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Category: Brewster
The ARL Welcomes Nadine Pellegrini

Former Assistant U.S. Attorney to serve as ARL’s new director of advocacy

Please join us in welcoming aboard Nadine Pellegrini, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s very first director of advocacy! In her new role, Nadine will provide leadership and direction on our organization’s advocacy agenda.

A Natick-resident, Nadine is an animal lover who has two pet dogs and a horse. Her passion for animal welfare rounds out the many talents she brings to the ARL.

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“I’m honored to join an organization that does so much to support the health and safety of animals in our community,” says Nadine Pellegrini, ARL’s director of advocacy.

“I’m honored to join an organization that does so much to support the health and safety of animals in our community,” says Nadine. “The opportunity to help advance laws and programs that prevent cruelty, neglect, and abuse is especially meaningful to me professionally and personally.”

Nadine worked on a variety of cases during her 20 years with the U.S. Attorney’s office in Boston. Most recently, she was a member of the U.S. Attorney’s anti-terrorism unit and on the prosecution team for United States vs. Dzhokar Tsarnaev.

She also served as chief of the major crimes unit, prosecuting cases involving enforcement of the Endangered Species Act, Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and more.

After receiving her law degree from Albany Law School of Union University, a keen interest in animal protection led Nadine to pursue a master of science degree in animals and public policy from the Tufts Center for Animals and Public Policy (CAPP) at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.

Nadine also taught animal law at Boston College Law School and given lectures on federal wildlife protection at CAPP.

Nadine’s extensive knowledge of law enforcement and experience prosecuting crimes will help immenselyas the ARL moves legislation and policy discussion forward to improve the protection and treatment of animals in Massachusetts,” explains Mary Nee, president of the ARL.

Please help us give a warm welcome to Nadine Pellegrini, ARL’s first director of advocacy!


Happening Now: ARL Hosts Free Spay-Neuter-A-Thon

ARL spays/neuters 52 Cape Cod animals in need on World Spay Day

Early this morning, ARL’s Spay Waggin’ pulled into Falmouth, MA to host it’s very first Free Hip to Snip Free Spay-Neuter-A-Thon on the 22nd annual World Spay Day.

The last Tuesday of every February, National World Spay Day shines a spotlight on the power of affordable, accessible spay/neuter to prevent pet overpopulation.

Thanks to a generous grant from Cold Noses Foundation, the ARL’s Spay Waggin’ is providing free spay and neuter services to animals in need on Cape Cod. The mobile surgical unit will be stationed outside of the Petco in Falmouth today and tomorrow.

Dr. Kyle Quigley, lead veterinarian at the ARL, helped spay and neuter over xxx animals on the Spay Waggin' in 2015!

DID YOU KNOW… that the ARL’s Spay Waggin’ provides high-quality, affordable spay and neuter services to cats and dogs on Cape Cod and the South Shore? Dr. Kyle Quigley, lead veterinarian at the ARL, spayed and neutered over 260 animals on the Cape in 2015!

During the event, Dr. Kyle Quigley, lead veterinarian for community veterinary services at the ARL, will welcome a total of 52 cat and dog patients aboard the Spay Waggin’.

“Spaying or neutering your cat or dog offers very important health benefits, yet finding affordable options can pose a challenge for many pet owners on Cape Cod,” says Dr. Quigley.

He explains that one of the ARL’s goals for the Hip to Snip Free Spay-Neuter-A-Thon is to help Cape Cod residents looking for an affordable option to learn more about the exceptional care pets receive on the Spay Waggin’.

In 2016, the Spay Waggin’ will visit Cape Cod on the third Tuesday of every month. Visits will rotate between Petco in Falmouth and The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) in Yarmouth. To view the schedule, visit arlboston.org/spay-waggin.

ONLY YOU CAN MAKE THIS WORK POSSIBLE!

The Ellen B. Gray Memorial Fund has challenged us to turn a generous $5,000 donation into $20,000 before the end of February to bring spay and neuter services to more animals in need!

