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Category: Adoption
Sato Undergoes Costly Emergency Hernia Surgery

Tinker Expected to Make Full Recovery

Tinker, a 3-year-old Italian Greyhound Mix, was one of 11 dogs who came to the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) just after Christmas as part of a transport from All Sato Rescue in Puerto Rico. Being jet-bound from the island to Boston likely saved Tinker’s life.

According to All Sato, Tinker’s owner had moved after Hurricane Maria, and had simply left the sweet and loving dog behind. While initially seeming perfectly healthy, several days after her arrival in Boston, Tinker was spayed, and following surgery, ARL veterinary staff noticed she was having a hard time breathing.

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Tinker’s surgery was a success and she is on the road to recovery!

X-rays were taken and confirmed the diagnosis of a diaphragmatic hernia — a protrusion of the abdominal viscera into the diaphragm caused by a tear, which prohibits the lungs from expanding normally.  Despite attempts to make her comfortable, Tinker continued to have breathing issues, and was transferred to an Emergency Specialty Hospital for surgery.

Tinker’s condition was likely caused by a previous trauma, such as being hit by a car. She remained stable by probably limiting her activity but one thing is certain — she is lucky to have made it to ARL to have the problem corrected before she suffered from any life-threatening complications.

Road to Recovery

Tinker will remain in foster care for a little while longer as she continues to heal from her surgery, but will soon be made available for adoption so be sure to check back for updates!

YOU Can Help Even More Animals Like Tinker in 2018!

Tinker’s life-saving surgery cost approximately $4,500, and while animals like Tinker depend on us to care for them and make them well, we depend on YOU to support and help us continue our critical work. Animals at ARL receive the specialized veterinary care, kind attention, and socialization they need to thrive — only because of YOUR generous donations. Thank you for being a champion for animals and for giving generously today!


A Home for the Holidays: Brian and Glade

Mentoring Leads to Bonding

At the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), we see many cats and kittens that are under-socialized and need constant interaction to replace fear with trust. More often than not these interactions are done by humans, but sometimes all it takes is the mentoring of another feline to turn these under-socialized cats around.

Life of Brian

Brian and his sister came to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center through the organization’s Community Cat Initiative in early December. At about 11-weeks, he and his sibling fit the definition of under-socialized to a tee. They hissed, spit, displayed defensive body language, and did not want to be handled. The kittens spent some time in foster care for some extra attention, and when they returned Brian’s sibling was socialized and quickly adopted, but unfortunately he was still standoffish.

Glade the Mentor

With Brian’s behavior still needing some adjusting, his mentor came in the form of Glade, a one-and-a-half-year-old cat. Glade himself had displayed under-socialized behaviors, but over time had become “charming, social, playful, and comfortable.”

ARL staff put the two together, and while Brian initially hissed at Glade, after a few minutes the two cats were nose to nose and Brian was ready to learn.

Brian watched how Glade interacted with people, and when Brian would begin to get hissy, Glade would correct his behavior. Over the course of just one weekend, Brian went from under-socialized to purring with people and displaying his charming personality!

A Bonded Pair

The weekend experience bonded Brian and Glade, and staff recommended that they find their forever home together. Of course it didn’t take long, and we are thrilled to report that kitten and mentor have been adopted and spent the holidays together in their new home!

YOU Can Help Even More Animals Like Brian in 2018!

Animals at ARL receive the specialized veterinary care, kind attention, and socialization they need to thrive — only because of YOUR generous donations. We receive no government funding and rely solely on generous individuals like you to keep our important work going. Your tax-deductible donation will provide the critical resources necessary to help thousands of homeless animals, family pets, wildlife, and community most in need in 2018. Thank you for being a champion for animals and for giving generously today!


ARL Reflections: Looking Back at an Amazing 2017

Terrific Transformations!

Stray, abandoned, surrendered, rescued, law enforcement cases — Animals arrive at the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) a variety of ways, and when they come to us, they need an abundance of care, support, and love — but some need more than others. It’s astounding to chart the progress of some of these animals, and when you can see a marked improvement, it’s proof-positive that ARL is truly a Champion for Animals.

Pictures say a thousand words, so WATCH these transformations unfold before your eyes!TransformationVid_Play

 

 

 

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Maybelle, May, 2017. Maybelle, a one-year-old pot-bellied pig was in the care of ARL for more than six months. What began as a tale of woe, turned into a tale of triumph!

 

 

eleanor blog thumbEleanor, May 2017. Eleanor, an 11-year-old Lhasa Apso mix, is lucky to be alive. Found wandering along with side of a busy road, Eleanor’s turn-around was awe-inspiring and emotional.

