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Category: Brewster
Dog Thunderstorm Safety

5 tips to comfort your pup during a storm (Hint: you’ll both rest easier!)

After a marathon of sizzling summer days (did someone say, It’s Too Hot for Spot®?), many New Englanders welcome the threat of a thunderstorm to cool the temperature down and reduce humidity in the air.

While a thunderstorm is an effective way for Mother Nature to give us some relief from the heat, it can also, unfortunately, be a huge source of stress for our canine companions.

According to the National Severe Storms Laboratory, there are about 100,000 thunderstorms in the United States each year. If you have a dog that suffers from astraphobia, a fancy word for “fear of thunder”, that can mean many moments of heightened anxiety for them- and some sleepless nights for you!Scared dog

Common signs of astraphobia in canines include hiding, excessive whining, intense barking, frantic pacing, scratching at surfaces, or destructive chewing. For some dogs, flashes of lightning, the howling of wind, drops of rain hitting the roof, or simply the change in air pressure can cause fearfulness.

If a loud boom sends your pooch diving under the covers, try these 5 tips to help give man’s-best-friend some much-needed comfort during a thunderstorm:

    1. Set up a safe space. Hiding is a natural instinct for pups that are fearful, so be sure to make a safe indoor area accessible to them. Many dogs consider their crate to be their “go to” hideout when their nerves kick in. Ramp-up the comfort factor by covering a wire crate with a thin sheet and placing a blanket and a couple of chew toys inside. Leave the door open so Fido doesn’t feel trapped.
    2. Cozy up with your pup. Just having you in the same room will make your dog feel safer during a storm. If your pooch enjoys snuggling or being petted, stick around for some quality time. Alternatively, placing an anxiety or “thunder vest” on your furry friend can be equally as comforting.
    3. Distract your dog. Try to engage your canine companion in his favorite game to keep his mind off the storm. If Fido remains calm, give him positive reinforcement by rewarding him with treats for his bravery during the storm.
    4. Pull down the blinds. Confine your pup to a windowless room, if possible. If not, pull down the blinds and close the curtains to cut off any visual stressors.
    5. Turn on some tunes. Play calming music or turn on the TV to minimize the sound of thunder from your pet’s sensitive ears.

Should I try giving my pet anti-anxiety medications or natural supplements? If your dog shows signs of extreme stress, always consult with their veterinarian before administering any type of medication or oral supplements to make sure that the ingredients are suitable for your pooch!

IT’S TOO HOT FOR SPOT®! Click here for more summer pet safety advice.


Happening Now: The ARL Joins Coalition to Improve the Protection and Treatment of Farm Animals

The Citizens for Farm Animal Protection advocates for an end to extreme confinement of farm animals in Massachusetts

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and other national and local animal welfare leaders have gathered on the front steps of the Massachusetts State House to formally announce their newly developed coalition, Citizens for Farm Animal Protection, and ballot initiative to curb animal abuse on industrial-style factory farms in Massachusetts.

The coalition aims to collect more than 90,000 signatures by Fall 2015 to help secure a spot on the 2016 ballot.

Mary Nee, president of the Animal Rescue League of Boston, explains why the ARL is in support of this ballot initiative: “The cruel confinement of farm animals is inhumane and also threatens the health and safety of Massachusetts residents through increased risk of foodborne illness.  When there’s an effort to improve the protection and treatment of animals – whether they are companion, working, or farm animals – the Animal Rescue League of Boston is there to help.

The Citizens for Farm Animal Protection coalition also includes the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Zoo New England, and United Farm Workers.

citizens for farm animal protection

In many industrial animal farms, hens are forced into battery cages so small that they cannot spread their wings. Their amount of “personal space” is smaller than an iPad!

The Citizens for Farm Animal Protection’s goal is to qualify a measure for the 2016 ballot phasing out the extreme confinement of farm animals — specificallyegg-laying hens, breeding pigs, and veal calves — in small crates and cages, requiring that these animals have enough room to turn around, lay down, and stretch their limbs.

Examples of extreme confinement on industrial-style factory farms include:

  • Egg-laying hens packed into battery cages so small that they cannot spread their wings
  • Breeding female pigs restricted to two-foot wide gestational crates that don’t allow them to take more than one step forward or backward
  • Veal calves restrained in crates too narrow to turn around or fully recline

Industrial animal operations put our health at risk: cramming tens of thousands of animals into tiny cages promotes the spread of diseases.