All funds donated during the It’s Hip to Snip Fund Drive now through February 29 will benefit the ARL’s community spay and neuter programs including the Spay Waggin’.

The ARL receives no government or public funding to provide spay and neuter services to animals in need  — ONLY YOU can make this important work possible!

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VERY SPECIAL THANKS to our challenge donor, The Ellen B. Gray Memorial Fund; Da Vinci Ristorante; our media sponsors and partners Friends of Jake and Liam, WBZ, WEEI, WRKO, WZLX, 98.5 The Sports Hub, and WBOS; and everyone who made a donation to support ARL’s spay and neuter programs during the It’s Hip to Snip Fund Drive!

For more spay and neuter resources, visit arlboston.org/spay-neuter.


Debunked: Common Spay and Neuter Myths

ARL’s Dr. Schettino shares the awesome truth about spaying/neutering your pet

IT’S HIP TO SNIP! The ARL wants to break down barriers to getting pets spayed and neutered this February during National Spay/Neuter Awareness Month.

According to Dr. Schettino, vice president of animal welfare at the ARL, the cost of spay and neuter surgery is a major barrier for many pet owners. Spay and neuter surgery at a private veterinary clinic in Massachusetts can range up to several hundred dollars.

To bring affordable spay and neuter services to more animals in need, the Ellen B. Gray Memorial Fund has challenged us to raise $20,000 in just 14 days during the It’s Hip to Snip Fund Drive. All donations made during the fund drive will benefit the ARL’s community spay/neuter programs including the Spay Waggin,’ the ARL’s mobile surgical unit.

DONATE NOW to bring spay and neuter services to more animals in need.

Many misconceptions pet owners have about the low-risk surgery also stand in the way of increasing spay and neuter rates.

In a recent twitter chat, Dr. Schettino debunked the 7 most common spay/neuter myths:

Myth #1: I don’t want my male dog or cat to feel like “less of a male.”
Fact: Pets don’t have any concept of sexual identity or ego. Neutering will not change a pet’s basic personality.

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Sharing is caring! Click the photo to download our flyer to spread the word that “It’s Hip to Snip”.

Myth #2: I want my children/family to see my pets experience the miracle of birth.
Fact: Complications can and do occur during the birthing process. Teach children/family members that all life is precious and by spaying and neutering your pet, he/she will lead a healthier, longer life.

Myth #3: It’s better to have one litter before spaying a female pet.
Fact: This is false. Females who are spayed before their first heat are typically healthier.

Myth #4: My pet is a purebred and I should breed him/her.
Fact: Your pet may be a purebred, but so is at least one out of every four pets brought to animal shelters throughout the country. Purebreds and their offspring are no exception and be spayed and neutered as well.

Myth #5: My pet will get fat and lazy.
Fact: Pets get fat and lazy because their owners overfeed them and don’t provide enough exercise, not because they are spayed or neutered.

Myth #6: My dog (or cat) is so special. I want a puppy/kitten just like her/him.
Fact: Your pet’s puppies or kittens will not be a carbon copy of your pet.

Myth #7: It’s expensive to have my pet spayed
Fact: Many affordable options exist. Check out the ARL’s spay/neuter resources to find one in your area.

YOU MAKE THIS WORK POSSIBLE!  

The ARL receives no government or public funding to keep animals safe and healthy in their community — YOU make providing important veterinary care and preventing overpopulation possible!

DONATE NOW

AS A SPECIAL THANK YOU… DONATE $35 or more by midnight TODAY, February 19 and you will automatically be entered to win a matching leash and collar set from Bowchies*!

Click here or on the green button below to make a donation to the ARL’s It’s Hip to Snip Fund Drive!

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VERY SPECIAL THANKS to our challenge donor, The Ellen B. Gray Memorial Fund; Bowchies; our media sponsors and partners Friends of Jake and Liam, WBZ, WEEI, WRKO, WZLX, 98.5 The Sports Hub, and WBOS; and everyone who made a donation to support ARL’s spay and neuter programs during the It’s Hip to Snip Fund Drive!

