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Category: News
Boston Duck Tours Discovers Cat Family at Dorchester Facility

Mom and five kittens rescued off the streets

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is commending Boston Duck Tours for their compassion and care for animals in our communities, as workers at the company’s maintenance facility in Dorchester recently alerted ARL to the presence of a family of stray cats.

The female and male cats were thought to be living in an unused DUCK boat outside the facility, but had the litter elsewhere. Employees at the garage facility were feeding the cats daily and were keeping a close eye on them, but knew they needed to get off the streets.

Once contacted, an ARL Field Services agent responded to the facility, located at 11 Sturtevant St. in Dorchester, and was able to rescue the mother cat (appropriately named “Sturtevant”) and her five kittens who are estimated to be about 4-6 weeks old.

Sturtevant remains at ARL’s Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center to receive medical care and socialization, while her kittens are in foster care.

Sturtevant has a ways to go behaviorally, and ARL volunteers and staff are working with her everyday to increase her trust and reduce her fear. The kittens, while starting off hissy, are now showcasing their personalities and will be sure to make wonderful pets.

Exchanging Quacks for Meows

Showing their soft side, several employees at the Boston Duck Boats facility have asked ARL to adopt the kittens once they are available for adoption. Sturtevant will also be made available for adoption, however, she is still frightened and when she is made available will be up to her.

Make the Call

With approximately 700,000 community roaming the streets throughout Massachusetts, Boston Duck Tours did the right thing by contacting ARL to rescue these cats. ARL’s Community Cat Initiative aims to get as many off these animals off the streets and into loving home as possible and asks that anyone noticing stray cats, or any homeless domesticated animal around their home or neighborhood to contact ARL Field Services at 617-426-9170.


ARL Participates in Community Celebrations

Parades bring out the best in communities.

Pride, joy, unity, among others. For the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), whether it be Boston’s South End, Dedham, or Brewster, we are more than a service agency for animals – we are a part of the communities in which we reside and are honored to participate in celebrations that bring these communities together.

This past Friday, Dedham hosted its 52nd annual Flag Day Parade, and ARL was once again honored to march in this grand, patriotic event.

Flag day of course marks the adoption of the flag of the United States on June 14, 1777, by the Second Continental Congress and Dedham’s parade is one not to miss!

With thousands of onlookers, ARL was in the midst of more than a dozen marching bands, drum and bugle corps, jazz bands, bagpipers, and hundreds of marchers, floats and flag bearers.

This is an event that ARL is proud to be a part of year after year and is already looking forward to 2020!

Over in the South End, ARL marched in the 49th annual Boston Pride Parade, which attracts thousands every year to celebrate equality, unity and community.

The massive parade route cuts through the heart of downtown Boston, ending at City Hall Plaza. The theme for this year’s parade was “looking back, loving forward,” honoring the 50-year anniversary of the famous Stonewall Riots, which paved the way for the Pride Movement.

ARL was ecstatic for the opportunity to take part in this important annual event to celebrate with our friends, neighbors and community.

To everyone who participated in these special events – THANK YOU!


Press Release: ARL Caring for Abandoned Chihuahua

A two-year-old Chihuahua is settling in at the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center – this after being abandoned on an enormous property in Southbridge that was once an American icon.

Bailey was recently discovered wandering among the dozens of abandoned buildings of the former American Optical property. Because the area’s gated, Southbridge Animal Control Officer Katelyn Spencer told ARL that no one enters the property by mistake and that it’s become a common animal dumping ground.

The dog is healthy, adorable, and friendly, but is also shy and easily frightened. Since arriving at ARL, Bailey has been vaccinated, spayed and microchipped and is currently available for adoption.

ARL once again reminds the public that abandoning an animal is NEVER an option. It constitutes animal cruelty, which is a felony crime in Massachusetts. If you are unable or unwilling to properly care for an animal, there are resources available to ensure the animal is taken care of and rehomed.

More Than a Century of Assistance

ARL has great relationships with municipalities throughout the Commonwealth and are always ready to assist – in this case, ARL worked with the Southbridge Animal Control Officer and travelled more than 60 miles one-way to take custody of Bailey.

A simple phone call to a local ACO or visit to a local shelter can get the process started for surrendering an animal and there are never judgements or shaming – anyone involved in animal welfare simply wants what’s best for the animal.


