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Articles Tagged with: ARLBoston
I Found A Baby Bird. What Do I Do Now?

The ARL provides tips on when and how to rescue a baby bird on the ground

Spring has sprung. The sun is shining. Flowers are blooming. And baby birds are learning to fly.

This time of year, The ARL receives phone calls from concerned citizens who come across baby birds on the ground. Although this sight may seem alarming, remember that part of the process of learning to fly comes with being on the ground. It’s typically best to keep a safe distance and not to intervene unless you’re sure the bird is orphaned or is in immediate danger.

To decide whether or not to step in the next time you spot a baby bird on the ground, follow this helpful flow chart:

What to do if you find a baby bird - flowchart

If the flow chart points you toward intervention, follow these 11 steps to ensure a safe rescue:

How to rescue a baby bird*†:

  1. Grab clean container with a lid and line the bottom with a soft cloth. Poke air holes if there are none.
  2. Wear gloves to protect yourself from the bird’s beak, talons, wings, and any potential parasites.
  3. Cover the bird with a light sheet or towel.
  4. Gently pick up the bird and place it in the prepared container.
  5. Warm the bird if it’s chilled by placing one end of the container on top of a heating pad (low setting) or in a shallow dish of warm water. You can also wrap the container with the warm cloth.
  6. Tape the container closed.
  7. Note exactly where you found the bird. This will be very important for release.
  8. Keep the bird in a warm dark quiet place away from children and animals. Do not give it food or water.
  9. Wash your hands and any clothing and objects that were in contact with the bird to avoid spreading any potential parasites.
  10. Contact a wildlife rehabilitator, state wildlife agency, or wildlife veterinarian.
  11. Get the bird to the wildlife expert as soon as possible. It is against the law in most states to keep wild animals in your home if you do not have a permit, even if you plan to release them.

To find a wildlife expert in your area, contact the New England Wildlife Center.

 

*Only adults should rescue baby birds. Before rescuing an adult bird, seek guidance from a wildlife expert.

†Source: Healers of the Wild: People Who Care For Injured and Orphaned Wildlife, By Shannon K. Jacobs


See Something, Say Something – Report Animal Cruelty

April is Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Awareness Month

In support of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month this April, the ARL is kicking off its Spring “See Something, Say Something – Report Animal Cruelty” campaign.

Animal cruelty comes in many forms, including physical abuse, neglect of basic care, abandonment, dog fighting, and animal hoarding. Because many studies have demonstrated a strong link between cruelty to animals and other forms of domestic and community violence, prevention plays a critical role in improving the safety and welfare of both animals and people in Massachusetts.

Know your state’s animal cruelty laws

In 2014, the ARL’s Center for Animal Protection assisted in over 300 animal law enforcement cases. Unfortunately, this is a small number when you consider the startling statistic that 4 out of 5 animal cruelty cases go unreported.

We all have a role to play in prevention. Be aware and get to know the animals in your neighborhood. If you suspect animal cruelty, call your local authorities right away.  Help raise awareness and educate others about this issue.

Learn the 7 most common warning signs of animal cruelty and take action!

While most of us recognize that punching, kicking, burning, choking, or hitting an animal with an object are acts of animal Give a voice to animals.cruelty, there are also several more subtle warning signs of animal cruelty to watch for that could indicate mistreatment, neglect, or abuse:

  1. Howling or barking for a sustained period of time or hearing an animal cry in pain with higher pitched, more persistent vocal sounds than usual.
  2. Singed, matted, chronically or excessively dirty hair or fur.
  3. Wounds, unusual scars, hair loss, frequent limping often on different legs, or signs of improper nutrition such as weight loss or prominent visible ribs.
  4. Animals kept caged or tied with little room to move for long periods of time or without regular interaction with people
  5. Lack of protection from the weather or fece- or debris-strewn living areas for animals.
  6. Collars, leashes, or halters so tight they visibly dig into the animal’s face or neck.
  7. A large number of animals coming or going from a property.

If you know of or suspect animal cruelty, report concerns to your local authorities.  Learn more about how you can prevent animal cruelty at arlboston.org/take-action

Report suspicions of animal cruelty. If you see something, say something.


Do You Have Feral Cats In Your Neighborhood?

Help keep them safe by building a simple DIY cat shelter in your yard

A “feral” cat is defined as a cat that has had little or no human contact since birth. Many were initially former domestic cats that were either lost or abandoned. In many cases, these cats still depend on human caregivers for food and shelter.

