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Category: Boston
Home for the Holidays: Maya’s Story

8-Year-Old Chihuahua Finds Forever Home Following Life-Saving Surgery

Maya, an adorable 8-year-old Chihuahua, came to the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) in early October as an owner surrender. Like many animals who come to ARL, she was shy and fearful of strangers and other dogs.

Additionally, Maya had underlying medical issues – including a mammary mass (which was benign), and an extraordinarily large bladder stone that, if gone untreated, could’ve been life-threatening.

Bladder stones are a build-up of minerals and other materials and common symptoms include:

  • Urinary accidents
  • Frequents attempts to urinate without success
  • Straining to urinate
  • Discolored or bloody urine

Maya was showing classic symptoms of bladder stones, and ARL Shelter Medicine staff were shocked at the size of the stone which was clearly seen in her x-rays. While antibiotics and a therapeutic diet are sometimes used to help dissolve the stone over time, a surgical approach was necessary in Maya’s case.

The 10-pound sweetheart made it through surgery with flying colors, recovered quickly and was soon made available for adoption.

It took longer than expected given her cuteness factor, but 26 days after Maya’s surgery, she found her perfect match!

As we get into the heart of the holiday season, Maya has found her Home for the Holidays, and this is a gift we wish we could give every animal at ARL’s Animal Care and Adoption Centers this holiday season.

Ready to Adopt?

If adding a furry member to your family is on your to-do list for the holidays, stop into ARL’s Animal Care and Adoption Centers — located in Boston, Dedham, and Brewster to speak with an Animal Care Associate. With ARL’s Adoption Forward philosophy, the conversation-based, application-free process aims to match you with the perfect animal to suit your lifestyle and your family. Visit us today!


Press Release: Pair of Six-Month-Old Cats Abandoned on Busy Dedham Street

Cats Left in Cardboard Box, One Suffering Broken Leg

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is currently caring for a pair of six-month-old cats who were left in a cardboard box along High St., a busy thoroughfare in Dedham, MA. One of the cats is suffering from a broken leg and ARL Law Enforcement is seeking information to find the person responsible for this cruel act.

While driving along High St. this past weekend, a Good Samaritan witnessed a man standing in front of a box along High St., and drove away when the driver pulled over. Stunned to find the cats in the box, the Good Samaritan brought the cats to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center, along with the contents of the box. There was pertinent information inside the box which ARL Law Enforcement is following up on.

The man was driving a dark-colored SUV, and is described as a white male in his 30’s or 40’s.

The cats, named Arnold and Helga, are not microchipped, and both are extremely friendly. Along with an injured leg, a rabbit nail was found embedded into Helga’s tail – both cats were dirty but overall in good health.

As the law enforcement investigation continues, the cats will continue to be monitored and undergo medical treatment — the goal is to have them both into new, loving homes for the holidays.

ARL Law Enforcement is the lead agency in this investigation, and anyone with information is urged to contact ARL Law Enforcement (cruelty@arlboston.org; (617) 426-9170).


Abandoned Beverly Dog Taken in by Couple Who Found Him

Angel thriving with his new family

In late September, Angel, a small, partially blind and deaf terrier-type dog was found in appalling condition and wandering the streets of Beverly, MA. A heart-warming example of the human-animal bond, the couple who took Angel off the streets has now taken him into their home.

The meeting between Angel and his finders was fate. Returning from an evening run, Beverly residents Dan Boschen and Liz Sweetman saw Angel ambling around the intersection of Charnock and Prospect Streets, and aside from his filthy appearance, it was clear he needed help.

“I’ve never seen a dog in such bad shape, and he was hobbling down the street towards a busier street,” said Boschen. “We were able to corner him and pick him up.”

From there, Angel was brought to a nearby veterinary clinic where he received emergency treatment. He was severely matted (a pound of fur was removed), emaciated and overgrown and curled nails were causing him pain and discomfort when walking.

While at the veterinary clinic, Boschen and Sweetman, who had only recently brought a second dog into their home, came to a realization.

“He was so sad, like his whole life was pain,” Sweetman said. “Once we got into a room with him they didn’t know if he would make it and we said we’ll do whatever we can. We looked at each other and knew we wanted to take him if he was going to be alright.”

From Beverly, the 10-year-old Angel was put into the care of the Animal Rescue League of Boston where his medical care continued and a joint investigation between Beverly Police and ARL Law Enforcement ensued.

Slowly but steadily Angel made progress and Boschen and Sweetman were able to take him into their home for foster care after several weeks. With medical care, proper diet, shelter and love, Angel, now appropriately named Lucky, is now thriving with his new family and will be enjoying his new home for the holidays.

