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Category: News
ARL Caring for Several Diabetic Cats

Cases of diabetes rapidly rising nationally – link to pet obesity

Diabetes is the second most common endocrine disease (hyperthyroidism is the most common) in cats, and the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) has seen several cats afflicted with the disease over the past year – recent statistics also indicate the number of cases are rapidly increasing.

The drastic increase can partly be attributed to the rise in pet obesity.

Webster, a 10-year-old male cat, was picked up as a stray in Malden, MA in late January, and had typical signs of living on the streets including dental disease and muscle wasting. However, his blood work revealed a glucose level of 349 – anything over 170 is considered high.

ARL’s shelter medicine staff continued diagnostic testing, instilled dietary changes and constantly monitored Webster hoping to rule out a diabetic diagnosis. However, a fructosamine test, which determines how the animal’s body is regulating blood glucose levels over a 2-3 week period, indicated that Webster’s body was not regulating properly and was properly diagnosed with diabetes.

The cat was placed into foster care, and is currently on a regimen of insulin injections twice a day, 12 hours apart, and after eating. Webster is also on a strict diet of wet and dry food specially formulated for managing diabetes.

Despite the diagnosis, Webster will have a good quality of life, his new owners will simply have to be diligent about follow-up veterinary care and ensuring insulin is administered as prescribed. Once his glucose can be regulated he will be ready to find his forever home!

Approximately half the cats diagnosed with diabetes can achieve remission if the disease is treated promptly – cats in remission may be able to stop insulin entirely as well.

Know the Signs

Diabetic symptoms vary and in addition to increased thirst and decreased activity, other signs include:

  • Weight loss
  • Change in litterbox habits
  • Appetite swings
  • Vomiting
  • Unsteady gait
  • Overall poor health

More than half the cats and dogs in the U.S. are overweight, and as long as pet obesity continues to be an issue, the number of diagnosed cases of diabetes in our pets will continue to rise. ARL encourages pet owners to strictly monitor their animal’s diets, limit treats and take action if a pet begins to gain or lose weight rapidly.


Senior Stray Finds Perfect Forever Home

“Frankie” required extensive medical care at ARL

In early January, 2019, Frankie, an 11-year-old Shih-Tzu, was found wandering the cold streets of Boston.

Given Frankie’s hearing and vision impairments, amazingly he wasn’t injured while living on the streets.

He was however, in dire need of medical attention.

Frankie’s initial veterinary exam revealed a handful of masses (both epidermal and oral), dental disease, and hearing loss. Additionally, x-rays were taken and blood was drawn for additional diagnostic testing.

The masses were removed and determined to be benign, however Frankie’s bloodwork revealed abnormalities which pointed to possible renal disease and pancreatitis.

The next month for Frankie would consist of more testing, frequent veterinary rechecks, and unfortunately additional findings.

While Frankie’s ongoing diagnostic testing showed improvement, there were further developments — the 11-year-old pup was diagnosed with glaucoma in one eye which needed to be removed; and a heart murmur was also discovered.

A Long Road Home

Despite all the testing and continuous discoveries, Frankie maintained a wonderful, friendly demeanor and was finally ready to find his forever home.

Frankie quickly found his perfect match, and will spend his golden years in a quiet home along the scenic North Shore.

Extraordinary Care

From routine exams to complex surgery, ARL’s shelter medicine staff provides extraordinary care for every animal that comes through ARL’s doors. Last year alone, more than $550,000 was spent to ensure these animals were healthy and happy. ARL does not receive any government grants or public funding, relying solely on the generosity of individuals like you to make our important work possible.

Please consider donating today to ensure these animals get the medical treatment they need!


Meet the 2019 ARL Boston Marathon Team!

ARL’s 9th run with John Hancock Boston Marathon Charity Team

Thanks to the generosity of the John Hancock Marathon Nonprofit Program, two dedicated and compassionate runners will take on the world-renowned 26.2 mile Boston Marathon course to help animals in need.

Our runners aim to raise more than $20,000 for ARL’s animals and programs, all while taking part in the annual Patriot’s Day run from Hopkinton to Boston.

Learn more about why our team members chose to run for ARL and how you can support them below…

Annie Seneski

“I am running for ARL to give all animals a chance to find a happy home. Our dog, Daisy, was adopted from ARL this summer and we couldn’t imagine life without her.”