Kitten Season is in Full Swing

A pair of kittens rescued along the busy American Legion Highway in Roslindale this past week capped a busy month for the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Field Services.

From Metro Boston, Metro West, to the South Shore and points in-between, the department rescued 40 kittens during the month of May alone, and June is shaping up to be another busy month. Over the past 16 weeks, ARL Field Services has rescued about 80 kittens total!

The aforementioned kittens were noticed by a passing driver wandering along a rock retaining wall and contacted ARL Field Services for assistance. The feisty six-week-old kittens were brought to ARL’s Boston Animal Care and Adoption Center and will be placed into foster care until they are ready to find permanent homes.

This is the height of kitten season, as warmer temperatures lead to increased mating and an explosion of newborn kittens.

These new cat families can be found almost anywhere – under your porch, in a backyard woodpile and anywhere that can provide safety and privacy for the mother cat and her offspring. Kittens have also been discovered in industrial and busy shopping areas – and they need our help.

Unfortunately, ARL has seen a number of instances where the mother cat may have been injured while out looking for food, or simply left offspring to fend for themselves. This creates a dangerous situation for the kittens who are far too young to be able to care for themselves.

Keeping an Eye Out

With an estimated 700,000 community cats living on the streets throughout Massachusetts, ARL believes getting these kittens and mama cats off the streets and into loving homes is imperative. ARL urges anyone who notices kittens in their yard, neighborhood or even out running errands to contact ARL Field Services at 617-226-9170 for assistance.


ARL Advocates Animal Protection Bills at State House

On Tuesday, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) travelled to the Massachusetts State House to provide testimony on two animal protection bills for the Joint Committee on Municipalities and Regional Government.

Committee hearings are an important step for proposed legislation – if the bill is reported favorably by the committee, it will then move on in the legislative process. Click here to see how a bill becomes a law in Massachusetts.

ARL’s first round of testimony focused on S.114/H.1774 – An Act Protecting the Health and Safety of Puppies and Kittens in Cities and Towns. This bill has several components including:

  • Prohibit the sale of puppies and kittens under eight weeks of age;
  • Update laws relating to kennel licensing;
  • End the roadside sale of animals; and
  • Require the establishment of state-wide rules and regulations used for boarding and daycare facilities.

Currently there are no state-wide regulations that govern boarding kennels and animal daycare facilities in Massachusetts, and ARL believes this bill is vital to help keep our pets safe when left in someone else’s hands.

ARL also recently launched The Kennel 9, a new animal safety campaign giving pet owners nine things to consider before boarding their pet.

Testifying in favor of the bill were ARL Vice President of Animal Welfare & Veterinary Services Dr. Edward Schettino and ARL Director of Law Enforcement Lt. Alan Borgal.

Also joining the panel were Auburn Animal Control Officer Aimee Contois, Auburn Director of Development and Inspectional Services Darlene Coyle – Auburn officials worked jointly with ARL in 2018 to remove 61 animals from a hoarding situation in the town.

Lastly, Scituate resident Tracey Siciliano provided testimony pertaining to the need of boarding kennel regulations.

In 2016, Siciliano’s three-year-old Golden Doodle “Ben” suffered fatal injuries after being attacked by a dog belonging to the owner of a Hanover kennel facility, which has since closed. In addition to the dozens of attack wounds, Ben was also suffering from heat stroke. The owner was found “not-guilty” for negligence, due in part to a lack of regulations.

“I believe that regulations and enforcement might have prevented Ben’s death or, at a minimum, regulations could have persuaded a jury to hold the kennel owner responsible for his actions,” Siciliano said. “I urge the legislature to enact this law so that no other family ever has to experience the pain my family has endured from having lost our beloved Ben.”

Cruel Conditions

ARL President Mary Nee and Lt. Borgal testified in favor of S.989, H.1822 – An Act Enhancing the issuance of Citations for Cruel Conditions for Animals. This bill amends MA General Law Ch. 140 Section 174E to include all domestic animals. Currently the law only allows citations for dogs.

This amendment would allow an effective response to problematic and escalating issues including animal hoarding, and farm animal cruelty situations i.e. the 2016 Westport cruelty case.

Citations provide officers a tool to achieve corrective action before a situation rises to a violation of the animal cruelty statute.

Be an Advocate for Animals

With more than 90 animal-related bills filed for this legislative session, this hearing was critical to help move these important animal protection bills forward in the legislative process. But we can’t do it alone. Your elected officials work for you, so please take a look at ARL’s 2019-2020 legislative agenda, and contact your representatives to show your support for improving laws to protect animals in Massachusetts.


