fbpx
Blog
199 Animals Removed From Lynnfield Home

Animal Rescue League of Boston and MSPCA-Angell partner in response to large-scale hoarding situation

MEDIA AVAIL: Monday, March 10, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm, ARLBoston’s Boston Shelter, 10 Chandler Street, Boston, MA

Boston, MA – At the end of February, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) partnered with MSPCA-Angell to remove 199 animals from a home in Lynnfield, Massachusetts.

In one of the largest hoarding situations the ARL has responded to in recent years, a wide range of species including dogs, cats, birds, and reptiles lived in unsanitary conditions, stacked in cages and crates in different areas of the home.  All of the animals were voluntarily surrendered to the ARL and MSPCA-Angell.

After the ARL’s Rescue Services team removed animals from the home, 60 came to the organization’s Boston shelter.  According to Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, vice president of animal welfare at the ARL and a member of the veterinary response team that provided medical care to the animals as they arrived at the shelter, many had serious health issues resulting from neglect.

arl-lynnfield-hoarding-dog-and-rescue

Danielle Genter, senior rescue technician at the ARL, comforts one of the dogs removed from a hoarding situation in Lynnfield, MA, at the end of February.

“When people suffer from the complex psychological conditions that lead to animal hoarding, they become overwhelmed with caring for all the animals they accumulate,” explains Dr. Smith-Blackmore.

“In hoarding situations, both the owner and the animals need help.  If you see something that suggests an animal hoarding situation, say something to your local authorities.”

The ARL’s veterinary and shelter staff mobilized a temporary isolation area for the cats requiring long-term medical treatment and found places for them at the Pat Brody Shelter for Cats in Lunenburg, where they will continue to receive rehabilitative care.  The ARL also asked Jabberwock Reptiles in Winchester for assistance taking in the reptiles rescued from the home, including sickly blue-tongued skinks and snakes.

The 6 dogs and 13 birds remaining at the ARL’s shelters continue to make progress in their recovery.  The Boston shelter has already begun to identify potential adopters for the shy, but very sweet dogs.

The ARL encourages anyone looking to help these animals and others like them recover from neglect to visit arlboston.org for more information.

About the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Founded in 1899, the ARL is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect.  In 2013, the ARL served over 14,000 individual animals through our shelters in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham, and our law enforcement, rescue, and veterinary services.  The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.

Media Avail
Monday, March 10
1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Animal Rescue League of Boston
Boston Animal Shelter
10 Chandler Street
Boston, MA

 ###

 

 


UPDATE: Animals Rescued from Unlicensed Traveling Petting Zoo

Animals Rescued on 2/7 in Ludlow Getting Ready to Go Home

Monica

Monica, available for adoption!

We have an exciting update on the animals taken in by the Animal Rescue League of Boston on February 7 from an unlicensed traveling petting zoo in Ludlow, Massachusetts!

Read the details of the Ludlow rescue.

In their prior circumstances, the animals did not have adequate shelter and their previous owner has been charged with 36 alleged counts of animal cruelty.  The ARL’s rescue services team assisted the MSPCA in providing emergency transport and care for 12 of the 35 animals involved in this case.

Since arriving at the barn at our Dedham shelter, the Ludlow 12 – including standard donkeys, miniature donkeys, goats, sheep, and Shetland ponies – received medical attention, proper nutrition, and a visit from the farrier, a specialist in equine hoof care.

All have made terrific progress in their recovery.  Those with overgrown hooves learned to walk properly again and all began going out into the livestock paddock on sunny days.

Thanks to special TLC from shelter staff, the personalities of these gentle creatures started to shine through as they relaxed in their new environment.  With their friendly and cuddly ways, the standard donkeys, FORREST (pictured below) and JENNY, in particular have endeared themselves to all their visitors!

Late last month, their previous owner officially surrendered them to the Animal Rescue League of Boston and potential adopters began asking about them almost immediately.

Ross, available for adoption!

Ross, available for adoption!

You can view the Ludlow animals currently available for adoption on our website.

If you would like to contribute to the costs of medical care and food for these animals and others like them, please click the button below to make a contribution today!

DONATE NOW

03-3-14 Forrest

Forrest loves posing for the camera!