While ecstatic that Angel has found a new home, unfortunately law enforcement officials have been unable to discover who left this animal to fend for himself on the streets. ARL continues to be an assisting agency to the Beverly Police Department and anyone with information can contact Beverly Animal Control (mlipinski@beverlyma.gov; (978) 605-2361), or ARL Law Enforcement (cruelty@arlboston.org; (617) 426-9170).

For Giving Tuesday Double Your Impact

#GivingTuesday is an International movement created to encourage giving back to charity during the busy holiday season. For this special day, ARL’s Board of Directors, past Board members, and President have teamed up to offer an incredible challenge: Raise $100,000 and they will match it*! That means your donation from now until November 27 will go twice as far to help animals in need!

*The match only applies to the first $100K in donations ARL receives but all gifts will go to help animals in need

 


Community Cats Sometimes Need Extra Care

How YOU can help community cats like “Sherman”

In the spring of 2017, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) launched its Community Cat Initiative, in an effort to help the estimated 700,000 community cats living in cities and towns across Massachusetts. Since its creation, the initiative has served hundreds of these animals, with nearly 80 percent finding forever homes. These cats all have a story, and many share a common affliction: the need for extended care.

Sherman, a five-year-old domestic shorthair cat, was found wandering the streets of Mattapan in early July. Quirky but friendly, he was brought to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center where he underwent a thorough veterinary examination.

Due to a wound of unknown origin (WUO), Sherman was placed into a state-mandated four-month quarantine. Additionally, Sherman needed to be neutered and required extensive dental work, including two extractions.

Sherman after his dental work. Many community cats suffer from the pain of dental disease and need extensive care in this regard.

While only a small fraction of community cats need to enter quarantine protocol, the vast majority are intact and many suffer the pains of advanced dental disease and/or cracked or broken teeth as a result of living on the streets.

“Dental disease is certainly something we see on a regular basis with community cats,” said ARL Community and Shelter Veterinarian Dr. Kate Gollon. “Additionally given the living conditions and possible run-ins with other cats or predators, cracked or broken teeth are common as well. It’s painful and if untreated can lead to other health issues.”

These issues can include jaw fractures, and organ damage caused by chronic bacterial infection – kidneys are particularly susceptible.

The care given to Sherman and community cats like him is extraordinary, far-reaching, and exemplifies ARL’s mission to be an unwavering champion for animals in need, committed to keeping them safe and healthy in habitats and homes.

This commitment however, is not without cost.

For Sherman, who will soon be available for adoption, his four-month quarantine stay in Dedham, neuter surgery and dental work translates to approximately $2,500.

The Community Cat Initiative is an exciting branch on ARL’s community services tree, but in order to provide these innovative services and help upwards of 1,500 cats live healthier lives, ARL must raise $204,000 annually to do so.

For Giving Tuesday Double Your Impact

#GivingTuesday is an International movement created to encourage giving back to charity during the busy holiday season. For this special day, ARL’s Board of Directors, past Board members, and President have teamed up to offer an incredible challenge: Raise $100,000 and they will match it*! That means your donation from now until November 27 will go twice as far to help animals in need!

*The match only applies to the first $100K in donations ARL receives but all gifts will go to help animals in need


DONATE NOW to DOUBLE your impact for animals

#GivingTuesday is an international movement created to encourage giving back to the charities nearest and dearest to your heart during the busy holiday season.

Being a Champion for Animals means being a resource for not only animals in need, but also for the people who care for them. Because ARL is an essential resource in this regard, ARL’s Board of Directors, Past Board Members, and President have teamed up to offer this incredible challenge:

Raise $100,000 and they will match it*

That means your donation now through November 27 will go twice as far to help animals in need!

Donate $100 or more and you (or your pet!) can be included on ARL’s #GivingTuesday Wall of Honor!

Want to see and hear about YOUR donations in action? Tune into Facebook!

Throughout #GivingTuesday, you’ll hear firsthand from ARL staff, volunteers and a few of our biggest supporters how YOUR donations make it possible to help more than 18,000 animals each year. Be sure to log onto ARL’s Facebook page on #GivingTuesday as we host a variety of interviews showcasing the incredible work YOU make possible and the animals who directly benefit.

If you missed our live interviews this week, you can view them anytime on ARL’s Facebook page under the “videos” section, or click on the links below:

THANK YOU to ARL’s President and Board of Directors for offering this amazing challenge!