For more spay and neuter resources, visit arlboston.org/spay-neuter.

*Click here for official rules.


Advocates Show Support at Farm Ballot Hearing Yesterday

ARL president Mary Nee joins other to push for House Bill 3930

Yesterday, more than 150 animal advocates and members of The Citizens for Farm Animal Protection Coalition gathered inside of the Massachusetts State House to attend a legislative hearing for House Bill 3930.

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More than 150 animal advocates and members of The Citizens for Farm Animal Protection Coalition gathered  inside the Massachusetts State House.

The bill would ensure that egg-laying hens, breeding pigs, and veal calves in Massachusetts would have enough room to turn around, lay down, and stretch their limbs. It would also ensure that shell eggs, and whole, uncooked cuts of pork and veal sold in our state are compliant with these modest standards.

At the February 11 hearing, ARL president Mary Nee joined other in voicing their support for HB 3930 in front of state officials and the Joint Committee on Environment, Natural Resources and Agriculture.

In her testimony, Mary urged committee members to take up the legislation because, “No animal should spend their entire life in distress without the basic freedoms to stand up, sit down and turn around.”

THE NEXT STEP…
The Committee has until early May to make a decision on legislation.  We will provide updates to our supporters on the decision as we receive them!

TAKE ACTION FOR ANIMALS!

Contact legislators on the committee and urge them to take action on House Bill 3930.


Extreme Cold Weather Warning In Effect

ARL and MEMA urge Massachusetts residents and their pets to stay indoors

Dangerously low temperatures are forecasted for this weekend!

The Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) is urging residents to take precautions during this period of extreme cold weather and stay indoors. Prolonged exposure to the cold can lead to serious health issues including frostbite and hypothermia.

MEMA urges residents to minimize outside activities and to follow the same precautions for their furry companions. If it’s too cold for you, it’s probably too cold for your pets.

Though they may have furry coats, animals are by no means immune to dangerously cold temperatures. Even rabbits, cats, and dogs that typically live outdoors need extra assistance keeping warm as temperatures drop to alarming lows.

The ARL offers 6 steps to keep animals safe during this cold weather warning:

  1. If possible, bring pets or feral cats that you’re familiar with indoors to a garage or basement.  If it’s not possible, click here to watch the ARL’s video on making a DIY cat shelter.
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    Keep community cats safe this winter by building your own DIY cat shelter in your yard. Click the photo for a basic how-to video.

  2. Bundle up your pup in a jacket or sweater during their walk, especially if their coat is made of hair (vs. fur). Take our quiz to determine if your pet needs a sweater.
  3. Before you start your engine, look under and pound on your vehicle’s hood to wake a napping cat trying to keep warm.
  4. Never leave your pet alone inside your vehicle, which won’t stay warm for long after your engine has turned off.
  5. Keep a winter pet emergency kit handy. Learn how to make your own simple and inexpensive DIY winter pet emergency kit.
  6. If your pet MUST remain outdoors, make sure that are in a winter-friendly shelter that has the following components: three-sided enclosure, stands off the ground, contains generous amounts of bedding, and plenty of (un-frozen!) drinking water. If possible, also make sure that the entrance faces away from heavy winds.

IF YOU SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING. If you’re concerned about a neighborhood animal outdoors in the cold this week, be sure to contact your local animal control office or authorities.

For more information about winter pet healthy and safety, visit arlboston.org/winter-pet-health.


Important Update from Mary Nee, ARL President

Dear friends,

I wanted to share some very sad news about Stitch, the young dog found starved and abandoned last week in Dedham.

As sometimes happens with cases of extreme malnutrition, Stitch was not responding well to re-feeding, a medically-guided process of providing nutrition after a period of deprivation.  To ensure he had no underlying conditions that might be interfering with re-feeding efforts, the ARL ordered extensive diagnostic tests.

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“Stitch closed out his short life with dignity, respect, and love — the way a dog should be treated.” Lt. Alan Borgal, director, ARL law enforcement team.