5 Reasons Spay/Neuter is Good for Pets AND the People Who Love Them

Animal Rescue League of Boston to host #ARLAskaVet twitter chat on World Spay Day

Boston, MA – According to the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), a large portion of the companion animals coming into the organization’s shelters comes from unplanned litters of kittens and puppies.  National studies have also found that among pet owners who indicate their pets had at least one litter,  59% of cat owners and 38% of dog owners described the litter as “unintentional” or “accidental.” 

“Spay/neuter represents one of the most humane ways to lessen the number of homeless animals in our communities,” explains Dr. Edward Schettino, director of veterinary medical services at the ARL.  “The surgery comes with low risks and offers a variety of benefits to pets and the people who love them.”

01-11-14 Dr Schettino

In recognition of Spay/Neuter Awareness Month this February, the ARL encourages pet owners to consider the following five reasons to spay/neuter companion animals:

  1. Reduce the cost of pet ownership.  Particularly given the number of low-cost options available in Massachusetts, the cost of caring for an unplanned litter far outweighs the cost of having a pet spayed/neutered.
  2. Diminish nuisance behaviors.  Neutering resolves the vast majority of marking behaviors—even when a cat has a long-standing habit.  Howling in cats and excessive barking in dogs eases and even disappears after surgery.
  3. Prevent aggressive behaviors.  According to the National Canine Research Foundation, approximately 92% of fatal dog attacks involved male dogs, 94% of which were not neutered.  Neutering male dogs and cats reduces their urge to roam and fight with other males.
  4. Increase longevity.  The USA Today reports neutered male dogs live 18% longer than unneutered males, and spayed females live 23% longer than unspayed females.
  5. Improve health outlook.  Neutering males cats and dogs before six months of age prevents testicular cancer.  Spaying female cats and dogs before their first heat offers protection from uterine infections and breast cancer. 

35 Farm Animals Rescued from Unlicensed Traveling Petting Zoo

Animal Rescue League of Boston and MSPCA-Angell Work Together to Rescue Sickly Animals from the Cold

MEDIA AVAIL: Tuesday, February 11,2014 from 11 am – 12: 30 pm, Animal Rescue League of Boston’s Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center, 55 Anna’s Place, Dedham, MA.

Boston, MA – Over the weekend, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and MSPCA-Angell worked together to rescue 35 cold and emaciated animals from an unlicensed petting zoo in Ludlow, Massachusetts.

02-10-14 Ludlow Rescue Goat & Brian

ARL Rescue Services Manager Brian O’Connor carries one of 12 animals rescued from an unlicensed traveling petting zoo in Ludlow, MA, on Friday evening.

The ARL’s Rescue Services team brought 12 of the rescued animals, including mini-donkeys, donkeys, ponies, sheep, and goats, to the organization’s Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center for immediate care. The MSPCA-Angell’s Law Enforcement department transported the more severely emaciated and sickly animals including pigs and alpacas to the organization’s Nevins Farm facility.

On Monday, the MSPCA-Angell’s Law Enforcement department charged the animal’s owner Dean Manual of Ludlow with multiple counts of animal cruelty. Manual, 43, faces up to 36 counts of animal cruelty with additional pending charges for assaulting a law enforcement officer and resisting arrest.

As the ARL and MSPCA-Angell tended to the animals on Friday evening in Ludlow, many neighbors expressed concern for the health of the animals and asked for information about contributing to their care.

Since their arrival, the animals at the ARL’s Dedham facility have received proper hydration, nutrition, and veterinary care. Animal care staff report all 12 continue to rest and recover from living in cruel conditions.

About the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Founded in 1899, the ARL is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect. The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.

About the MSPCA-Angell

The MSPCA-Angell is a national and international leader in animal protection and veterinary medicine and provides direct hands-on care for thousands of animals each year. Founded in 1868, it is the second-oldest humane society in the United States. Services include animal protection and adoption, advocacy, humane education, law enforcement, and world-class veterinary care. The MSPCA-Angell is a private, non-profit organization. It does not receive any government funding nor is it funded or operated by any national humane organization. The MSPCA-Angell relies solely on the support and contributions from individuals who care about animals.

