need all year long

ARL’s Champions Circle is a special group of 800+ dedicated individuals who provide support in the form of recurring (usually monthly) donors. Their generosity provides the critical support to keep animals safe and healthy all year long.

If you’re interested in joining this select group, use our secure online form or call Derek at (617) 226-5662 to set up your gift over the phone.


Wellness Waggin’ and Boston Veterinary Care Collaborate to Save Dog’s Life

An 11-year-old Chihuahua is beginning 2021 on a positive note, thanks to the collaboration of two Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) programs.

Just before the New Year, Delilah’s owner brought her to ARL’s Wellness Waggin’ for an exam and vaccines.

Upon exam, ARL’s vet team noticed a large inguinal hernia, as well as significant dental disease.

Delilah on the road to recovery.

Inguinal hernias are relatively common, and occur near the groin where the dog’s hind leg attaches to the body. Symptoms include swelling, vomiting, loss of appetite, lethargy, among others – if untreated, the condition could potentially be life-threatening.

Given the size of the hernia, the Wellness Waggin’ team referred Delilah’s owner to Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) for further examination. The animal required hernia surgery and dental work, however, cost was a barrier for Delilah’s owner.

Fortunately, the owner qualified for the Alice T. Whitney Helping Hands Fund, and the procedures were performed at no cost.

Delilah was spayed, the hernia was repaired, and also received a much-needed dental procedure.

“This was a great example of collaboration between ARL programs,” said Dr. Nicole Breda, BVC Medical Director. “Delilah’s hernia was certainly serious, but her dental disease was to a point where her jaw may have fractured due to the extent of infection…she needed help and I am pleased that BVC and the Alice T. Whitney Helping Hands Fund made it possible.”

Delilah made a quick recovery, and her owners are extremely grateful that ARL was able to provide the resources necessary to make their furry family member healthy and happy.

National Pet Dental Health Month

Delilah’s case is also a reminder about the importance of our pet’s dental health.

February is National Pet Dental Health Month, the perfect time to call your veterinarian and schedule a dental check-up.

Like humans, proper dental hygiene now can prevent potentially serious health issues later.

Common health problems associated with poor oral hygiene include blood or bone infection, diabetes, high blood pressure, among others. The pain caused by periodontal disease can also trigger poor appetite and lead to weight loss and nutritional deficiencies.

Discuss the best course of action with your primary veterinarian to see what the best plan is for your pet.

About the Alice T. Whitney Helping Hands Fund

Longtime ARL supporter and former Board member, Jane Whitney Marshall, established the Alice. T. Whitney Helping Hands Fund in memory of her grandmother,(a contemporary and friend of ARL Founder Anna Harris Smith), who became a vice president of ARL in 1916 and served on the Board of Directors from 1921 until her passing in 1955.

For many families, a significant veterinary expense may mean the difference between keeping or surrendering a beloved family pet. The Fund helps remove financial barriers which may otherwise prevent pet owners from accessing vital care for treatable medical emergencies.


February 14 is Pet Theft Awareness Day

5 tips to protect your pet from theft… and what to do if you’re a victim

Due to the ever-changing economy and the pet business becoming increasingly more lucrative, the scary truth is that pet theft is on the rise. Just as you wouldn’t leave a young child outside unsupervised, the same should go for your pet. With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, don’t forget to show your furry companion how much you love them by keeping them out of harm’s way.

If your pet goes missing, immediately contact your local animal control and shelters.

If your pet goes missing, immediately contact your local animal control and shelters.

Follow these 5 important tips to protect your pet from theft:

    1. At home, keep your pets supervised at all times. Think twice before letting your cat roam freely around the neighborhood or tying your pup to the tree in your front yard.
    2. Running an errand? Leave your pet at home. Although walking your dog while tackling your daily chores may seem like you’re accomplishing double-duty, the reality is that it only takes a few seconds for a dog-napper to take off with your pet.
    3. Follow the same rules for pets of all breeds and sizes. Although purebreds and small dogs tend to be the most desirable to a thief, big friendly dogs or mixed breeds can be just as easily lured into a get-away car waiting nearby.
    4. Spay or neuter your pet. February is National Spay and Neuter Awareness Month and ARL has been sharing the many health and behavioral benefits of the low-risk procedure. Another perk? Spayed or neutered pets are much less desirable to thieves, since they can’t be bred.
    5. Microchip your pet. It only takes a second for a thief to remove your pet’s collar, making them very difficult to identify should they turn up at an animal shelter or hospital. Quick and painless, microchipping your pet is extremely important to ensure that you and your pet are reunited.

If you find yourself in a situation where you think your pet was stolen:

    • Immediately file a report with your local police department and animal control.
    • Contact your pet’s microchip company, as well as local animal shelters and hospitals to see if your pet has turned up.
    • Post fliers around your neighborhood, especially in public spaces and businesses, with your pet’s photo, name, breed(s), color, weight and any distinguishing characteristics.
    • If you offer a reward, ask for a very detailed description of your pet and how they came into that person’s possession. If you suspect that you are being scammed, call the police.
    • Monitor newspaper ads and online postings to look for any that might fit your pet’s description.

PREVENT PET THEFT BEFORE IT HAPPENSReport any suspicious activity, or animal cruelty and neglect to ARL’s Law Enforcement team.