Numerous studies show that egg operations that confine hens in cages have higher rates of Salmonella, the leading cause of food poisoning-related death in America. Animals kept in extreme confinement often live in their own waste and are pumped full of drugs that can taint the food we eat.

If the 2016 ballot becomes law, it will also ensure that shell eggs, and whole, uncooked cuts of pork and veal sold in the Commonwealth are compliant with these modest standards

Ten states in the US have passed similar laws, and farmers in Massachusetts are already required to abide by the non-confinement regulations. Additionally, many local and major food retailers, including Dunkin Donuts, McDonald’s and Walmart, are currently working with food suppliers to make similar reforms.

Help protect farm animals! Look out for and sign the petition that will help secure the 2016 ballot to phase out extreme confinement on industrial-style factory farms.


Pets Get Allergies Too

The ARL shares 7 tips to help keep your pet’s allergies at bay this summer

Pet health and safety is on the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) mind all year long– especially during the summer months when the heat and outdoor activities are at their peak.  During our TOO HOT FOR SPOT ® campaign, we share advice on how to protect your pet in the warmer months. This week, we focus on a pesky condition that affects both humans and animals alike: allergies.

allergies

Is your pet showing allergy symptoms? A visit with your veterinarian can determine if your pet is suffering from airborne allergies.

Let’s face it; coping with airborne allergies is no fun for anyone. Pets with allergies develop a similar reaction to that of humans in that their immune system reacts to something that isn’t really a threat, such as tree pollen. Other typical airborne allergens include dander, dust, grasses, and mold spores.

As your cat or dog tries to rid their body of these allergens, a variety of symptoms may appear. Common symptoms of pets with allergies include: itchy and runny eyes, sneezing, snorting, snoring, increased scratching- especially of the ears, ear infections, and possibly diarrhea and vomiting.

While we can’t eliminate airborne allergens altogether, we can help keep our pet’s allergies at bay. The ARL shares 7 tips:

  1. Keep it clean. Wash your pet’s bedding and fabric toys in hot water and perfume-free detergent once a week. Frequently vacuum all materials in your home that trap dust (e.g., carpets, curtains, soafs).
  2. Close the windows to prevent allergens from coming into your home. Running an air filtration machine will also help trap sneaky airborne elements already in your home.
  3. Make bath time a weekly ritual. Allergens are easily trapped in your pet’s fur and a moisturizing oatmeal shampoo may help relieve dry, itchy skin.  Remember to rinse off your pet’s paws when they come in from the outdoors.
  4. Keep your pet cool and dry. Avoid keeping your pet in rooms where the environment lends itself to excessive moisture and dust, such as damp basements, laundry rooms, garages, or barns.
  5. Feed fresh food. Store your pet’s food and snacks in airtight containers until mealtime to avoid allergens from being ingested.
  6. Avoid cedar chips in pet beds and your pet off treated wood decks and out of cedar dog houses.
  7. Visit the vet. Only your pet’s veterinarian will be able determine whether or not your pet is suffering from airborne allergies. Your vet may recommend an antihistamine (e.g., Benadryl) or an allergy injection to help your pet develop resistance to the offending allergen.

TOO HOT FOR SPOT! For more summer pet safety advice, visit arlboston.org/summersafety.


Watch & Share: It’s TOO HOT FOR SPOT

Leaving a pet alone inside a hot car can have dangerous consequences

To raise awareness for this HOT animal welfare issue, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and Boston Veterinary Care ask our followers and the media to share important information about the dangers of leaving pets in parked cars during the warm summer months.

Pets don’t sweat like humans do and cannot cool their bodies efficiently in hot temperatures. Even when the outside temperature is 80 degrees, the inside of a car can heat up to more than 120 degrees in just minutes – even with the windows cracked! That’s why leaving your pet inside of a hot car is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke.

In following video, “Too Hot for Spot® – Dangers of Hot Cars for Pets”, ARL’s shelter animals explain the risks of leaving your pet alone inside a parked car.