Media Avail
Tuesday, February 11, 2014
11 am – 12: 30 pm
Animal Rescue League of Boston
Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center
55 Anna’s Place
Dedham, MA

 


BREAKING NEWS: 35 Animals Rescued from Unlicensed Traveling Petting Zoo

ARL & MSPCA-Angell Combine Efforts to Rescue Cold, Sickly Animals

02-10-14 Ludlow Rescue PonyOn Friday, February 7, the Animal Rescue League of Boston and MSPCA-Angell joined forces to rescue 35 cold and emaciated animals from an unlicensed traveling petting zoo in Ludlow, Massachusetts.

According to the MSPCA, the majority of animals were underwieght.

The ARL’s Rescue Services team brought 12 of the rescued animals, including mini-donkeys, donkeys, ponies, sheep, and goats, to the organization’s Dedham Shelter for immediate care. The MSPCA-Angell’s Law Enforcement department transported the more severely emaciated and sickly animals including pigs and alpacas to the organization’s Nevins Farm facility.

Today, the MSPCA-Angell’s Law Enforcement department charged the animal’s owner Dean Manual of Ludlow with multiple counts of animal cruelty. Manual, 43, faces up to 36 counts of animal cruelty with additional pending charges for assaulting a law enforcement officer and resisting arrest.

02-10-14 Ludlow Rescue Mini Donkey

According staff at the Dedham shelter, the Ludlow 12 are settling in, though they have a long road to recovery ahead.  Some may require extensive and costly veterinary exams.

Help these animals and others like them as they recover from cruel living conditions. Click the button below to make a contribution today!

DONATE NOW

02-10-14 Ludlow Rescue Goat & Brian

Your donations are GREATLY appreciated. 


Your Winter Pet Health Questions, Answered

Dr. Schettino’s Answers to Pet Health Questions from ARL’s Twitter Chat

01-11-14 Dr SchettinoThank you to all who participated in and submitted questions to ARL’s Twitter chat with the ARL’s President & CEO, Edward Schettino, DVM, PhD, CAWA.

Introduction: @ARLBostonRescue: Hi everyone. Our Winter #PetHealth Twitter chat starts NOW! #ARLAskaVet

Q:@pawspluspals: @ARLBostonRescue #ARLAskaVet Should dogs always wear doggie boots/booties when they go walking on snow/ice?
A:
Dr.Schettino: Doggie boots help protect your companion’s pads from salt and ice so depending on location they can be helpful. #ARLAskaVet
A: however, some dogs may not like them #ARLAskaVet

Q: @ubergirl4: My cats shed a lot during the winter and get indigestion from hairballs. What should I give them to help?” #ARLAskaVet
A:
You should give them love and affection by grooming them on a regular basis. This will help reduce shedding! #ARLAskaVet 

Q: @Dobrska: How do I remove sap from my pet’s fur? #ARLAskaVet
A: The best way to remove sap is to use some type of cooking oil (Olive oil ..) and gently rub into the sap. #ARLAskaVet
A: ‏
Once the sap is lose you then can use a liquid dishwashing detergent to wash out the oil. Problem solved!! #ARLAskaVet

Q: Do dogs need flea/tick treatment in the winter if they rarely interact with other dogs?A: Yes! Fleas can live inside during the winter months. Year round protection is very important. #ARLAskaVet
A: And depending on the temperature outside and your location … ticks can still be a nuisance during the winter months. #ARLAskaVet
Q: @MRegan102205: #arlaskavet – If someone has an indoor/outdoor cat, when is it too cold for the cat to remain outside?” 
A: When the temperature starts to dip below freezing you need to be very careful with outdoor pets. #ARLAskaVet
A: You need to keep a careful eye on your cat when they are outside. They will let you know when it is too cold. #ARLAskaVet
A: If it is too cold for you … your cat is probably cold as well! Be very careful and monitor your cat carefully. #ARLAskaVet

Q: What is the longest a pet should be outside when the temperature is below 32F? #ARLAskaVet 
A: Some pets love the cold weather and can spend hours outside in the snow and cold. However, you need to keep a watchful eye #ARLAskaVet
A: on your pet and when they show signs of cold: holding up their paws, shivering and becoming less active #ARLAskaVet


Q: @BostonDailyNews: Can animals get frostbite? #ARLAskaVet #Boston cc:@ARLDrS
A: Yes! Usually on their paw pads, the tip of the tail and the margins of the ears. #ARLAskaVet #Boston