 

 

Phil ThumbPhil, February 2017. Phil, a two-year-old Maltese, was discovered abandoned along the side of the road in Hingham. He was an instant media sensation, and his transformation broke the cuteness scale!

 

 

Zim is ready to go to his forever home!

Zim, February 2017. Zim, an 11-month-old tabby classic, went from a stray, to a rescue, to a surgical patient, to adopted! His transformation was all about improving his quality of life.

 

 

sal blog 500x500Sal, May 2017. In his one year of life, Sal had endured quite a lot. Suffering a series of traumas, Sal needed a lot of TLC but in the end he found his perfect forever home.

 

Let’s Help Even More Animals in 2018 — Together!

The above stories are just a tiny sample-size of the work that ARL is doing every day. Animals at ARL receive the specialized veterinary care, kind attention, and socialization they need to thrive — only because of YOUR generous donations. ARL receives no government funding, relying solely on the generosity of individuals like you to keep our important work going. We need your continued support today to ensure we start the new year fully-funded to respond to the nearly 18,000 animals who will depend on us for help. Your tax-deductible donation will provide the critical resources necessary to help thousands of homeless animals, family pets, wildlife, and communities most in need in 2018.

Thank you for being a Champion for Animals and for giving generously today!


A Home for the Holidays: Meet Matty!

Energetic 10-Year-Old Podengo Portugueso Pequeno Waiting for His Forever Home

Matty came to the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center from another shelter in October, and while he has garnered interest with his stunning looks and energetic personality, nearly two months later he’s still awaiting his new family.

A Dedham staff favorite, Matty is the best of both worlds — he loves his outdoor time and long walks, but is just as happy to curl up and cuddle. And when it comes to petting, Matty will actually stare at you until you pet him! Click here to see Matty in action!

Behavioral Challenges

The 10-year-old Podengo Portugueso Pequeno was surrendered for displaying stressing behaviors around small children when his personal space was invaded — a common issue for some dogs. He also has a tendency to chase small animals and cats, and will bark at strangers entering the home or yard.

Matty is however housetrained, and knows basic commands.

With all these behavioral factors, Matty would prefer to be in an adult home without children, and be the king of the castle i.e. no other pets in the home!

Why Matty Needs a Home for the Holidays

Even with regular human socialization, the shelter environment can increase stress levels and even cause an animal to become depressed. While ARL’s dedicated staff and volunteers make sure that each individual animal gets the love, support and attention they need, what Matty really needs is a home to call his own.

Animals Depend on Us — and We Depend on You!

The greatest gift for Matty this holiday season is a forever home, and if you can’t provide a home for him, you can always support ARL to allow us to continue to care for animals like Matty. ARL receives no government funding, relying solely on the generosity of individuals like you to keep our important work going. We need your continued support today to ensure we start the new year fully-funded to respond to the nearly 18,000 animals who will depend on us for help. Your tax-deductible donation will provide the critical resources necessary to help thousands of homeless animals, family pets, wildlife, and communities most in need in 2018.

Thank you for being a Champion for Animals and for giving generously today!


Kittens with Rare Congenital Condition Looking for Purrfect Family

Special Kittens Require Special Accommodations

Fifteen-week-old Baxter and Suzie recently came to the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) as owner surrenders and are like typical kittens in many ways. They’re energetic, spunky, and are just starting to learn their way in the world. However these siblings are also unlike many other kittens, as they were born with a rare congenital defect that prohibits normal ambulation; and will need to be adopted into homes able to accommodate their limitations.

Radial Agenesis is an orthopedic condition were the radius — the bone that goes from our elbow to our wrist — did not form properly. These kittens are essentially missing bones in their front limbs, as well as one hind leg. The condition results in bowed-in front legs, where the kittens walk on their wrists instead of their paws. Click here to see video of these siblings in action!

While little can be done to correct this condition, many cats, including Baxter and Suzie, with Radial Agenesis can have an excellent quality of life and have no idea that they are not “normal”. Potential adopters will have to keep the following accommodations in mind:

  •         Carpeted Floors. For Baxter and Suzie, carpets give them the necessary traction to get around — especially stairs.
  •         Easily Accessible Basics. Providing food and water dishes that don’t tip over and a litter box with a lowered opening are key.
  •         Indoor only. Baxter and Suzie should be indoor animals only, as they lack the ability to quickly flee from outdoor dangers.
  •         Weight Management. Because of their abnormal gait, there is a greater risk of developing osteoarthritis later in life. Keeping them at a healthy weight along with regular veterinary visits is recommended.