Click the “play” button below to watch:

Spot a pet alone in a parked car? Follow these 3 steps:

  1. Take down the car’s make, model, and license plate number.
  2. Ask nearby store managers or security guards to make an announcement to find the dog’s owner.
  3. If the owner can’t be found, call the non-emergency number of your local police department or Animal Control Officer.

Help us spread the word about this HOT summer safety issue! Stop by ARL’s shelters in Boston and Brewster this Summer and pick up a Too Hot for Spot car magnet!  A donation is appreciated by not required.

SPECIAL THANKS to our Too Hot for Spot media sponsor Animal Hospital of Orleans and our media partners Cool 102, WBZ 1030, NECN, WEEI-FM, WEEI-AM/ESPN, and WRKO-AM.

too hot for spot


It’s Too Hot for Spot! Signs of Heat Stroke

BVC answers your FAQs about this potentially fatal condition

All Summer long, the ARL has been sharing advice during our TOO HOT FOR SPOT® campaign on how to

heat stroke

Never leave your pet alone in a parked car on a warm day- even with the windows cracked. It’s just TOO HOT FOR SPOT!

keep your pet safe in the warmer months. This week, we focus on identifying the symptoms of, and how to prevent heat stroke in your pet.

When temperatures begin to rise, so do concerns about animal safety. Even when the thermometer dips below 80 degrees, the threat for heat stroke still exists. Fortunately, pet owners who take the proper precautions can greatly reduce the risks of this potentially fatal condition.

Want to learn more? Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) answers some of your most FAQs:

Q. What is heat stroke?

A. Heat stroke is a serious condition caused by your pet’s body overheating, usually as a result of prolonged exposure to or physical exertion in high temperatures. Immediate medical attention by a veterinarian is required.

Q. What makes cats and dogs susceptible to heat stroke?

A: Pets don’t sweat the way humans do, which makes them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat. If their core body temperature rises too high (typically 104 degrees or higher), they run the risk of going into shock or organ failure.

Q. Which symptoms should I look for when trying to diagnose heat stroke in my pet?

A: More obvious symptoms of potential heatstroke in cats and dogs include: difficulty breathing, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness. More subtle symptoms include: heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, excessive thirst, lethargy.

Q. Is there anything I can do until my pet receives medical attention?

A: While you wait for assistance, apply cool wet towels to the groin and “underarm” areas. If your pet is alert enough, try having them slowly sip cold water. Even if your pet begins to appear better or more alert, you should still make an emergency visit to your pet’s veterinarian as only they will be able to diagnose whether or not your pet is suffering from heat stroke.

Q. How can I protect my cat or dog from getting heat stroke altogether?

A: Prevention is always your best bet. On hot days, leave your pet at home in a cool humidity and temperature-regulated room and keep them hydrated with a bowl of cold water accessible at all times. If your pet must be outdoors, find a shady spot with ample air flow and limit exercise to the morning or evening hours when temperatures are at their coolest.

Finally, never leave your pet alone in a parked car—even with the air conditioner on or the windows cracked. On an 85 degree day, the temperature inside a car can rise above 100 degrees in less than 10 minutes, which is why it is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke. It’s just TOO HOT FOR SPOT!

If you suspect that your pet is suffering from heat stroke, seek immediate medical attention from a veterinarian.

For more warm weather pet safety tips, visit arlboston.org/summer-safety


5 Tips for Dog Swimming Safety

Advice to keep your pup (and family!) safe and secure in the water

dog swimming safety dog with goggles

Did you know… dogs can still overheat even when in the water? Remember these 5 dog swimming safety tips during your next visit to your local watering hole.

All summer long, the ARL is sharing advice on how to protect your pet in the warmer months because some hot weather situations can just be TOO HOT FOR SPOT. With temperatures soaring this week, we focus on keeping your dog safe as you cool off swimming!

Whether it’s your backyard or neighborhood pool, creek, pond, or beach, taking a dip on these hot summer days can be an enjoyable and refreshing experience for both you and your canine companion.

Just as there are risks for any human during a swim session, the same goes for your pet. Preparedness and attentiveness are key to making sure that every member of the family practices water safety.

Here are 5 important dog swimming safety tips to keep in mind this summer:

1. Not all dogs can swim. Although one of the first swimming strokes we learn as humans is coined the “doggy paddle”, it does not necessarily mean that all dogs can swim.