Late on Friday evening, the tests revealed that Stitch had a muscular condition affecting his ability to digest food and water called megaesophagus.

Several diseases can result in megaesophagus.  An animal can also be born with a defect that produces it.

Unfortunately, the results of further testing ruled out the more treatable causes of this condition in Stitch.

When he was unable to take water on his own any longer on Saturday, Stitch’s weakened state and the severity of this condition brought us to the point where the most humane decision was to put him to sleep.

As Lt. Alan Borgal, director of the ARL’s law enforcement team said very eloquently, “Stitch closed out his short life with dignity, respect, and love — the way a dog should be treated.”

While we are heartbroken he came to us too late to save, we are grateful to have been there to surround him with kindness and caring in his final days.

Thank you to everyone who kept Stitch in their thoughts this past week and for your continued concern for animals in need.

— Mary

SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING

Stitch’s case is an on-going investigation. If you have any information, contact Dedham animal control at (781) 751-9106.


It’s Hip to Snip – Spay or Neuter Your Pet!

February is National Spay/Neuter Awareness Month

During National Spay/Neuter Awareness Month this February, the ARL reminds the public that there’s nothing cool about pet overpopulation. So, pet owners, adjust those cool shades and help us spread the word that IT’S HIP TO SNIP!

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Marty the cat may look super cool in his bow tie but there’s nothing cool about pet overpopulation. Click his photo to learn more about ARL’s “It’s Hip to Snip” Campaign.

“There are too many cat and dogs in our communities that don’t have homes,” explains Dr. Edward Schettino, vice president of animal welfare at the ARL. “Every year, animal shelters like the ARL are inundated with stray and surrendered puppies and kittens that are the result of unplanned litters.”

In fact, national studies have found that amongst pet owners who indicate that their pets had at least one litter, 59% of cat owners and 38% of dog owners described the litter as “unintentional” or “accidental.”

Dr. Schettino believes that one reason that pet owners choose not to spay or neuter their pet is misconceptions about the low-risk surgery. “If we can increase spay and neuter rates, we can help prevent pet overpopulation,”

In addition to the benefits to the community, here are 5 more reasons why it’s hip to snip:

1. You Snip, You Save. The cost of caring for an unplanned litter of puppies or kittens far outweighs the cost of having a pet spayed or neutered. The good news – there are many affordable and free options in Massachusetts!

2. Snipping Reduces Spraying. Neutering resolves the vast majority of marking behaviors—even when a cat has a long-standing habit. Other nuisance behaviors such as howling in cats and excessive barking in dogs eases and even disappears after surgery.

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Sharing is caring! Click the photo to download our flyer to spread the word that “It’s Hip to Snip”.

3. Snipping Stops Scuffles. According to the National Canine Research Foundation, approximately 92% of fatal dog attacks involved male dogs, 94% of which were not neutered. Neutering male dogs and cats reduces their urge to roam and fight with other males.

4. Snipping Lengthens Life Span. The USA Today reports neutered male dogs live 18% longer than un-neutered males, and spayed females live 23% longer than unspayed females.

5. Snipping is a Safeguard. Neutering male cats and dogs before six months of age prevents testicular cancer. Spaying female cats and dogs before their first heat offers protection from uterine infections and breast cancer.

For more spay and neuter resources, visit arlboston.org/spay-neuter.

DID YOU KNOW… That more than a third of pet owners have not spayed or neutered their pet?

VERY SPECIAL THANKS to our It’s Hip to Snip media sponsors WBZ, WEEI, WRKO, WZLX, WBOS, and 98.5 The Sports Hub!


Update: Stitch Continues to Receive Intensive Care

ARL and the Dedham Police Department’s Animal Control Division thank public for support

HAVE TIPS AND INFORMATION? Contact Dedham Animal Control at (781) 751-9106.

Stitch, the dog abandoned in the cold earlier this week in Dedham, Massachusetts, continues to receive intensive care from the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL).