Support Annie at https://www.crowdrise.com/o/en/campaign/animal-rescue-league-of-boston-boston-2019/annieseneski1

 

 

Allegra Manacher

“Since moving to Boston 3.5 years ago, I’ve been volunteering at the ARL and am extremely fond of the organization – its mission, people, and most of all, the animals we help. It is a great privilege to raise funds for my favorite charity.”

Support Allegra at https://www.crowdrise.com/o/en/campaign/animal-rescue-league-of-boston-boston-2019/allegramanacher

 

 

 

A very special thanks to our dedicated runners who have trained hard and worked tirelessly to raise money for animals in our community.

The 123rd running of the Boston Marathon will be on Monday, April 15.

Show your support for team members by making a donation to an individual runner or on the ARL Boston Marathon Team fundraising page at https://www.crowdrise.com/o/en/campaign/animal-rescue-league-of-boston-boston-2019


How a Bill Becomes Law in Massachusetts

On January 2, 2019, the Massachusetts General Court began its 2019-2020 session. The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) will continue to support legislation that enhances and improves protections for animals and to oppose reforms that endanger the welfare of animals in Massachusetts.

Click here to see ARL’s 2019-2020 legislative agenda.

The Massachusetts Legislature runs in a two-year cycle by calendar year, with each new cycle beginning in the January after the biennial state election.

Legislation may be filed by members of the House and Senate, and by the Governor. The state constitution also allows citizens to ask their legislators to present bills “by request”.

Each new session, hundreds to thousands bills are filed, but only a select few actually become law.

While the process is quite complex, here are 8 main steps a bill needs to go through before it becomes law:

  1. Bill Drafting. This document details every aspect of the proposed statute.
  2. Securing a Sponsor. The legislative sponsor will be the champion and voice for the statute.
  3. Bill Filing. Upon filing, each bill is assigned a number and referred to a committee.
  4. Joint Committee Hearing. This public forum allows members of the public, government officials, and office holders to speak either in favor of or against a proposed statute.
  5. Joint Committee Executive Session and Report. Following the hearing, the committee will decide if the statute will continue in the process.
  6. Bill Readings.
    a. First Reading. If reported favorably by committee, the bill appears in the Journal of the House or Senate, and given its first reading. The bill is then typically referred to another committee for further review.
    b. Second Reading. At this stage, the bill is debated and subject to motions and amendments.
    c. Third Reading. The bill continues to be subject to debate, motions, and amendments in the House or Senate. Once debated, a vote is taken to pass the bill to be engrossed. If passed, the bill moves on to the other legislative branch.
  7. Consideration. If the bill advances through three readings and is engrossed in the second legislative branch, it will be sent to the Legislative Engrossing Division to be typed on special parchment – as required by law.
  8. Bill Enacted. A vote to enact by both legislative branches passes the bill, and the newly created law will then be sent to the governor for consideration. The governor can: sign the bill into law; veto the bill; or send the bill back to the Legislature with recommended amendments. In general, laws become effective 30-90 days after the Governor’s signature.

Take Action!

Lobbying is the key to a bill’s momentum as it goes through the legislative process. It’s more than just standing up and saying “I support this”.

A successful lobbying strategy includes the following:

  • Compiling an informational packet containing a one-page fact sheet on the bill, and any relevant news articles that support the bill
  • Meeting with elected officials is critical – don’t just drop by, arrange a sit-down meeting to discuss the legislation and ALWAYS follow-up with a thank you note!
  • Reach out to local media through press releases in order to publically discuss the bill and to introduce it to a wider audience to garner further support

WBZ Highlights Animal Hoarding

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) recently collaborated with veteran WBZ investigative reporter Cheryl Fiandaca to shed light on an issue that unfortunately is on the rise – animal hoarding.

In 2018, ARL was involved in 16 major hoarding incidents which involved 1,024 animals. This number is more than triple from what ARL saw the previous year, and this is an issue that impacts communities throughout Massachusetts.

Animal hoarding is a serious, yet under-recognized community problem in Massachusetts that is responsible for substantial animal suffering. Often associated with adult self-neglect and/or mental illness, animal hoarding can also place children, the elderly, dependent adults, property, and public health at risk. The situations that ARL encounters are becoming more frequent and increasingly complex.

To watch the complete WBZ story click here!


Press Release: Microchip Helps Reunite Lost Cat with Owners

Family notified of cat being found on Valentine’s Day

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is once again reminding the public of the importance of having pets microchipped – this after recently reuniting a Stoughton, MA, family with their cat who went missing shortly before Christmas.