A Home for the Holidays

Suzie and Baxter have done well in separate foster homes, and will soon be ready to find their forever home so stay tuned! If you are ready to open up your heart and home for an animal in need this holiday season, please check ARL’s adoption page to find your perfect match or visit our Boston, Dedham, or Brewster Animal Care and Adoption Centers to meet your next furry friend in person.


A Home for the Holidays: Meet Ellen

Special Needs Puppy Looking for Her Forever Home

UPDATE: Adopted!

Ellen, a beautiful four-month-old Feist-mix, came to the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) as part of a transport from our partners in North Carolina in November.

A few days after arriving at ARL’s Brewster Animal Care and Adoption Center, Ellen suffered a seizure, and has since shown mild neurologic symptoms including a spastic nature to her gait while playing and a lack of coordination.

Preliminary exams and diagnostic tests have not pinpointed the root cause of the seizure or the ongoing issues that have followed.

It should be noted that while exhibiting neurological symptoms, Ellen is also displaying typical puppy behaviors. She’s energetic, loves attention and playtime, and is absolutely adorable! To see Ellen being playful click here.

Needing Extra Care

Adopting a puppy is an extraordinary commitment, but in Ellen’s case she may need more than learning manners, house training, and everything else puppies need to become well-adjusted adult dogs.

“There is a fair chance that her symptoms are caused by hydrocephalus, a congenital defect in which excess fluid accumulates around the brain,” said Dr. Erin Doyle, Lead Veterinarian for ARL Shelter Veterinary Services. “The prognosis for hydrocephalus is very dependent on its severity. In some cases, hydrocephalus can be treated surgically or managed medically to control symptoms. Ellen’s lack of any further seizures and the mild nature of her ongoing symptoms are positive indicators, but unfortunately do not guarantee a good long term prognosis.”

The best way to determine her diagnosis and prognosis would be through a referral to a veterinary neurologist and an MRI. An MRI can run $1,500-3,000, however, whether this is necessary will be determined by Ellen’s ongoing symptoms. Ellen’s new family will have to monitor her closely and establish a plan with their regular veterinarian to determine the best course of treatment.

Have Some Love to Give?

Ellen is waiting for her forever family, and so are many others. If opening your heart and home to an animal in need this holiday season is up your alley, we encourage you to visit ARL’s Boston, Dedham or Brewster Animal Care and Adoption Centers to find your perfect match!


Update: Maybelle Finds a Forever Home

A Six-Month Heroic Journey Comes to an End

Since early May, the journey of Maybelle, a one-year-old obese pot-bellied pig, has been chronicled by local and national media, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) collective staff and volunteers, and even by everyday visitors to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center. Maybelle’s final chapter has unfolded, and we are happy to report that our famous girl has been adopted!

A West Bridgewater couple saw Maybelle on the news recently, and thought they could give her a loving and happy home.

“We had a pig before for 20 years, so we know what we’re getting into,” said Gail Pepe. “We wanted to help her because we know she was abused. We have a spot for her and (even) built her a house.”

The couple brought Maybelle to her new home this past weekend, and along with constructing an enclosure to suit Maybelle’s needs, they have also consulted with their veterinarian to ensure that she will continue to make progress.

Everyone at ARL is thrilled that Maybelle is getting the second chance she deserves!

Maybelle’s Weight-Loss Journey

Maybelle came to ARL weighing roughly 200 pounds, after allegedly being given a poor diet and kept indoors for her first year of life. She was depressed, immobile, uncomfortable, and unhealthy. While in the care of ARL, six small meals a day led to Maybelle losing approximately 25 pounds, and she slowly regained the ability to move around freely. She also became more outgoing and responsive to human interaction.

To follow Maybelle’s complete journey, click the links below:

ARL in Action

Maybelle’s case involved a number of ARL programs including: Law Enforcement Services, Rescue Services, Shelter Veterinary Medicine, and plenty of support from shelter staff and volunteers. ARL receives no government funding, and relies solely on the generosity of individuals to fulfill our mission and vision. YOU make our work possible, and Maybelle is a shining example of what makes ARL a CHAMPION FOR ANIMALS. Please consider lending your support today!


UPDATE: Cats Rescued From Hoarding Situation Progressing

Extraordinary Measures Taken by ARL Volunteers and Staff

In late August, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) rescued nearly 50 cats from a hoarding situation in Bristol County. Many of these animals were in rough shape, and more than three dozen tested positive for a fungal infection that is transferable to other animals and humans as well. Extraordinary measures had to be taken to rehabilitate these cats, while keeping our staff, volunteers, and other animals safe from infection.