Dedham animal control officer Jayson Tracy discovered the extremely emaciated dog and immediately contacted the ARL for help.

“Stitch is getting extensive medical assistance,” explains Dr. Erin Doyle, the ARL’s lead veterinarian for shelter veterinary services. “He’s still very weak and we are monitoring his condition very closely.”

The ARL also continues to assist the Dedham Police Department’s Animal Control Division in following-up on information provided by the public.

Stitch is a dilute brindle pit-bull-type dog that had no collar on when he was found near the Bridge Street area of Dedham.  He is approximately 2 years of age.

We urge anyone with information about him to please contact Dedham animal control at (781) 751-9106.

IF YOU SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING….

Sadly, thousands of animals just like Stitch will suffer from abuse and neglect every year in Massachusetts. We all have a role to play in prevention and encourage urge the public to contact their local animal control officers anytime they suspect animal cruelty.

On behalf of everyone at the ARL, THANK YOU for the outpouring of support and information about Stitch.

DO YOU RECOGNIZE STITCH?  Please contact Dedham Animal Control at (781) 751-9106.

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Cold Weather Warning: Bring Your Pets Indoors

The ARL asks pet owners to please bring their animals inside, when possible

Our local weathermen issued a cold weather warning: bundle up this week!

A wave of frigid air hit New England, causing temperatures to plummet 10 to 15 degrees Fahrenheit below normal around The Greater Boston Area. Overnight temps are expected to drop into the teens and single digits in some of the northern and western suburbs.

Just as you’ll protect yourself with a warm coat, hat, and gloves when you head outdoors, your pets will need the extra protection too! Though they may have furry coats, animals are by no means immune to dangerously cold temperatures. Even rabbits, cats, and dogs that typically live outdoors need extra assistance keeping warm as temperatures drop to alarming lows.

5 steps to keep animals safe during this cold weather warning:

  1. If possible, bring pets or feral cats that you’re familiar with indoors to a garage or basement.
    cold weather warning

    Keep community cats safe this winter by building your own DYI cat shelter in your yard. Click the photo for a basic how-to video.

  2. Bundle up your pup in a jacket or sweater during their walk, especially if their coat is made of hair (vs. fur)
  3. Before you start your engine, look under and pound on your vehicle’s hood to wake a napping cat trying to keep warm.
  4. Never leave your pet alone inside your vehicle, which won’t stay warm for long after your engine has turned off.
  5. If your pet MUST remain outdoors, make sure that are in a winter-friendly shelter that has the following components: three-sided enclosure, stands off the ground, contains generous amounts of bedding, and plenty of (un-frozen!) drinking water.

IF YOU SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING. If you’re concerned about a neighborhood animal outdoors in the cold this week, be sure to contact your local animal control office or authorities.

For more information about winter pet healthy and safety, visit arlboston.org/winter-pet-health.


Top 7 ARL Animal Rescues of 2015

ARL’s rescue services team celebrates their favorite happy tail moments from this year – all made possible thanks to supporters like you! DONATE NOW

DID YOU KNOW… that the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is the only animal welfare organization in Massachusetts that has a technically-trained team dedicated to rescuing animals from a variety of emergency situations?

So far in 2015, ARL’s rescue services team has assisted 1,788 domesticated animals and wildlife that were trapped, displaced, injured or otherwise distressed. Click here to watch ARL’s rescue services team in action, as seen on Boston.com

The team is only there to answer the call for help because of donors like you!

THE CLOCK IS TICKING… and we still need to raise just over $592,000 by MIDNIGHT ON DECEMBER 31 to keep this important work going!

The ARL counts down our top 7 animal rescues from 2015:

ARL's rescue services team#7 – Canton deer pushed to safety

In March, a deer in Canton, MA went for a dip in a neighbor’s in-ground pool. Unfortunately for him, the concrete pool was empty and too deep for him to climb out of on his own.

Cue ARL’s resourceful rescue services team and facilities director who constructed a special ramp that allowed them to push the deer out of the pool uninjured!


