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Category: Law Enforcement
Press Release: ARL Law Enforcement, Dedham PD Investigating Deceased Dog Left on ARL Dedham Campus

The Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Law Enforcement Department and Dedham Police Department are jointly investigating a case of animal cruelty and abandonment, after an emaciated deceased dog was found on ARL’s Dedham campus.

The animal was discovered in late October, and while a number of leads have been followed, and numerous investigative tactics have been deployed, law enforcement is now asking for the public’s assistance to determine who may have left the dog and circumstances surrounding the incident.

The young adult Pitbull-type male dog was discovered by an ARL employee on October 25, 2021, with ARL Law Enforcement taking immediate action. A necropsy on the dog was performed on October 26, 2021, and concluded the animal suffered from severe malnutrition.

ARL Law Enforcement reached out to Dedham Police shortly thereafter, and the two agencies have since been jointly investigating the incident. Surveillance footage revealed that on October 23, 2021 at approximately 11:17 p.m., an SUV-type vehicle with two unidentified people inside entered ARL property and proceeded to leave the animal on a walkway before exiting the property.

Analysis of the video revealed that the suspect vehicle is likely a Nissan Rogue.

Anyone with information can contact ARL Law Enforcement at (617) 470-4266 x110 or email cruelty@arlboston.org, or Dedham Police Detective Kevin Mahoney at (781) 751-9301 or email kmahoney@police.dedham-ma.gov.

ARL Law Enforcement would like to thank the Dedham Police Department, the Massachusetts State Police Crime Lab, and the Norfolk County District Attorney’s Office for their ongoing assistance in investigating this matter.


2021 Flashback: 24 Dogs Rescued from Randolph Home

In early August, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Law Enforcement Department collaborated with the Randolph Police Department to remove 24 dogs, mostly puppies, from a home in Randolph, MA.

The Pitbull-type dogs were removed due to unsanitary conditions and inadequate access to food and water.

Randolph Police responded to the home for an unrelated matter, but when the four adult dogs and 20 puppies were discovered, the responding officers realized the animals were in need and immediately took action.

ARL Law Enforcement was contacted and responded to the scene, coordinating with ARL Field Services to safely remove the dogs and transport them to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center.

ARL’s shelter medicine team provided vaccinations, thorough exams, and medical care for the animals; one puppy did have a fractured leg, several others had umbilical hernias which required surgery, and heart murmurs were detected in a few of the dogs as well.

The dogs were placed into foster care and many found their perfect matches quickly.

“The Animal Rescue of Boston cannot commend Randolph Police and Animal Control enough,” stated ARL Law Enforcement Senior Investigator Lt. Alan Borgal. “Everyone involved in this situation demonstrated a high level of professionalism, compassion and the steadfast commitment to removing these animals from the residence quickly and getting them the care they needed.”

Randolph Police Commander Robert Emerson said, “We are pleased to have been able to remove these animals from the poor conditions they were living in. I would like to thank the ARL Law Enforcement and Field Services teams for their quick response and assistance at the scene, as well as the shelter medicine teams and foster care network for their dedication to caring for the dogs. I would also like to praise our responding officers who were called to the house on an unrelated issue and noticed that the situation the animals were living in was not acceptable.”

The rescue of these animals is a shining example of ARL’s work in action. Through ARL Law Enforcement, Field Services, Shelter Medicine, Shelter staff and volunteers, these wonderful dogs received the love, care and support they needed to get well and find their perfect homes to spend the holidays in!

There’s still time to make a difference for animals this year!

Your generous year-end gift will ensure that animals in need like all 24 of these pups can get the care they count on including, food, sanctuary, medical care, love, and emergency rescue if they are in danger.

We hope we can count on your support by making a gift today, as we continue to work to keep pets in homes and out of shelters.


Home for the Holidays: Abandoned Doves Land a Loving Home

In late October, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) assisted Chelsea Animal Control with four doves who were abandoned at a busy shopping plaza along the Revere Beach Parkway.

ARL Field Services transported the doves to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center, while ARL Law Enforcement launched an investigation to ascertain who may have left the birds.

The doves were left in a remote area of the shopping plaza in a cage, and while the birds were in overall good health, the question remains: who would simply leave these defenseless animals?