For the past seven weeks, the cats have been given daily medication, weekly cultures, and donning Tyvek suits and other protective gear, a dedicated group of volunteers bath the cats with pure oxygen twice a week. Additionally, while bathing the cats, our amazing volunteers also play with the kitties, improving their social skills and helping their true personalities come out. Most of the cats have shown to be very outgoing and regularly solicit attention.

Treating these cats has been an expensive endeavor and has presented logistical challenges as well.

“We decided with the number of cats to actually shut down an entire room in our holding area to treat these animals,” said Jessica Wright, ARL Veterinary Technician. “It wasn’t a decision that was made lightly because it impacts the rest of our shelter operations.”

A number of these cats have already found forever homes, and more are expected to be medically cleared and available for adoption soon. It’s truly been a group effort, and these animals have come a long way in the past month and a half. Click here to see a special report by WFXT in Boston on these ongoing efforts.

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Jazzy (L) was recently cleared medically and has found her forever home, while Baby Butch (R) is currently available!

“It’s really satisfying to see how different they look,” said Jane Urban, an ARL volunteer. “At the end of the day, these cats are going to good homes, so it’s extremely rewarding.”

Get Involved

ARL volunteers are special, and with nearly 550 individuals donating their time to help animals in need, they are the oil that keeps the ARL engine running. There are constantly volunteer opportunities available, please check our website often to get involved!


Thank You Thursday: From Stray, to Surgery, to Adopted!

ARL’s Cape Cod Branch Gets Helping Hand from Veterinary Partner

In late August, “Gus” was transferred to the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Brewster Animal Care and Adoption Center from Friends of Carver Animals. It’s estimated that Gus had been dumped into a feral colony about 10 years ago, and when he was recently trapped and neutered, because he was so friendly, it was decided he should be placed into a loving home, not returned to the colony.

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Gus following cleft palate repair.

When examined by ARL veterinary staff, it was noted that Gus had a cleft palate that was likely the result of an old injury rather than congenital, as well as a fractured upper canine tooth. A cleft palate for a cat can cause problems eating and swallowing, as well as respiratory complications.

 

Needing surgery, ARL teamed with Eastham Veterinary Hospital, with Dr. John Kelly performing the cleft palate repair, while extracting five teeth as well. Gus was returned to ARL to recover and was fed canned cat food diluted with water, and treated with antibiotics to prevent infection. Gus recovered quickly, and has since been adopted!

In one month, Gus went from a stray, to a rescue, to a patient, and finally to adopted! ARL wants to thank Eastham Veterinary Hospital for its partnership, and for giving Gus the chance to find a forever home.


Adopt a Shelter Dog Month: Why Adopt?

Special Study Highlights Why People Adopt Rescue Animals

It goes without saying, but we at the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) love each and every rescue animal that comes through our doors. But what motivates the general public to adopt shelter animals, and why would they recommend adoption to others? A recently published study sheds some light on those questions.

The survey study of 1,400 people was conducted by the Shelter Pet Project, an Ad Council public service advertising campaign promoting pet adoption; and was funded by Maddie’s Fund and ARL national partner the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS).

That face and a handshake, how could you say no? Apollo was adopted this past spring.

That face and a handshake, how could you say no? Apollo was adopted this past spring.

 

So what motivates an adopter?

  •         Adopting a rescue animal is the right thing to do. According to this study, adopters feel good about saving a life and finding a companion in the process. A number of respondents also said adopting a rescue animal “saved them.”
  •         Joining a special group. One-third of respondents loved the idea of joining the passionate and special community of shelter-pet adopters.
  •         Great experience. This is something we hear a lot of at ARL. Survey respondents felt the adoption process was smooth, things were organized, and staff was knowledgeable. One-third said the process was fun!

Recommending adoption to others

  •         71 percent of respondents passionately recommend shelter/rescue animals — compared to 41 percent of those acquiring an animal from a breeder, and 21 percent acquiring from a pet store.
  •         Respondents felt adoption evokes a strong sense of pride, kindness and social responsibility to a degree not displayed among the breeder and pet store segments.

The complete study can be read here.

Saving Lives

When you adopt, you are giving your new companion a second chance, and are saving two lives — the animal you adopt, and the one that takes its place in our shelter. Create your own success story and visit ARL’s Boston, Brewster, or Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Centers today!