Sierra H. Bright
Barbara Burg and Priscilla Golding
Lisa and Dave Cawley
Randi Cohen and Al Ossorio
Anonymous
Richard and Lois Hall
Jeff Kaplan
Richard Kelly and Carol Akerson
Dr. Holly L. Kelsey
Walter and Elizabeth Kenyon
Lee Ann and Michael Leahy
Neal Litvack
Jeffrey and Jane Marshall
Malcolm McDonald and Susan Passoni
Kelly and Brian McKernan
Mary Nee and James Chapin
Tara and Christophe Oliver
Alisa Plazonja
Drs. Astrid and Peter Rapoza
Malisa and Andrew Schuyler
Tim and Jen Sullivan
Jane Willis and Richard Davey
Quentin P. Faulkner

*The match only applies to the first $100K in donations ARL receives but all gifts will go to help animals in need


2018 Fall Educational Forum: ARL in the Community

Every autumn, members of the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Leadership Council gather in Dedham to get an up-close glimpse of what ARL programs are doing to help animals in need. This year was all about ARL’s community programs to bring services directly to those that need them most.

Proactive vs. Reactive

Animal adoption is of course a facet of ARL that’s widely recognized, however as the world of animal welfare continues to evolve, we must be proactive instead of reactive; with the goal of keeping animals safe and healthy in their homes, not in a shelter environment. To be proactive, we must move beyond the walls of our shelters and into the communities that are in need our services.

What are Community Programs?

  • Law Enforcement – Investigates crimes of animal cruelty, abuse and neglect. In 2017, ARL’s Law Enforcement Department investigated cases involving nearly 3,000 animals.
  • Rescue Services – ARL is the only animal welfare agency in Massachusetts with a technically-trained department dedicated to animal rescue. In 2017, Rescue Services assisted nearly 2,000 domesticated animals and wildlife in need.
  • Community Cat Initiative – Launched in 2017, this program addresses the estimated 700,000 community cats living in harsh conditions throughout Massachusetts. In its first year, the program assisted 622 community cats, 78 percent of which found loving homes, while the remaining cats were returned to the field where they are monitored and fed by members of the community.
  • Spay Waggin’ – Serving eight locations throughout the South Shore, South Coast and Cape Cod, this mobile spay and neuter clinic offers high-quality and low-cost services and in 2017 surpassed 50,000 surgeries since being launched in 2000.
  • Healthy Animals, Healthy Communities – This on-going pilot project was made possible through a grant from the Cummings Foundation, and centers on bringing services to the Codman Square area in Dorchester, MA. The initiative includes a weekly, low-cost wellness clinic, as well as a number of partnerships, including the Codman Academy.

Two New Additions

Attendees at this year’s Fall Forum were also introduced to two new exciting additions to ARL’s community programs that aim to bring services directly to areas they’re needed most.

Transport Waggin’

Thanks to a generous donation from Leadership Council members Peter and Connie Lacaillade, this specially-equipped vehicle allows ARL to help more animals in need by providing a missing resource – mobile response.

The Transport Waggin’ will be able to pick up surrendered animals from owners that are unable to come to the shelter; assist concerned citizens who find stray animals in their communities; assist Animal Control Agencies and smaller rescue groups with transport; assist ARL Law Enforcement and Rescue Services; and transport existing animals in our shelter system for any outside needs or services.

Wellness Waggin’

Although not on the road as of yet, the Wellness Waggin’ will drastically increase ARL’s ability to bring veterinary services to communities where they’re needed most.
The vehicle will include an exam room and surgical suite, and is slated to be in operation every Monday, Wednesday and Friday – each day in a different location in the Boston metropolitan area.

By bringing these vital and affordable veterinary services to communities, we can eliminate part of the financial burden of pet ownership, prevent animal surrender, and allow animals to remain in their homes.

A Special Thank You

ARL wishes to thank our Leadership Council members who attended the annual Fall Educational Forum, and stay tuned for more exciting updates of our expanding community programs and initiatives!


ARL Unveils New Transport Waggin’

Thousands of animals to benefit from mobile unit

With Animal Care and Adoption Centers in Boston, Dedham and Brewster, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) provides medical and behavioral care and adoption services for thousands of animals annually (over 18,000 in 2017), and these animals arrive at ARL in a number of ways. Owner surrenders, strays, out-of-state transports, rescues, and law enforcement cases; ARL also routinely assists local municipal and private shelters with transfers and we unfortunately also respond to large overcrowding and cruelty situations as well.

But no matter how they arrive, the goal for every animal is the same: that they are safe and healthy and returned to habitats and homes.

Each of ARL’s locations has different characteristics (urban vs. rural) and capabilities i.e. surgical suites and barns/paddocks for farm animals. Moving animals to the location that’s best suited for their needs has historically been a logistical challenge — until now.

With a most generous donation from Leadership Council members, Connie and Peter Lacaillade, ARL has purchased, outfitted and staffed a new Transport Waggin’.