Four-year-old Tigger snuck out of his Stoughton home on December 23, 2018, to explore the outdoors. Perhaps spooked by his surroundings, Tigger ran when his owners tried to get him back inside and unfortunately did not return.

In the following days and weeks, Tigger’s family posted the cat’s picture on social media and posted flyers in their neighborhood and nearby businesses – but still Tigger was not found.

Tigger back in the comforts of home but with a reminder of the elements — note the frostbite on his left ear.

On February 10, a local resident brought a stray cat to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center. The cat was emaciated, dehydrated, and had suffered from frostbite on its left ear and front paw due to long-term exposure to the elements.

The cat received fluids and was checked by ARL staff and was also scanned for a microchip. The chip was registered to a Florida resident, however after a little detective work, ARL tracked the owner from Florida to Stoughton.

A certification letter was sent to the Stoughton address, and owner Jackie Rhone tells ARL the cat was originally a gift for her 17-year-old daughter, and after two months had given up any hope of finding Tigger.

“That evening (Valentine’s Day) we went out for an errand and when we returned home my husband checked the mail, and when he came inside he screamed “read this Jackie quick”! I started reading it out loud with tears rolling down my face and said “they found our Tigger!”’, Rhone said.

Tigger was reunited with his family two days later and is now strictly an indoor cat.

This reunion would not have been possible if Tigger hadn’t been microchipped.

A Permanent ID

A microchip is a computer chip about the size of a grain of rice, programmed with an identification number unique to your pet. It is non-toxic, non-allergenic, and will last the life of your pet with no maintenance required.

A microchip greatly increases the likelihood of being reunited with a lost pet – an AVMA study shows 52 percent of dogs with microchips are reunited with owners, versus just 21 percent with dogs with no microchip. Owner return rates for cats with microchips is 38 percent versus 1.8 percent for cats without the chip.

ARL recommends pet owners to ensure their animal is microchipped, and to also keep contact information up to date.


Boston Globe Subscribers – YOU Can Help ARL!

Vote for ARL as Your Favorite Non-profit

The GRANT allows Globe subscribers to show their support for non-profits by choosing which organizations get free advertising space in The Boston Globe. In February, subscribers began receiving their silver envelopes in the mail, and have until April 30 to either return the voucher, or submit their GRANT dollars online.

 

Maggie the pup

Submitting your GRANT voucher is an easy way to help animals like Maggie find their forever home!

 

View the Leaderboard

ARL does not receive any government or public funding and relies solely on the generosity of compassionate individuals to carry out our important work to help animals and communities in need. Free ad space in The Boston Globe would allow ARL to reach even more people about the mission, values, programs and services that make ARL an unwavering champion for animals in need.

If you haven’t sent in your voucher, you have until April 30 to do so, please remember to write in the “Animal Rescue League of Boston” as your non-profit choice and spread the word to your fellow Boston Globe subscribers. 


BVC Medical Director Utilizes Pencil for Dislocated Jaw

Cats. They just seem to find the oddest places to hide, and for Trixie, a 1.5-year-old cat, this past week she decided (unbeknownst to her owner) that behind a dresser drawer would be a fabulous place to lay low.

Unfortunately when her owner closed the drawer, the curious cat was caught between a drawer and a hard place, and suffered a dislocated jaw. As a result, Trixie could not close her mouth.

Her very concerned owner brought the cat to Boston Veterinary Care (BVC), where Trixie was sedated and examined.

Trixie on the mend after BVC veterinarian Dr. Nicole Breda used a pencil as a fulcrum to pop her dislocated jaw back in place.

X-rays confirmed which side of the jaw had dislocated, and the next question became – how to pop it back into place?

BVC Medical Director Dr. Nicole Breda used a good old-fashioned No. 2 pencil as a fulcrum, placing it in the way back of the jaw on the left side and slowly closed Trixie’s mouth. The pencil did the trick as the jaw popped perfectly back into place!

Trixie will make a full recovery and was sent home with anti-inflammatories and placed on a soft food diet for a week, but after that she’ll be ready to find her next hiding spot.

Another tool in the toolbox for the veterinary team at BVC.

About Boston Veterinary Care

BVC is a clinic with a mission as all profits benefit the shelter animals of ARL. BVC aspires to integrate the health of animals into the community consciousness for both the benefit of animals and people, and to serve ARL’s mission of keeping animals safe and healthy out of shelters and in the habitats and homes where they belong.