Cat Family Rescued in Mattapan

For several weeks, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Field Services had been tracking a stray mama cat on the streets of Mattapan. She was clearly nursing, but her litter was nowhere to be found.

After numerous visits to the residence to check her status, this week ARL was finally able to bring the mom and baby to safety – thanks to perseverance, the resident taking action, and a little bit of luck.

The resident at the home where the mama cat had been hanging around was in the midst of moving this week, and when ARL arrived on-scene, the friendly one-year-old came up for a visit, and with only one breast carrying milk, it was clear there was only one kitten to be found.

During the visit professional movers were going in and out of the home, and ARL agents were scouring the property trying to locate the kitten. Suddenly, a mover ran out and exclaimed “I found the kitten!”

Sure enough, the four-week-old kitten was tucked away behind a bookshelf, which then begged the question – how did it get there?

The mama cat (now named Fremont), had not been inside the home previously, but must have taken advantage of the traffic going in and out of the home and at some point dashed inside to bring her little one to a safe place.

Reunited, the Fremont Family was moved to ARL’s Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center to be medically evaluated and placed into foster care until they are ready to find a loving forever home.

YOU Can be a Champion for Community Cats

The Mattapan resident was a tremendous help to ARL, as she not only fed Fremont, but was constantly monitoring her as well. If you spot a possible stray around your property or in your neighborhood, please contact ARL’s Field Services. Your action can help get these animals off the streets and into a loving home.


Update: 50 Cats Removed from Metro Boston Home Easter Weekend

Cats are slowly gaining trust and settling in

During the Easter holiday weekend, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Law Enforcement Department was busy removing 50 cats from a Metro Boston home, which has since been condemned due to deplorable and uninhabitable conditions.

We’re made aware when these animals are removed from these difficult situations, but what happens then?

These animals have needed extensive medical treatment over the last three weeks, but perhaps more importantly, the majority of these cats are traumatized and shut down emotionally.

This unfortunately is a common byproduct of animal hoarding and one ARL sees too often.

The cats need constant interaction with humans to break free of the trauma, learn to trust, and to take the next step – which is finding a forever home.

ARL volunteers and staff have taken extraordinary measures to get these cats to break free of their fear by talking softly with encouragement, offering treats, using backscratchers to simulate petting, playing purring sounds – and finally when the cat is ready to move on to the next step, a reassuring hand is slowly extended towards the animal.

To see local media coverage of this story click here!

These measures are used to break through the wall of fear, but it’s done on the cat’s own terms.

It’s a painstaking process where there is no timeline on when a break-through may occur. ARL is committed to making these animals whole, and to give them the second chance they deserve.

So far one of these cats has been adopted, while another is waiting to find their forever home, sure signs that these animals are progressing with each passing day.

Hoarding-Type Situations Increasing

The number of hoarding-type incidents involving large numbers of animals is unfortunately on the rise. In 2018, ARL handled 16 of these incidents, which involved 1,024 animals.

As spring melts into summer, warm temperatures bring a surge in the animal population and ARL expects to respond to more hoarding-type incidents over the next few months.

With hoarding-type situations, ARL is ready to help both the animals and people involved. If you are aware of such a situation, please contact ARL Law Enforcement or your local Animal Control Officer immediately.


Press Release: ARL Unveils “The Kennel-9” Campaign

Nine things to consider before boarding a pet

With vacation season right around the corner, today the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is launching “The Kennel-9” – a public awareness and safety campaign to help ensure pets are properly cared for while at a boarding facility.

Currently, there are no state-wide regulations that govern boarding kennels and animal daycare facilities in Massachusetts.

As part of its 2019-2020 legislative agenda, ARL is advocating for standards that would mandate the creation of new state laws to protect pets. The bill, S. 114, H. 1774: An Act protecting the health and safety of puppies and kittens in cities and towns, is sponsored by Senator Harriett Chandler and Representative Linda Dean Campbell.

ARL has unfortunately seen a number of incidents involving animals in boarding kennels who were injured, sometimes fatally, due to insufficient facilities, staff training, or protocols.

“There are many fine boarding facilities throughout Massachusetts, but unfortunately due to a lack of state-wide standards and regulations, the Animal Rescue League of Boston recommends pet owners do their homework and ask the right questions to ensure their animal is safe,” said ARL President Mary Nee.