Learn more about feral cats

Some feral cat colonies find shelter for themselves under sheds and uninhabited buildings. Living in these structures poses a risk for these cats because their safety is usually uncertain.

To help keep the feral cats in your neighborhood safe from the elements and potential predators, consider building your own shelter. DIY shelters are inexpensive and simple to build. Please keep in mind, there are many ways to build feral cat shelters.

Watch this video to learn how to build your own feral cat shelter:

Did you know…

That the ARL contributes to helping control the feral cat population in the Boston area? The ARL offers FREE spay and neuter TNR (trap, neuter, and release) clinics each year to feral cat caretakers in Boston.

During the clinics, cats receive a behavioral screening to identify “friendlies,” stray animals who could re-adjust to living with people as pets.  In addition to spay/neuter services, cats also receive vaccines and other veterinary services.

Learn more about the ARL’s TNR clinics by visiting www.arlboston.org/fix-a-feral/


Baby Alert! Mini-Donkey Gives Birth to Healthy Baby

Mini-Donkey Rescued from Illegal Ludlow Petting Zoo Gives Birth in New Home

Baby Alice

Baby Alice

Yesterday morning Loretta, a mini-donkey who was adopted from our Dedham shelter on March 24, gave birth to a healthy baby girl. The birth went perfectly and did not need any intervention. Both mom and baby, now named Alice, are doing well!

According to Alyssa Kane, one of our Dedham shelter agents, “this baby is quite possibly the cutest thing you’ll see in a long time!”

Congrats to the new mom and her adopters.

We are very excited to report that Loretta and Alice will be staying together! They live on a beautiful farm where mom and baby will get to foster their beautiful mother-daughter bond.

06-03-14 Loretta & Baby Donkey

Loretta is one of 35 animals that the ARL, together with MSPCA-Angell, rescued from an illegal traveling petting zoo in Ludlow, Massachusetts back in February.

Read the full story about the rescue.

Most of the animals found permanent homes, but we still have three animals at our Dedham barn from that rescue who are waiting patiently for someone to adopt them.

Ross – a pony, Phoebe – a pony, and Chandler – a goat, are all hopeful that someone will adopt them soon! You can learn more about all of them on our adoptable animals page.


Thank You Thursday: Community Support Leads to Dog Play Yard Renovation

K-9 Grass Coming Soon to ARL Dog Play-Yard

We’re delighted to share that the Animal Rescue League’s application for permission to install K-9 grass in the Boston play yard was unanimously approved by the South End Landmarks Commission last week.

The proposed K-9 grass represents a huge improvement over the current stone/grass/dirt surface, which will be very good for dogs and for the appearance of the space.

Our application sailed through on both its merits and with the overwhelming support expressed by our South End neighbors and Mayor Walsh’s office. We were able to submit a total of 432 signatures expressing community support for our project!

There are many people to thank for organizing our presentation and collecting signatures.

Our volunteers as always stepped up in a big way. Thank you to Astrid and Peter Rapoza, Mal Malme, Maria Uribe, Michelle S, Marna Terry and Kerry and Gus Pena.

Along with our volunteers, several local businesses collected signatures including Berkeley Perk,  Rome’s Pizza, Emelio’s Pizza, Billy’s Lunch Café and the Berkeley Barber Shop.

We’d also like to thank ARL staff, especially Bob Williams our Director of Facilities who was the champion of this project. Bob left no stone unturned from the research for finding the right surface material, to the presentation and overall coordination.

“I am very grateful for the above and beyond effort here; it will mean so much to ARL and dogs in our care,” said ARL president, Mary Nee.

Construction will start this summer! Stay tuned for details.

Dog Play Yard After


Thank You Thursday: Feral Cat Clinic Volunteers Make it Happen

Last Feral Clinic of the Spring Yields 5 “Friendly” Cats

Feral Clinic PhotoThank you so much to all of our volunteers and staff who participated Sunday’s “Fix a Feral” cat clinic. These clinics rely on volunteers and we were happy to see so many new faces! We admitted 65 cats to the clinic, five of which were found to be “friendly” and were admitted to our Boston shelter.

One of the cats who we admitted has a microchip. After tracing her chip we found that she was adopted from one of our shelters several years ago. Unfortunately, all the phone numbers that we have are no longer in service, but our Boston shelter manager sent a certified letter to the last known address and we’ll see if an owner is found!

This serves as an important reminder to 1) microchip your cats and 2) keep your contact information up-to-date. If a cat that has gone missing is brought in to one of our clinics and has a microchip with current contact information. We’ll be able to reunite the cat with his/her owner. Remember, even indoor cats escape sometimes!