 

ARL's rescue services team#6 – It’s all upstream for the Gloucester Beaver Family

In May, three beavers were found stuck in a dry spillway off Dikes Pond in Gloucester, MA. The walls of the spillway were anywhere from 5 to 8 feet high, which was just too steep of an incline for the beavers to scale safely.

Three members of ARL’s rescue services team armed with catch poles and large nets successfully captured the beaver family. They then carried them a quarter of a mile downstream to release them in Lily Pond unharmed!


 

ARL's rescue services team#5 – Lancaster goats are on the run no more

In January, the ARL was called in to capture a pair of goats that had been wandering along busy Route 190 between Sterling and Lancaster, MA. The two goats had reportedly been on the loose for up to 6 months and had become somewhat feral.

Thanks to their specially designed ungulate trap, ARL’s rescue services team was able to carefully capture both goats in the same trap. The duo was transported to ARL’s Dedham shelter where they were eventually adopted!


 

ARL's rescue services team#4 – Lowell goat finds shelter before the big snowstorm

In January, an elusive goat wandering around the greater Lowell, MA area for over a month had a fortunate intervention. The “Lowell goat”, as he became known, had been spotted trekking through the snow and was inching dangerously closer and closer to I-495.

With the hope of bringing the shaggy two-horned rambler to safety before an impending major snowstorm, ARL’s rescue services team set up a humane trap. They were in luck! The goat was transported to ARL’s Dedham shelter barn for proper food, water, and rest in a fresh bed of straw. After regaining his strength, he was transferred to a sanctuary in Central Massachusetts and given the name Braveheart. Click here to read the full rescue story.


 

ARL's rescue services team#3 – Boxer escapes an icy situation in West Roxbury

In March, a happy-go-lucky family dog was overcome with spring fever and decided to wade into a stream along the outskirts of Millennium Park in West Roxbury, MA. Deciding the water was a bit too chilly for his liking, the Boxer turned back for shore, only to find an icy shelf blocking his path.

Working alongside the dog’s caregiver, Boston Park Rangers, and the Boston Police, ARL’s rescue services team extended a catch-pole across the narrow stream to grab hold of the dog and pull him back onto solid ground. The Boxer received a warm welcome- and towel rub down- the minute his paws touched land. Click here to read the full rescue story.


 

ARL's rescue services team#2 – It was all net gains for dog in Norfolk

In June, timid pup Faith had her wish come true and found her forever home! Within only 2 short hours at her new house in Norfolk, MA, however, she was spooked by gun shots fired at a nearby range and ran off with her leash dragging behind her. Faith’s new family was absolutely devastated.

Fortunately, Faith stuck close to the neighborhood for the next 7 weeks and after other attempts to bring her home had failed, the dog’s family called ARL’s rescue services team. A humane drop net was set and the lucky dog was caught and returned to her owners the very next day! Since then Faith has become a social butterfly who loves frolicking along the beach and is inseparable from her canine brother. Click here to read the full rescue story.


 

ARL's rescue services team#1 – One lucky duck rescued from Gloucester Harbor

In February, a duck swimming in icy water found himself in a tangled mess. The brown and white aquatic bird was paddling through the harbor in Gloucester, MA when his feathers and feet suddenly became entangled in netting that had been floating nearby.

Dressed in head-to-toe ice suits, the ARL’s rescue services team carefully swam between small ice flows to reach the Eider who was almost 300-feet off-shore! The team successfully pulled the duck onto dry land, slowly but surely untangled his feathers from each piece of netting, and set him free!


It’s not too late to… DONATE NOW

The ARL doesn’t receive government or public funding to provide rescue services to animals in distress. Make a donation today to ensure domestic animals and wildlife get assistance when they need it most!

Visit arlboston.kintera.org/donate or click on the DONATE button below to make a donation to the Animal Rescue League of Boston!

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FUN FACT: ARL’s rescue services team helped bring 104 cats stuck in trees to safety so far in 2015!