Q: Cats seem to eat plants frequently during the winter. Why and is this a cause for concern? #ARLAskaVet #Boston cc:@ARLDrS
A: You are either home more often or you have moved your plants inside for the winter months. #ARLAskaVet #Boston
A: It is vital that you are familiar with what type of houseplants you have and their degree of toxicity! #ARLAskaVet #Boston

Q: @AlyssaKane: @ARLBostonRescue @ARLDrS Should I vaccinate my dog for lepto and canine flu? I’m not sure if I should be worried about these illnesses #ARLAskaVet
A: It all depends on the lifestyle of your dog. You should have this conversation with your local veterinarian.

Q: @CamillaRFox: @ARLBostonRescue @ARLDrS #ARLAskaVet Any winter exercise tips for large dog whose arthritis lets him swim, but little else?
A: You can find a canine physical therapist who generally have underwater treadmills that you can use.

Q: @norwoodsworld:@ARLBostonRescue @ARLDrS what’s the difference between kennel cough and canine flu? #ARLAskaVet
A: Great tweet! They both have similar symptoms but are very different – canine flu generally contd #ARLAskaVet
A: … is more severe. You should speak with your regular veterinarian regarding risks of each. #ARLAskaVet
Q: When should a dog wear a coat? #ARLAskaVet
A: It all depends on the dog. If you feel your dog is uncomfortable in the cold, feel free to try a warm winter coat.
A: Generally dogs lose heat through their paws, ears and respiratory tract.

Puppy Doe Update: What You Can Do to Prevent Future Cases of Animal Cruelty

Puppy Doe’s call to action: see something, say something

In addition to continuing to support the on-going investigation and prosecution of the Puppy Doe case, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) has issued a call to action to the public to report suspected animal abuse to local authorities.

All too often, animal cruelty remains undiscovered. By many estimates, 4 out of 5 cases remain concealed, leaving animals to suffer in silence. Yet we can all give a voice to victims of animal cruelty if when we see something, we say something.

In the words of ARL’s president Mary Nee, “public awareness and people speaking up will be our strongest defense against future cases of animal cruelty.”

In the months since the news about her case first broke, many individuals and organizations have taken action related to Puppy Doe at their own initiative. We respect the right of individuals and businesses to express and pursue their ideas, whether it’s writing a book, selling a product, or producing a video. The ARL, however, has no involvement with any of these projects.

When we’re asked what people can do to channel the grief, sadness, and rage they feel about what happened to Puppy Doe, we suggest supporting an animal welfare organization.

Donate, volunteer, adopt a shelter pet….help them further the work they’re doing to help animals in need.

And most importantly, speak up and report suspicions of animal cruelty, neglect, and abuse to local authorities. If when you see something, you say something, you can make a tremendous difference.

Learn more about the signs of animal abuse and visit arlboston.org/take-action for more on what you can do to help animals recover from cruelty and neglect.

 


Winter Playtime Tips for You and Your Dog

Protect Your Pup from the Winter Weather

Winter is upon us and with it comes snow and freezing weather.  Just as people need to keep active, healthy, and—of course—warm in during these colder months, dogs need extra help as well.

To protect your pup in winter weather….

Keep your dog on leash in the snow and ice.  Dogs can easily lose their scent in the snow, so never let your dog off-leash during a snowstorm, or when there’s ice or snow on the ground.  If you’re walking near “frozen” ponds, lakes, or streams, remember ice is not always uniformly thick or stable, and your pup could fall through into frigid water if he or she is allowed to explore off-leash.

Wipe your dog’s paws AND stomach when he’s been outside in the snow or sleet. Sidewalks are often treated with rock salt, antifreeze, and other dangerous chemicals. Not only are these bad for your pet’s paws, but if ingested these chemicals are often poisonous. Make sure your pet does not lick his paws or stomach before you’ve wiped them down.

Prepare your pup for the elements. If your dog typically has a longer coat, let it grow for the winter. A longer coat provides more warmth and protection from colder temperatures. If your dog has a short coat, make sure to get him a coat or a sweater.  Just like you, he’ll enjoy the outdoors much more if he isn’t shivering.