BVC provides a host of services including wellness exams, surgery, dental care, radiology and advanced diagnostics. New clients receive a free wellness exam, and Tuesday evenings are cat-only, to promote a low-stress environment.

To schedule an appointment call (617) 226-5605 or email bvc@arlboston.org.


Surrendered Horse Returns to Original Owners

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) aims to place every animal in our care into loving homes, but for George, an approximately 23-year-old saddlebred horse, an amazing collaborative effort helped him be reunited with his original owners – 15 years later and 1,300 miles away!

To see a video on George’s amazing story click here!

George came to ARL in September 2018 with several other horses who were surrendered when their owner could no longer properly care for them.

George was slightly underweight and needed medical care and general grooming but was overall in good health.

After spending a couple of months recuperating at ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center, George was put into foster care, and almost immediately his foster parent and equine enthusiast Cordula Robinson realized that she was caring for an extraordinary animal.

“He was highly intelligent, elegant, well-trained and had clearly known love, he was very engaged with humans,” Robinson said.

Talking to a trainer friend, Cordula was encouraged to reach out to saddlebred agencies up and down the east coast to see if someone would recognize George, and was surprised when someone in New Jersey reached out.

Turns out that George was well-known in the saddlebred world, and competed under the name “Midnight Memory Maker”.

Sadly, his original owner, Todd Mathieson, passed away in 2006, and Todd’s wife Diane decided to rehome George. George did however continue to compete for a number of years.

When Diane was contacted, she was overwhelmed and ecstatic for the possibility of being reunited with George, after spending 15 years apart.

Thanks to a collaborative effort, arrangements were made to transport George from Boston to Ocala, Florida and this week George and Diane were reunited and the former show horse has now come full circle and is back with his original family to enjoy his retirement.

ARL is grateful to everyone whose compassion for animals helped make this incredible reunion possible!


It’s National Spay and Neuter Awareness Month!

Spay and Neutering Pets Promotes Health and Longevity

For all of us, the health and well-being of our beloved family pets is paramount; and the simplest way to reduce nuisance and aggressive behaviors, improve long-term health and longevity, is to have your dog or cat spayed or neutered.

February is National Spay and Neuter Awareness Month, and here at the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), we field questions about spay and neuter on a daily basis which typically revolve around two issues – cost and understanding the real and long-term benefits for you and your pet.

Affordable Options Exist

Don’t let cost be a barrier, as there are numerous affordable options throughout Massachusetts that are readily available.

Be sure to talk with your veterinarian about your best course of action, but here are a couple of options.

ARL’s Spay Waggin’ is a mobile veterinary clinic offering high-quality and affordable spay and neuter services. The Spay Waggin’ has been serving Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard, the South Shore and South Coast for nearly 20 years; performing more than 50,000 surgeries along the way.

Another place to turn is your local Animal Control Officer. The Massachusetts Animal Fund’s spay and neuter voucher program allows low-income residents receiving state assistance to get their pets this important surgery free of charge. Vouchers can be obtained through your city or town’s Animal Control Officer and are redeemed at participating providers, including ARL’s Spay Waggin’ and Community Surgical Clinic.

By the way, you can help keep this program going by donating on your state tax form on line 33f!

Long-Term Health Benefits

Caring for animals can be expensive, especially when it comes to their health. But consider this – having your pet spayed or neutered can reduce the risk of serious, and costly, health problems later in life.

Neutering male dogs and cats before six months of age prevents testicular cancer and spaying female cats and dogs before their first heat reduces the risk of uterine infections and breast cancer.
Spaying and neutering can also reduce behavioral problems such as marking territory, howling or barking, aggression and wandering.

We all want our pets to live long and healthy lives, and having an animal spayed or neutered actually increases their longevity. According to published reports, neutered male dogs live 18 percent longer than unneutered males, and spayed females live 23 percent longer than spayed females.

Healthy Moms, Happy Litters

How about if you have a pet at home with an unwanted or accidental litter of puppies or kittens? No problem, the Animal Rescue League of Boston can help.

Through the Healthy Moms, Happy Litters program, ARL will provide free spay and neuter services and vaccinations for mother/father dogs and cats. Once the procedure is complete, and animals are returned to the owner.

ARL will also waive the surrender fee for the litter of puppies or kittens, who will be spayed or neutered, vaccinated and placed up for adoption.

Remember, there are an abundance of resources and help available to those who need it so please consider having your pet spayed or neutered for their happiness, their health, and for your piece of mind.