In fact, some dogs may never feel comfortable in the water. Certain breeds with short snouts or broad compact bodies such as American bulldogs and pugs  are not always “naturals” when it comes to swimming and may require “lessons.”

Buying your pet a life vest flotation device is a great investment and will keep your pup afloat while you teach them to swim—and help support them later on should they get themselves into a watery situation.

2. Practice, practice, practice. Tossing a stick or a ball in the water, progressively further from shore or shallow steps is a good way to teach your pooch to feel comfortable in the water. When they’re ready for a real swim session, move on to a small pool or other contained body of water.

While some dogs may eager to jump right in, others may panic, so be prepared for either scenario.  If there’s only one set of stairs or a ramp, continue to refresh your pup’s memory about the quickest way to make an exit.

3. Limit access to bodies of water. Just as you would keep unsupervised children a safe distance with a gate or fence, the same should go for your canine companion. If a physical barrier isn’t possible, make sure your dog knows how to come when called in case they get too close to a body of water that they shouldn’t be near.

Taking your pup boating? During the day, be sure your dog is wearing a life vest at all times. At night, your canine companion should be kept securely in an inside room on the boat, as it may be too dark to locate them should they jump or fall overboard.

4. Supervise your dog at all times. Even strong swimmers can get into trouble, especially if they’re tired. Always take notice of your pooch’s energy level and call them in for frequent breaks. Have fresh water available and encourage them to drink whenever possible; dogs can still overheat when swimming!

Supervision is especially important if your dog is swimming in a river or ocean with a lot of movement. Before you allow Fido to jump in, take note of the current and tide, and check the water temperature. Look for any flags or postings related to potential swimming hazards. Even if water conditions look ideal, always make sure that you pup stays close to shore, so that you have the ability to react quickly should they get into trouble.

5. Beware of ear infections. After swimming, be sure to dry your pup’s ears thoroughly and carefully with a cotton ball. Since most dogs have ear canals that point straight down, it is easy for water and bacteria to get trapped, causing a painful ear infection.

Common symptoms of an ear infection in dogs include excessive ear scratching or rubbing against floor or furniture, redness, swelling, odor or discharge coming from the ear canal, unbalanced movement, and hearing loss. If you see signs of an ear infection, contact your dog’s veterinarian right away.

TOO HOT FOR SPOT!  For more summer safety tips, visit arlboston.org/summer-safety


7 Steps to Keep Your Dog Safe at the Park

Protect your pup from harm and health risks by following these important planning and safety tips

One of the most enjoyable activities during the summer months is a leisurely trip to your local park. Whether it’s for a picnic or a stroll, Fido will be more than happy to tag along!

A park can be an ideal venue for your dog to get the mental stimulation and physical exercise that they crave. All of the open space, fresh air, unique smells, and various types of people and animals can be a very exciting and stimulating experience for your pooch.

Of course, all the stimulation and interaction with unfamiliar people and dogs–not to mention the heat and humidity–can be hard on your pup.

In order to make sure the fun trip to the park you have planned stays that way for everyone in the family, follow these 7 steps:

  1. Choose your park wisely. Whether you’re planning to lay out a blanket and stay a while or just to take a stroll, select a park with plenty of shade and bring fresh drinking water. Your dog may not signal you when they’re overheated or tired, so build in frequent breaks in the shade for rest and re-hydration.  If you see signs of heatstroke, contact your pet’s veterinarian right away!
  2. Leave the retractable leash at home. The “locking” mechanism on a retractable leash can be tricky and an unreliable way to keep your dog close by.  Use a standard 4-6’ leash and you’ll be able to prevent or gain control of a potentially risky situation more quickly.  After all, any dog who sees a squirrel across a nearby street becomes a flight risk!  Very seriously, dog bites occur much more frequently in the warmer months due to heightened arousal from the heat, crowds, and smells.  A short leash will help prevent them from making uninvited contact with other dogs or children.
  3. Keep an eye on your dog at ALL times. Remain attentive, especially if you’re visiting an off-leash dog park, which can quickly turn into a stressful situation for your pet. Observe the other dogs and people in the park and your pup’s body language when they interact with them. Remember that even a dog that your pooch knows well can have an unexpected reaction, as the group dynamic can change any time a new dog enters or leaves the park.
  4. Plan early morning or evening outings. Between the hours of 10am-4pm, the sun and temperature is at its peak. Aim to limit outdoor exercise to breakfast and dinnertime so that Fido (and you!) doesn’t overheat. Remember, pets don’t sweat the way humans do, making them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat.
  5. Keep up-to-date on all vaccinations and parasite preventatives. This is especially important if your pup is interacting with other dogs. Respiratory illnesses like canine tracheobronchitis (kennel cough) and harmful parasites like heartworm, can easily spread from one dog to another. If you’re not certain if your pet’s vaccinations are current, contact your veterinarian.
  6. Pick up after your pup. Not only is it the “considerate” thing to do, but it’s also the sanitary thing to do. Many intestinal parasites, such as tapeworm and whipworm, can easily spread from one dog to another.  Like it or not, dogs sometimes do a little too much up close investigation into the interesting smells they encounter!  Many parks come equipped with garbage disposals and some even with pet waste bags, in case you run out.
  7. Consider leaving Fido at home. While many of us consider pets to be family and want to include them in every outing, the reality is that some events can be just too stressful on your pooch. If you plan to visit a crowded area or a lengthy event at the park–especially if you know your dog is shy or snippy when he or she first meets other people and dogs–the best decision for you and your pet is to leave them safely at home.

Summer can be TOO HOT FOR SPOT! No matter what the circumstance, remember to never leave your pet alone in a parked car—even with the air conditioner on or the windows cracked. On an 85 degree day, the temperature inside a car can rise above 100 degrees in less than 10 minutes, which is why it is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke

For more warm weather dog safety tips, visit arlboston.org/summer-safety


July is Parasite Awareness Month

5 helpful tips and a special at Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) to help protect your pet

During National Parasite Awareness Month this July, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) focus our attention on intestinal parasites that live in the inside the gastrointestinal (digestive) tract of dogs and cats.

Read BVC’s FAQs on intestinal parasites:

Q: What are intestinal parasites?

A: Intestinal parasites, sometimes referred to as “worms”, are organisms that typically live inside an animal’s intestinal wall. The most common forms of intestinal parasites are roundworms, tapeworms, hookworms, whipworms. These parasites are usually ingested by mouth and then work their way into the intestines where they can reproduce and cause symptoms.

While some intestinal parasites don’t show any signs, others can cause more noticeable symptoms, such as diarrhea, vomiting, weight loss, or dry fur or hair. In some dogs or cats, worm eggs can lay dormant (inactive) and only bring about symptoms during times of stress.

Q: Is only my pet at risk of contracting parasites? Or can it be transmitted to humans too?

A: Unfortunately, if your pet contracts an intestinal parasite, it can easily spread onto other pets and human family members too. Pets and young children are most at risk because they are more likely to ingest contaminated soil, sand, grass, or food that has fallen on the ground.

Q: How do veterinarians diagnose intestinal parasites in pets?

A: Most intestinal parasites are diagnosed by using a microscope to find eggs in a fecal sample. Because animals are exposed to parasites in their environment throughout their life, routine fecal examinations allow many parasites to be treated before they can cause symptoms or spread to other animals and humans.

Q: How can I prevent my pet and other family members from contracting intestinal parasites?

A: Simple preventative measures can reduce the risks associated with the transmission of intestinal parasites to pets and people. Protect your pet and family by following these 6 important guidelines:

  1. Clean up and dispose of pet waste regularly. Dog and cat feces should be picked up immediately and cat litter boxes should be changed daily. Be sure to dispose of pet waste properly and never handle directly with your bare hands.
  2. Maintain good personal hygiene within your household. Wash your hands immediately after coming into contact with pet waste, raw meat, sand, or soil. Encourage children to wash their hands after playing outdoors or coming into contact with an animal, especially one that is not your household pet.
  3. Feed pets cooked or packaged food; never feed them raw meat. Change their water bowl several times a day.
  4. Supervise young children sitting in the yard, sandbox, or playground. Discourage them from eating food that has fallen on the ground or putting their hands in their mouth after touching sand or soil.
  5. Cover sandboxes and play areas when not in use. This will prevent wildlife and stray animals from contaminating the areas where your pets or children play.
roundworm, whipworm, hookworm, tapeworm parasites

During Parasite Awareness Month this July, protect your pet and family members from “worms” that can cause gastrointestinal issues!