Whether furry or feathered, ARL is committed to helping animals in need, and these doves soon made themselves at home in ARL’s iconic Dedham barn, received veterinary care, and awaited the day where they could find a loving family.

ARL Law Enforcement continues to investigate this case of animal abandonment, and asks anyone with information regarding these animals to contact ARL Law Enforcement at (617) 426-9170 x110, or email cruelty@arlboston.org.

Going Home

That day came in early December, when the doves were adopted by a bird enthusiast.

The doves, now named Ghandi, Lennon, King, and Mandela, have overcome their ordeal and are now thriving in their new home.

There’s still time to make a difference for animals this year!

Your generous year-end gift will ensure that animals in need like Ghandi, Lennon, King, and Mandela, can get the care they count on including, food, sanctuary, medical care, love, and emergency rescue if they are in danger.

We hope we can count on your support by making a gift today, as we continue to work to keep pets in homes and out of shelters.


Press Release: ARL Caring for Two Emaciated Dogs Found in Avon, MA Park

ARL Law Enforcement investigating, asking public for information

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is currently caring for two emaciated Pitbull-type dogs that were likely abandoned this past week in a park in Avon, MA.

ARL’s Law Enforcement Department is collaborating with the Avon Police Department to investigate the incident as a case of animal cruelty/abandonment, and are asking the public for any information regarding the case.

The dogs, one male and one female, were found at D.W. Field Park on Friday, December 17, at approximately 10 a.m., near the Avon Reservoir.

They were extremely frightened and had no collars or microchips for identification. Avon Police responded to the scene and proceeded to contact ARL Law Enforcement.

ARL transported the animals to its Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center, and were examined by ARL veterinarians.

The dogs, who are incredibly friendly, are estimated to be about a year old and were emaciated to the point of starvation.

Additionally, numerous abrasions were found on both dogs on the face, muzzle, chest and head areas.

A feeding plan has been implemented to help the dogs gain weight slowly and safely, and the dogs will remain in the care of ARL until they are healthy enough to find new homes.

Please note the animals are not currently available for adoption.

ARL Law Enforcement would like to thank the Avon Police Department for their compassion and response to help these animals who were in dire need of assistance.

How you can help these dogs right now: 

  1. Spread the word. We are collaborating with the Avon Police Department to investigate the incident as a case of animal cruelty/abandonment, and are asking the public for any information regarding the case.  Anyone with information is urged to contact ARL Law Enforcement at (617) 426-9170 x110 or email cruelty@arlboston.org, or Avon Police at (508) 583-6677. 
  1. Make a donation.  Your emergency gift today can support:
    • Veterinary care and rehabilitation for animals that have suffered the trauma of neglect
    • On-going investigations of cruelty to pursue justice for animals
    • Emergency response when crisis strikes and animals are in dire need


Press Release: ARL Law Enforcement Seeking Information in Trio of Abandonment Cases

ARL reminds pet owners that abandoning an animal is never an option

The Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Law Enforcement Department is currently investigating three separate cases involving abandoned animals initiated in just the past week alone, and is reaching out to the public to obtain information relating to where the animals may have come from.

The latest case involves four doves that were left in a cage in the parking lot of a shopping center in Chelsea.

Chelsea Animal Control contacted ARL in the late afternoon hours on Thursday, October 19 to assist with the birds located at 1083 Revere Beach Parkway.

Surveillance video in the area does show an adult male in a dark-colored Ford Explorer (2006-2010 model) pull into a parking space, place the cage on the ground and then drive away.

The suspect vehicle is also missing part of the roof rack on the passenger side, and has rear quarter-panel damage, also on the passenger side.

The birds were transferred to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center and are overall in good health.

Anyone with information pertaining to this ongoing investigation is urged to contact ARL Law Enforcement at 617-426-9170 x110 or cruelty@arlboston.org.

Additionally, this past week, two abandoned kittens were discovered in a box in an alley along the Fenway, and an owned cat was left in its carrier outside of ARL’s Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center.

All animals involved have been medically checked by ARL shelter medicine staff, are doing well, and will soon be available to find new homes.

Abandoning an animal is a felony offense in Massachusetts, punishable by a $5,000 fine and up to 7 years in jail.

ARL is Here to Help

ARL’s focus is to keep pets and people together, but understands that circumstances may arise when pet ownership may no longer be feasible, and offers pet surrender services at its Boston, Dedham and Cape Cod locations to assist with this difficult decision.