We’d also like to thank Bertucci’s for generously donating lunch for our volunteers to help get them through the long day!

feral cat clinic catOur next Fix-a-Feral cat clinics will take place in the fall.

If you’re interested in becoming a trapper and helping TNR (trap/neuter/release) a feral cat community near you, please email feralcatinfo@arlboston.org today. We’re always in need of more feral cat trappers.

Learn more about feral cats: arlboston.org/fix-a-feral


Registration is Now Open for Winter Dog Training Classes

Enroll with Your Pup Today!

Dog Training SignWinter dog-training registration is now open. Our experienced trainers offer beginner and advanced level classes for dogs of all ages. The following classes are starting soon.

Classes starting: Saturday, 11/01, Sunday, 11/16, Saturday 01/03 and Sunday, 01/11.

Puppy Kindergarten. A six-week course for puppies 8-20 weeks old. Classes include: an off leash puppy play period for puppy socialization, training games for the enjoyment of both puppies and owners, basic commands, and discussions about puppy behavior problems, proper nutrition and veterinary care.

Good Manners. A six-week course designed for dogs 5 months and older. Basic commands such as sit, down, stay, loose leash walking, coming when called, leave it, and no jumping are all covered.  Greeting skills both toward other dogs and toward people will also be worked on.

ADVANCED PUPPY: A six-week course designed for dogs 4 months to 11 months. Classes include: an off-leash puppy play period for puppy socialization, training games for the enjoyment of both puppies and owners, continuing basic commands such as sit, down, stay, loose leash walking, coming when called, leave it, and no jumping (with and without distractions). Requirement: must have completed Puppy Kindergarten

ADVANCED GOOD MANNERS: A six-week course designed for dogs 5 months and older. Your dogs will accompany you to all six classes and they will learn ‘go to your place’, train with distractions, attention and much more. Requirement: must have completed Puppy Kindergarten or Good Manners class.

 

 

Enroll in the Class: arlboston.org/dog-training/enroll-in-class/


Thank You Thursday: Celebrity Dog, Tuna, Helps Animals at ARL

ARL Joined Tuna at the Revere Hotel

Tuna loves his ARL "See Something, Say Something" doggie t-shirt!

Tuna loves his ARL “See Something, Say Something” doggie t-shirt!

We’re very grateful to Tuna Melts My Heart and BarkBox for choosing to raise awareness and funds for the Animal Rescue League during the Boston leg of the Tuna Tour!

Last Wednesday, we joined Tuna and his delightful mom, Courtney, at the Revere Hotel Boston Common for their Meet and Greet Event, one of several on their U.S. tour where they’re raising awareness about animal shelters everywhere.

Tuna is a lovable a 3 year-old rescue Chiweenie who has captured the hearts of animal lovers across the U.S. His Instagram account has made him quite the canine celebrity. He’s even been on E!.

Hundreds of people lined up outside the event for a chance to meet Tuna. The very generous animal lovers donated over $500 to support shelter pets here at the ARL. Several people who donated received our limited release ARL “See Something, Say Something” doggie t-shirts.

Thank you to Tuna, BarkBox and The Revere Hotel for giving us the opportunity to participate in this event and get the word out about the great work of the Animal Rescue League of Boston.

If you have a dog and want to register for BarkBox  – a monthly box of dog goodies delivered to your door –  now’s the time! If you register for BarkBox using this link barkbox.com/tuna, you’ll get 10% off your order and BarkBox will donate $15 for each subscription to eight animal shelters nation-wide, including the ARL!

A chihuahua learning all about the ARL's services while waiting in line.

A chihuahua learning all about the ARL’s services while waiting in line.

A curious pup wants some ARL swag.

A curious pup wants some ARL swag.

Dog with T

Happy about their ARL “See Something, Say Something” t-shirt!

 

 

 


Closing Thoughts on Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month From Mary Nee

Today, the last day of April, concludes Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month.

Mary & Mickey square

ARL president, Mary Nee

Bringing greater attention to the issue is, of course, central to what the ARL does all year long, yet if you asked me why should we bring greater attention to the issue of animal cruelty, I’d say the reasons go well beyond the mission of our organization.

Reason #1: Animal cruelty is a big problem.

In 2013, the ARL assisted in the investigation of 567 cases of animal cruelty—that’s more than one case a day and we’re just one of many organizations and law enforcement agencies in the state legally pursuing animal welfare issues.