Before boarding your beloved pet, research as much as possible and keep these nine considerations in mind:

  1. See for Yourself. Can you see the kennels and common areas where your animal will be boarded? During your pet’s stay can you check on them remotely via webcam?
  2. Sound the Alarm. Does the facility have a written emergency response procedure in the event of fire, power outage, or natural disaster? Does the kennel have working fire and carbon monoxide detectors, sprinkler systems and a back-up power generator?
  3. License, Please. Does the kennel have a current operating license issued by a local city or town? According to the license, how many animals can be boarded at one time? How many animals are currently housed?
  4. In Case of a Medical Emergency. Are you contacted if your animals experiences an unexpected medical condition or injury? Is there a veterinarian on staff, or does the facility have a veterinarian on call? Do you sign a waiver giving permission to have your animal treated?
  5. TLC. What is the ratio of staff to animals? Is there 24-hour on-site supervision? If not, are animals monitored by video camera? What training or experience does the staff caring for animals have?
  6. Social Circle. Do dogs play together in common areas? Are these play groups supervised at all times? Are dogs grouped together by size and/or temperament? Can you choose to have your dog not participate in group activities?
  7. Infection Precautions. Does the facility require up-to-date vaccination records for all boarders? What documentation is required for your pet to be admitted?
  8. Feline Friends. Does the facility allow cats and are they separated from the sight and noise of dogs?
  9. Get it in Writing. Will the facility give you written documentation of their procedures or confirmation of any special requests for your pet?

Click here to download ARL’s “The Kennel-9” flyer.


ARL Rescue Conducts Tree Training

As the warm weather approaches, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Rescue Services expects to be busy, particularly when it comes getting cats out of trees. In order to ensure safety of both the staff and the animals they serve, training is essential.

For the past month, those new to technical climbing have spent hours getting familiar with knots, safety harnesses, throw lines and other climbing equipment.

This week the team had the opportunity to put the training to the test – under expert supervision, team members tackled their first tree on the grounds of ARL’s Dedham campus.

To see local news coverage of the training click here!

Weekly training will follow, as this type of climbing is precise and requires repetition, confidence and safety is paramount. Once this is achieved, agents will be ready to get into the field to assist these animals in need of help.

In 2018, ARL Rescue Services assisted more than 1,500 domestic animals and wildlife.

Help is on the way

If you see an animal in distress, contact ARL Rescue Services by calling 617-426-9170. Unfortunately ARL is unable to offer 24/7 services but will respond to an animal’s call for help as quickly as possible.


Nearly 50 Cats Removed from Metro Boston Home

While many of us were spending time with family during this past holiday weekend, our Law Enforcement Department was busy removing nearly 50 cats from a home, which has since been condemned due to deplorable and uninhabitable conditions.

When rescue agents entered the property, the air was suffocating and heavy with the odor of waste and decay. Trash, boxes and other items were piled from floor to ceiling and empty bowls and discarded cans of food littered the floors.

These conditions are a health hazard for animals and humans alike. Animals removed from these types of situations can have many issues including malnourishment, respiratory distress, matted fur and overgrown nails.

 

They're sick, frightened, and under-socialized – will you help?

They will need extraordinary medical treatment and likely weeks of constant interaction with staff and volunteers to recover – and thanks to your support, we will be able to provide them with everything they need.

In 2018, ARL removed more than 1,000 animals from overcrowding situations, and continues to see elevated numbers through the first four months of 2019.

Here are three things you can do today to help animals like the ones recovered this past weekend:

  1. Report Animal Cruelty. There are tell-tale signs of overcrowding and unhealthy living conditions for animals. If you identify any of the signs, please notify ARL Law Enforcement at cruelty@arlboston.org so we can investigate.
  2. Learn more about animal hoarding and animal overcrowding. This is a complex issue that often calls for deep compassion for animals and humans alike.
  3. Make a gift today. Donations support the investigation, rescue, and rehabilitation of animals that have suffered. With hoarding-type cases on the rise in the northeast, we need your support to help these animals overcome their trauma and find a safe, clean, happy home!

We cannot do this work alone – thank you for supporting animals when they need it most!

 

*PLEASE NOTE: These cats are not currently available for adoption and we ask that you please refrain from calling to inquire about them as these calls quickly overwhelm our phone lines. Thank you for your patience!