If you are no longer able to care for your pet and need to surrender, please call 617-426-9170 (follow the prompts for the admissions office closest to you).


Press Release: Last Dog from Randolph Law Enforcement Case Still Seeking New Home

In early-August, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Law Enforcement Department collaborated with Randolph Police to rescue 24 dogs living in unsanitary conditions from a private residence.

The dogs were removed from the home, and the previous owner has been charged with two dozen counts of animal cruelty.

Of the 20 puppies and 4 adult dogs, all have found loving homes — with the exception of Benjamin, a 2-year-old male Pitbull-type dog.

When Benjamin arrived at ARL, staff noted that while extremely friendly, the young dog lacked socialization, focus, and basic manners.

He was excitable, jumpy/mouthy, and reactive to walking on a leash.

Over the past two months, ARL’s behavioral staff and volunteers have worked extensively with Benjamin, and he has made tremendous strides maintaining focus and working on his manners.

ARL is looking forward to finding Benjamin his new home and is committed to providing behavioral council and advice for his new family once he’s home.

Click here to see Benjamin’s online profile. 

Original Release:

RANDOLPH, MA — On Wednesday, Aug. 4 at approximately noon, Randolph Police officers responded to a home on Bossi Avenue after receiving a report that a male resident at the home had threatened a person who was doing work at the residence.

Upon arrival, officers spoke with the suspect, later identified as URIE LOUISSAINT, AGE 28, OF RANDOLPH, who consented to a search of his home. Officers entered the home and found its interior to be in a state of squalor with animal waste throughout.

Inside the home, officers located four adult dogs and 20 puppies allegedly living in unsanitary conditions without adequate access to food and water.

The Animal Rescue League of Boston’s Law Enforcement Department was immediately contacted and responded to the scene, coordinating with ARL Field Services to remove the dogs and transport them to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center.

In all, one male and three female dogs that are approximately two to four years of age, and 20 puppies ranging from two to four months old — all believed to be Pitbull-type dogs — were removed from the home. ARL’s shelter medicine team has examined the dogs.

One puppy, a 4-month-old male, was determined to have a broken leg and will remain in ARL’s care until healed. Umbilical hernias have been detected in some of the dogs, which will require surgery before adoption and some of the animals have heart murmurs.

“The Animal Rescue of Boston cannot commend Randolph Police and Animal Control enough,” stated ARL Law Enforcement Senior Investigator Lt. Alan Borgal. “Everyone involved in this situation demonstrated a high level of professionalism, compassion and the steadfast commitment to removing these animals from the residence quickly and getting them the care they needed.”

Randolph Police Commander Robert Emerson said, “We are pleased to have been able to remove these animals from the poor conditions they were living in. I would like to thank the ARL Law Enforcement and Field Services teams for their quick response and assistance at the scene, as well as the shelter medicine teams and foster care network for their dedication to caring for the dogs. I would also like to praise our responding officers who were called to the house on an unrelated issue and noticed that the situation the animals were living in was not acceptable.”

LOUISSAINT was charged with 24 counts of Animal Cruelty and one count of Threats to Commit a Crime. He was issued a summons to appear in court and will be arraigned at a later date at Quincy District Court.


ARL Assists Randolph Police in Animal Cruelty Investigation

ARL Caring for 20 Puppies, 4 Adult Dogs Removed from Home 

The Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Law Enforcement Department were recently contacted by police in Randolph, MA, to assist in the removal of two dozen dogs, mostly puppies, who were living in unsanitary conditions.

Randolph Police entered the home and found its interior to be in a state of squalor with animal waste throughout.

Inside the home, officers located four adult dogs and 20 puppies allegedly living in unsanitary conditions without adequate access to food and water.

ARL’s Law Enforcement Department was immediately contacted and responded to the scene, coordinating with ARL Field Services to remove the dogs and transport them to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center.

In all, one male and three female dogs that are approximately two to four years of age, and 20 puppies ranging from two to four months old — all believed to be Pitbull-type dogs — were removed from the home.

ARL’s shelter medicine team has examined the dogs. One puppy, a 4-month-old male, was determined to have a broken leg and will remain in ARL’s care until healed.