When you consider that at least 80% of animal cruelty remains undiscovered, the magnitude of the problem truly sinks in.

Reason #2: Animal cruelty can indicate other illegal activity, domestic abuse, and mental illness.

Animal cruelty can take many forms.  The intentions behind deliberately inflicting injuries or failing to provide minimum care and nutrition can vary.

Sometimes an animal is physically abused or denied basic care for sport or other financial gain, as in the case of staged dog fighting.  Other times, an animal is intentionally harmed to physically or emotionally intimidate a partner or family member.  In still others, a hoarding compulsion quickly overwhelms an owner’s ability to provide basic care and nutrition to the animals living in the home or on the property.

In each situation, however, the safety and well-being of animals, people, and our communities are all potentially at risk.

Startling statistics remind us of the strong connection between animal cruelty and other forms of violence and criminal behavior.  In a Massachusetts study, for example, 70% of animal abusers had criminal records including crimes involving violence, property, drugs, or disorderly behavior (Arluke & Luke, 1997).

Reason #3: What we do to address animal cruelty reflects our tolerance for other forms of family and community violence.

Heightened awareness of how animals are cared for and treated not only helps reduce the number of tragic cases of animal suffering, but also moves us closer to a more just and humane society where both people and animals are valued.

Whether it’s violence against an animal, child, or an adult, we should all do something to stop it from happening.

Reporting suspicions of animal cruelty to local authorities plays a critical role in prevention.  As we have talked about all this month, if when you see something, please say something and call your local police. 

You will make a tremendous difference in the lives of people and animals.

– Mary Nee, President of the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Test your knowledge of animal cruelty issues by taking the ARL’s Animal Cruelty Quiz and learn more about what you can do to prevent animal cruelty at arlboston.org/take-action


Animal Cruelty and Human Violence: Q&A with Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore

Today marks the end of Animal Cruelty and Human Violence Awareness week, a time to discuss the growing body of evidence demonstrating the strong connection between animal abuse and other forms of family and community violence.

Law enforcement agencies, including the International Association of Chiefs of Police have expressed concern about the relationship between animal cruelty, domestic violence, child and elder abuse, usually referred to as “The Link”.  Studies have confirmed a relationship between animal abuse and other violent crimes.

Download our fact sheet on animal cruelty and human violence.

Dr. Smith X-Ray

Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore

We asked Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, vice president of animal welfare at the ARL, for her perspective on the link between animal cruelty and human violence.  Here’s what she had to say:

ARL Blog: How would you define “animal abuse?”

Dr. Smith-Blackmore: Animal abuse can include physical abuse (non-accidental injury), emotional abuse, neglect, sexual abuse and staged animal fights.

Physical abuse is characterized by the deliberate inflicting of injuries or causing pain, including inappropriate methods of training. Emotional abuse may include repeated or sustained ‘mental violence’(intimidation through loud yelling or threatening behaviors) or deliberate isolation through the  withholding social interactions.

Neglect is the failure to provide adequate levels of food, water, shelter, and veterinary care to animals. Sexual abuse includes any sexual conduct with animals, which may or may not result in physical injury to the animal.

Unfortunately, examples of all of these kinds of animal abuse have been investigated by the ARL’s Law Enforcement department.  Last year alone, our Law Enforcement team led or assisted in the investigation of 576 cruelty cases.

ARL Blog:  Most people would agree that reporting animal cruelty helps the animals involved and for that reason is importance to do.  But is there an even bigger impact reporting animal cruelty has on a community?

Dr. Smith-Blackmore: Absolutely.  Animal abuse is an important social issue affecting animals, families, and communities.

Recognizing and reporting animal abuse is especially important, due to the link between animal abuse and human violence. A correlation between animal abuse, family violence and other forms of community violence has been established.

Family and animal protection professionals have recognized this connection, noting that abuse of children, elders, domestic partners and animals result in a self-perpetuating cycle of violence.

ARL Blog:  So reporting concerns about animal cruelty can really make a difference to both animals and people?

Dr. Smith-Blackmore: Yes, when animals in a home are abused or neglected, it’s a warning sign that others in the household may not be safe. In addition, children who witness animal abuse are harmed and are also at a greater risk of becoming abusers themselves.

Laws provide animals with protection from abuse; however successful prosecution depends on reporting by witnesses to law enforcement authorities.  Protecting animals and creating safe and humane communities has to be a priority for us all.

Learn more about animal cruelty and domestic violence.

For more on this topic visit arlboston.org/take-action