Linking ARL’s locations, programs and resources, the Transport Waggin’ will serve animals and communities in a variety of ways including:

  • Ensuring proper medical care: If a shelter animal requires specialized diagnostics, surgery, or constant veterinary supervision, they have access to the care they need.
  • Matching animals with adopters more quickly: Animals may be overlooked by adopters in one Adoption Center base on their size, temperament or needs, so a change in location can be beneficial.
  • Enhancing behavior and enrichment: Different ARL Adoption Centers offer different volunteer expertise and amenities, like outdoor runs.
  • Allowing ARL to help out-of-state animals: ARL receives regular transports from high-kill areas of the country and Puerto Rico. These life-saving transports broaden ARL’s reach in helping animals in need, while meeting local adoption needs.
  • Increasing ARL’s ability to be a community resource: ARL can better assist municipal shelters, animal control facilities, and smaller rescue groups in transporting animals to get the care they need.

Abandoned Dogs Found with Striking Similarities

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) recently took in a small, terrier-type dog that was found abandoned in Beverly, MA. ARL’s Law Enforcement Department joined police in Beverly to ask the public to come forward with any information to ascertain where the dog (named Angel) may have come from. Shortly after that public plea, ARL was contacted by animal control in Brookline, MA and is now caring for a second abandoned dog, who bears a striking similarity and found around the same time as Angel.

“Chester” is an intact male, estimated to be about four-years-old, and was found in poor and neglectful condition. As with the case of Angel, this animal was not microchipped, and his fur was extremely matted and urine-soaked. The dog is also underweight and suffering from painful, advanced dental disease.

To see news coverage of Chester’s story, click here!

Chester’s entire coat has been shaved, and he has received a thorough veterinary exam at ARL’s Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center – he will continue to be monitored and will also be neutered. Although agitated upon intake, Chester’s demeanor has greatly improved, as he is now soliciting attention and accepting treats from staff.

Whether there is a connection between the two animals is currently unknown, however the timeframe, breed and conditions in which they were found are too similar to ignore. While the neither animal is currently available for adoption, the dogs are moving in that direction as they continue to make positive progress.

ARL Law Enforcement is again urging anyone with information regarding either of these animals to come forward – any information can be directed ARL Law Enforcement at (617) 426-9170, or email cruelty@arlboston.org.


Press Release: Law Enforcement Seeking Public’s Help in Identifying Abandoned Dog’s Owner

This past week a small, terrier-type dog was found in appalling condition and wandering the streets of Beverly, MA. Now, the Beverly Police Department and the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s Law Enforcement Department are asking for the public’s help in finding the dog’s former owner/caretaker.

The 10-year-old male dog, named Angel, was found at the intersection of Charnock and Prospect St. and was severely matted, dirty, underweight, and malnourished. Additionally, extremely overgrown and curled nails were causing the dog pain and discomfort when walking.

See media coverage of Angel’s story here!

While neutered, the dog is not microchipped, making the public’s help critical to helping law enforcement find who was responsible for the dog not only being on the streets, but also being in such poor and neglectful condition.

Angel was initially in the care of a local veterinarian in Peabody, but is now with ARL where he will continue to receive the care he needs to improve. While skittish and possibly deaf, Angel is extremely friendly and has already gained a couple of pounds!

ARL is also an assisting agency in this investigation, and anyone with information can contact Beverly Animal Control (mlipinski@beverlyma.gov; (978) 605-2361), or ARL Law Enforcement (cruelty@arlboston.org; (617) 426-9170).


Too Many Animals Being Abandoned Outside Shelters

ARL teams with Quincy Animal Control to urge proper pet surrender

This week the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) joined with Quincy Animal Control to issue a public reminder that if you need to surrender an animal, to please do so properly – this after four rabbits were found abandoned in a carrier outside the Quincy Animal Shelter. The rabbits are now in the care of ARL and will soon be made available for adoption.

To see media coverage of this story click here!

Over the past few months there have been several instances involving animals being left outside of shelters or animal control facilities, ARL included – not only is this irresponsible, it’s also against the law.

One of four rabbits recently abandoned outside the Quincy Animal Shelter. They are in the care of ARL and will be available for adoption soon.

Abandoning an animal in Massachusetts is a felony, and each instance is thoroughly investigated by law enforcement.

Pet surrender isn’t easy. We understand that some pet owners feel guilt, shame, embarrassment, fear judgement or condemnation for surrendering an animal – and choose abandonment instead. This is never a viable option.

When surrendering an animal, it’s critical to meet with someone face-to-face. ARL is committed to keeping animals safe and healthy in their homes, and are willing to explore every option to see if there’s a way to keep the animal with the owner and out of the shelter. When you surrender properly, you’re also helping shelter and medical staff better understand the animal and what they may need before being rehomed.

Organizations like ARL exist to help animals, as well as the people who care for them. Moving, financial struggles; pet surrender is sometimes necessary, and ARL’s intake staff is ready to guide you through the process. If you need to surrender an animal, please make that phone call today.