Umbilical hernias have been detected in some of the dogs, which will require surgery before adoption and some of the animals have heart murmurs. The dogs have been placed into foster care and are not currently available for adoption.

It is expected that most the dogs will be ready to find new homes within a few weeks.

“The Animal Rescue of Boston cannot commend Randolph Police and Animal Control enough,” stated ARL Law Enforcement Senior Investigator Lt. Alan Borgal. “Everyone involved in this situation demonstrated a high level of professionalism, compassion and the steadfast commitment to removing these animals from the residence quickly and getting them the care they needed.”

Randolph Police Commander Robert Emerson said, “We are pleased to have been able to remove these animals from the poor conditions they were living in. I would like to thank the ARL Law Enforcement and Field Services teams for their quick response and assistance at the scene, as well as the shelter medicine teams and foster care network for their dedication to caring for the dogs. I would also like to praise our responding officers who were called to the house on an unrelated issue and noticed that the situation the animals were living in was not acceptable.”

How You Can Help

Animals saved from these situations can have many complex health and behavior issues.

They’re sick, frightened, and in desperate need of love and kindness.

They will need extraordinary care and you can give them their best chance to recover.

Your emergency gift today can support:

    • Veterinary care and rehabilitation for the sudden influx of animals that have suffered the trauma of neglect
    • On-going investigations of cruelty to pursue justice for animals
    • Emergency response when crisis strikes and animals are in dire need

This work cannot be done alone and animals urgently need your help now.

Click here to donate and help these animals in their recovery and thank you!


ARL Teams with MSP to Remind Pet Owners About the Dangers of Leaving an Animal in a Hot Vehicle

When the Temperature Rises – It’s Too Hot for Spot®!

As New England continues to see extremely hot summer conditions, this week, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) teamed up with Massachusetts State Police (MSP) for ARL’s 8th annual summer safety campaign, Too Hot for Spot®, to remind pet owners about the dangers of leaving an animal in a hot car.

ARL and MSP held a press event at the Massachusetts State Police Headquarters in Framingham, MA, flanked by two K9 troopers and a demonstration of how quickly the interior of a vehicle can heat up.

A large thermometer was placed in an MSP cruiser, and with an outside temperature of 82 degrees, in just 10 minutes the interior of the vehicle heated up to over 120 degrees!

Unlike humans, animals cannot efficiently cool their bodies. And if you think that cracking the windows will help keep your pet cool – it won’t.

As demonstrated, the inside of a vehicle can heat up to well over 100 degrees in a matter of minutes, and the stifling heat inside a car makes animals susceptible to heat stroke, and the onset of symptoms is rapid.

Common symptoms of heat stroke in animals include lethargy or weakness, heavy panting, glazed eyes, profuse salivation, excessive thirst, lack of coordination, a deep red or purple tongue, vomiting – and it can even cause seizures, unconsciousness, or death.

With the onset of heat stroke, every second counts, so if your pet is experiencing any of these symptoms, it is critical that you take them immediately to the closest veterinary hospital for treatment.

Health hazards aside, it is also against the law in Massachusetts to keep an animal confined in a vehicle when extreme heat or cold may threaten the animal’s health – and law enforcement throughout the Commonwealth will be on the lookout throughout the summer.

“Keeping an animal in a hot vehicle is dangerous, potentially deadly and illegal,” stated Massachusetts State Police Colonel Christopher Mason. “The Massachusetts State Police, along with law enforcement agencies across the Commonwealth will be steadfast in enforcing this law to keep animals in Massachusetts safe.”

“While pet owners should be well aware of the dangers of leaving animals alone in vehicles during the warm weather months, we sadly still see numerous examples of animals suffering and even dying every year, as the result of being left in the car,” said Dr. Edward Schettino, ARL President and CEO.

Please, when it is hot outside, leave your pet at home. Set them up in a cool, humidity and temperature-controlled room, give them plenty of water, and make sure to limit their outdoor exercise to the morning or evening hours when it is coolest.

To learn more summer pet safety tips, visit arlboston.org/too-hot-for-spot.

Thank You!

ARL would like to thank the Massachusetts State Police for helping spread ARL’s Too Hot for Spot® summer safety campaign to the masses.

Additionally, over the past few years, MassDot has generously donated billboard space for ARL’s Too Hot for Spot® messaging, so drives across the Commonwealth will be reminded of the dangers of leaving an animal in a hot vehicle. ARL thanks you!