Don’t leave your pet alone in a car during cold weather. Many dogs love a car ride to their favorite park or play area, just remember the warm temperatures inside your vehicle don’t stick around for very long once the engine is off.  As the thermometer plummets, your car can act like a refrigerator and your dog can freeze to death.

Pay attention to protein.  If your dog spends a lot of time outside, playing, running, or going for long walks, make sure he’s getting enough protein. Among other benefits, protein helps maintain a healthy coat.  And a coat in excellent condition will keep him nice and warm while he frolics in the snow!

While it’s not always easy to get excited about going outside in the freezing cold, nothing beats the winter blues like watching your dog plow through the fluffy stuff.   If your dog likes to play in the snow, go ahead and join him!

There’s probably nothing that he’d like better than to have his best friend (that’s you) play fetch in the snow or just run around with him—it’s great exercise and bonding for you both.

12-31 Wintertime Snow Play Tips_Photo

Photo: The Ski Channel

For more helpful tips about dog and cat health and behavior, visit arlboston.org/helpfultips


Rikki’s Story: Unique Dog Finds Best Friend

Not Every Pet is Perfect, But Every Pet Deserves the Perfect Home!

Several months ago, a little dog named Rikki arrived at our Dedham Adoption Center.  Though she had a deformity in her front legs, she certainly didn’t act like she did.  She moved and played, and was especially sweet.

And that’s what the family that adopted Rikki saw—an affectionate and playful pup who just thought she was like every other dog.

Here at the Animal Rescue League of Boston we treat every animal as an individual and we believe that every pet deserves a chance to experience love and human companionship. This video of Rikki and her person, Katherine, will inspire you – we can all learn something from this wise little girl!

Share this video with your friends, family, and all of your social networks.  Let’s make it go viral! It’s beautifully done and, above all else, a wonderfully happy story!

Please make a donation today to help animals like Rikki find the perfect match all year long.

Thank you to local videographers Twin Lens Media for producing this video of Rikki and Katherine.  And thank you t0 Rikki’s family for allowing us to share her story.


Animal Rescue League of Boston Shares Happy Update on Oliver Twist

Severely emaciated puppy discovered by kind FedEx driver is home for holidays

Boston, MA – This past April, a kind FedEx driver named Jeff called the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) after spotting a severely emaciated puppy shivering in the cold and wandering the streets along his delivery route.  The ARL’s Rescue Services Team immediately responded to the call, and were stunned by what they found.

“We could see his bones jutting through his skin,” describes Danielle Genter, senior rescue technician at the ARL. “When we found him, he just stumbled over to us.”

oliver4

When the ARL’s Rescue Service Team first saw Oliver Twist, they were stunned by his severely emaciated condition.

At the ARL’s Boston adoption center, the frail little pup received immediate medical attention along with the name Oliver Twist. On the Purina body condition scale a score of “9” is considered obese and “1” is extremely lean; Oliver scored less than 1. He was also diagnosed with a bacterial infection.

Over the next few weeks, Oliver’s condition stabilized. He was placed on a progressive re-feeding schedule and soon began to eat on his own. ARL veterinarians checked him daily to ensure that he was gaining the expected amount of weight and treated his infection. He also received lots of love and attention from adoption center staff.

The ARL’s Center for Animal Protection put out requests for information to identify who so severely neglected Oliver. To date, however, a suspect has not been found.

With special care and attention, Oliver was ready for a home just a few weeks after his rescue.   After seeing Oliver’ story on the news, Billie Jean Nebesky and her daughter felt an instant connection with him. “We knew he needed us and we needed him,” said Nebesky.

They adopted him at the end of April and happily report that today, he has made himself completely at home for the holidays.

Oliver twist with stick in new home

Today, Oliver Twist is happy and healthy. He especially loves to fetch sticks in the woods near his home.

“If we sit down in a chair, Oliver will immediately join you and cuddle,” smiles his new mom. “He clearly knows he is part of our family.”

About the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Founded in 1899, the Animal Rescue League of Boston is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect. The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.
At the beginning of December, the ARL launched “Home for the Holidays,” a month-long community outreach campaign to encourage adoption and support for shelter animals. By featuring stories of animals rescued from cruel conditions, now recovered and living happy lives, as well as animals available for adoption, the ARL hopes to find more animals a home this holiday season.