As always, prevention is key! Schedule your pet for annual veterinary appointments and be sure to ask your veterinarian about year-round parasite preventatives. To make an appointment with Boston Veterinary Care, please call (617) 226-5605 or email bvc@arlboston.org.

 


Some July 4th Activities Can Be Too Hot for Spot

Keep your pup cool with these 5 safety tips and a DIY frozen treat

For humans across the United States, the Fourth of July signifies a time for family and friends, BBQs, beaches, and fireworks. For our canine friends, however, the holiday can be one of over-stimulation – too many people, too much sun, loud noises, and overwhelming smells.

This July 4th, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) want to remind you that the summer heat and bustle of the weekend’s festivities may be too stressful on your pup.

Keep your dog safe by following these 5 important tips:

  1. Leave your pup indoors in a small quiet cool room. Tuning on a TV or radio at a low volume can help detract from outside noises. Leave them free to roam around so that they don’t feel too confined.
  2. Always keep your canine on a leash or in a carrier if they must be outside. Set them up in a cool shady spot with ample air flow and plenty of fresh water.
  3. Keep your pooch away from potentially hazardous objects. Secure your pet a good distance from fireworks, sparklers, BBQs, and pools. Remember that some pets can become “fearfully aggressive” due to loud noises, so monitor them closely, especially around small children.
  4. Never leave your pup alone in a parked car if they must travel with you. On a hot day, the temperature inside a parked car can cause deadly heatstroke- even with the windows cracked.
  5. Make sure your dog’s microchip and ID tag information is current. Many animal shelters report increases of “stray” animals after July 4th due to the number of pets running away from the noise and excitement. Be sure your contact information is current and always on your pup’s collar to ensure an easy reunion should they be separated from you.

Your best bet? Leaving your dog at home is always the right decision for you and your pet. Prevention is responsible pet ownership.

Learn more at arlboston.org/summersafety

Want to keep your pup cool and occupied in the summer heat? Learn how to make this simple DIY frozen dog treat!

Press the “play” button below to watch this step-by-step video:

DIY summer dog treats


Summer Situations May Be TOO HOT FOR SPOT

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) shares advice all summer long on how to keep your pet safe in the warmer months

After a long [record-breaking] snowy Winter in New England, Summer is finally upon us! We’ve been waiting a long time for sunny and warm weather, so we’re all understandably eager to spend as much time as possible with our two-legged and four-legged family members and friends enjoying the outdoors.

Just as we humans protect ourselves from the sun and elements with sunscreen, hats, bug repellant, and staying hydrated in the hot sun, our pets need that kind of protection too.

it's too hot for spot to be alone in a parked car

Never leave your pet alone in a parked car on a warm day- even with the windows cracked. It’s just TOO HOT FOR SPOT!

When temperatures begin to rise, so do concerns about animal safety.

Even when temperatures dip below 80 degrees, the threat for heat stroke still exists. Remember that pets don’t sweat the way humans do, making them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat.

From July through September, our Too Hot For Spot public education campaign will offer a series of tips on how to keep your pet safe throughout the summer.

Keep your furry family members healthy by following these important basic guidelines:

  • Prevention is always your best bet. Whenever possible, leave your pet at home in a cool humidity- and temperature-regulated room.
  • If your pet must be outdoors, find a shady spot with ample air flow to prevent overheating.
  • Hydration is key. Keep a bowl of cold water accessible at all times.
  • Limit exercise to the morning or evening hours when temperatures are at their coolest.
  • Never leave your pet alone in a parked car—even with the air conditioner on or the windows cracked. On an 85 degree day, the temperature inside a car can rise above 100 degrees in less than 10 minutes, which is why it is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke. It’s just too hot for Spot!

If you suspect that your pet is suffering from heat stroke, seek immediate medical attention from a veterinarian.

Common symptoms of heatstroke in dogs and cats include: heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness.

For more warm weather pet safety tips, visit arlboston.org/summer-safety