Press Release: Paralyzed French Bulldog Abandoned at South End Park

ARL Law Enforcement seeking information

The Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Law Enforcement Department is seeking information regarding a paralyzed French Bulldog that was recently abandoned at Peters Park, located in Boston’s South End.

The approximately three-year-old female dog nicknamed “French Fry” was found on a weekend in late April just outside the dog park area.

Witnesses stated seeing a man and woman with the dog for a short time before walking away from the animal.

The couple were seen wearing masks, making it difficult for witnesses to describe any identifying features.

“French Fry” was abandoned at Peters Park in Boston’s South End.

ARL Law Enforcement has obtained surveillance video of the area and is currently reviewing it to try and identify the dog’s owners.

Upon finding the dog, a Good Samaritan brought the animal to a local veterinary clinic for examination.

Staff at the veterinary clinic confirmed the dog’s hind-limb paralysis, and also noted she was dehydrated, suffered hemorrhaging in the left eye, and had an elevated body temperature.

Given the paralysis, the dog was brought to another veterinary hospital for a neurological exam and MRI.

The exam and imaging revealed intervertebral disc disease (IVDD), which can be common in the breed.

Given the severity of the disease and the further possibly life-threatening complications which may have developed, surgery was not an option for French Fry, and the decision for humane euthanasia was made in order to end her suffering.

While the dog’s condition was deemed genetic, abandoning an animal is a felony in Massachusetts, punishable by up to 7 years in jail and a $5,000 fine.

ARL understands that dealing with medical issues with pets can be financially and emotionally overwhelming. With options and resources available, including animal surrender, no animal should ever be abandoned.

If anyone recognizes the dog, they are asked to contact ARL’s Law Enforcement Department at (617) 426-9170 x110, or email cruelty@arlboston.org.


ARL Testifies for Virtual Legislative Hearing

On Wednesday, the Joint Committee on the Judiciary met to hear testimony on 19 specific animal protection bills, with the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) testifying in favor of a proposed citation bill.

A citation statute does currently exist in Massachusetts, however it only applies to dogs. ARL believes the law needs to be expanded to include other animals, including livestock and farm animals.

An Act enhancing the issuance of citation for cruel conditions for animals (S.1097/H.1840) would define cruel conditions and appropriate shelter for most animals.

It would also allow animal control officers and law enforcement personnel to issue civil citations for violations, which would include a $50 fine for a first offense, $200 for a second offense, and up to $500 for subsequent offenses.

Additionally, after a third offense, the animal(s) involved could be subject to seizure.

Currently, animal cruelty in Massachusetts is a felony offense, subject to a $5,000 fine and up to seven years in prison, however ARL believes that a lesser penalty is necessary to give law enforcement a tool to intervene before cruelty or neglect rises to a felony level, particularly with farm animals and overcrowding/hoarding situations.

“This bill would give law enforcement an extra tool to allow us to get to the root of the problem before it reaches a criminal level,” ARL Law Enforcement Investigator Lt. Alan Borgal, stated to the committee.

The need for such a statute came to light in 2016, following the largest farm animal cruelty case in New England history that involved well over 1,000 animals at a tenant farm in Westport, MA, and resulted in 151 counts of animal cruelty levied against more than 20 individuals.

The case involved chronic neglect, however advocates believe that had civil citations been available to law enforcement, it may have been possible to intervene earlier.

“In the case of many of these animals, there was no ability of animal control officers or law enforcement to intervene until the situation became dire,” ARL Director of Advocacy Allison Blanck, told the panel.

With the hearing concluded, the Joint Committee on the Judiciary will now discuss the proposed bills internally and determine which pieces of legislation will move on to the next step of the legislative process.

How you can get involved

Thanks to a new rule this session, it’s not too late to ask your legislators to sign on as co-sponsors!

If your legislator is on the Judiciary Committee, it’s even more important to ask for their support! Find your legislator here.

To learn more about other hearings and opportunities to get involved, fill out the form here.

Advocating for animals in Massachusetts

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) monitors and advocates for statewide legislation on issues critical to animal welfare in the Commonwealth. Our legislative agenda highlights our priorities for the two year session.

To view ARL’s legislative agenda in its entirety and to track the progress of proposed legislation click here!