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Puppy Doe Update: Date Set for Suspect’s Next Court Appearance

Norfolk County District Attorney Michael Morrissey announced the arraignment of the suspect in the Puppy Doe abuse case  is scheduled for December 19 at 2 pm in Norfolk Superior Court.

Late last week, the Norfolk County Grand Jury handed down 12 indictments for animal abuse and one indictment for misleading police in the on-going investigation of the suspect.  Those indictments moved the case from Quincy District Court to Norfolk Superior Court.

As reported on Boston.com, the move from District to Superior Court means that if convicted, the suspect could face a sentence of up to 5 years per count in state prison.  District Court can only impose a maximum sentence of two and half years in a county House of Correction.

Like you, we will continue to closely follow criminal proceedings against the suspect.   To learn more about what you can do to prevent future case of animal abuse, visit arlboston.org/take-action.


Puppy Doe Update: Indictments Issued By Grand Jury

Yesterday, Norfolk County District Attorney Michael Morrissey announced the Norfolk County Grand Jury handed down 12 indictments for animal abuse and one indictment for misleading police in the on-going investigation of the suspect in the Puppy Doe case.

“Today’s indictments move the existing case from the Quincy District Court to the Norfolk Superior Court,” District Attorney Morrissey also reported.

In Massachusetts, a District Court can only impose  a maximum sentence of two and a half years in a county House of Correction.  Previously, the District Attorney’s Office indicated each count of animal abuse carries a five-year prison term.

“Only a justice of the Superior Court can order longer terms to be served in a State Prison,” District Attorney Morrissey explained.

 Morrissey said that the suspect’s arraignment on these indictments in Norfolk Superior Court has not yet been scheduled, but that he expects it to be set before December 20, when the defendant would otherwise return to the Quincy District Court. “At the time of the Superior Court arraignment, the District Court case will be withdrawn as superseded.”

The suspect plead not guilty to multiple counts of animal cruelty and one count of misleading police investigators at his arraignment in late October in Quincy District Court.   At the arraignment, Judge Mark S. Coven ordered the suspect held on $500,000 cash bail.

Like you, we will continue to closely follow criminal proceedings against the suspect.   To learn more about what you can do to prevent future case of animal abuse, visit arlboston.org/take-action.


Puppy Doe Update: Next Court Date Continued to 12/20

The Norfolk County District Attorney’s office announced that Quincy District Court has issued a continuance in the case of Puppy Doe, the young adult female dog found severely injured and starved near a park in  Quincy.   The Court continued proceeding to December 20.

Earlier this month, the suspect in the case was charged with 11 counts of animal cruelty.  He remains incarcerated as the investigation in the case continues.

Were it not for people expressing their concerns to authorities about the injuries Puppy Doe sustained, the world might never have known about one of the worst cases of animal abuse anyone at the ARL has ever seen.

Learn more about how you can give a voice to victims of animal cruelty by visiting arlboston.org/take-action

11-6 See something say something


How to Identify Signs of Animal Abuse

Identifying Potential Pet Abuse

We all have a role to play in prevention. All too often, animal cruelty remains undiscovered. By many estimates, 4 out of 5 cases remain concealed, leaving animals to suffer in silence.

Recognizing and reporting animal abuse is especially important, due to the link between animal abuse and domestic violence. A correlation between animal abuse, family violence, and other forms of community violence has been established.

11-13 Signs of Animal AbuseTake note of the following:

  • If a person keeps changing the story about their pet’s history
  • Listen to children’s responses to questions about their pets
  • Ask about other household pets
  • Observe how family members interact with each other
  • Observe how an animal acts around certain family members

Warning signs that could raise suspicion a.k.a. red flags:

  • Pets with chronic injuries or medical conditions that go untreated
  • Other injuries that are healing, in addition to a new injury
  • Pet owners who use the services of several veterinarians
  • Pet owners who constantly have new puppies or kittens, but not adult or aging pets
  • Injuries attributed to unknown causes, i.e. someone tells you that their pet has many accidental injuries
  • Multiple injured animals at the same house

Suspect animal cruelty, neglect, or abuse? Call (617) 426-9170 x110 or email cruelty@arlboston.org.

Your calls are confidential; however we will require some information to file a valid police report.

Not sure if it’s animal cruelty? Learn the 7 warning signs.

*Portions of this blog post have been reposted from an article called How to Recognize Animal Abuse and What to do About it by the Veterinary Team Brief by Lisa Bourazak, DVM, MPT, Kate Creevy DVM, MS, DACVIM, and Karen Cornell DVM, PhD, DACVS.


Link Between Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence

Studies Show a Correlation Between Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence

In light of the recent Puppy Doe case, we’re discussing the link between animal abuse and domestic violence and why it’s important to say something if you see something.

When you report animal abuse, you are likely helping other members of the family in addition to the animal.

*For example, 71% of women seeking shelter at a safe house for battered partners who reported owning a pet reported that their partner had threatened and/or actually hurt or killed one or more of their pets, although it was not easy for them to discuss. In one study, 26 women who had been the subjects of domestic violence reported that their male partners had also verbally and/or physically abused the household pet(s), yet the majority of the women were unwilling to discuss it with their veterinarian.3

Other studies have shown that children who live in violent households are more likely to be cruel to animals. In a survey of 860 college students regarding family violence and animal abuse, 60% of students who reported witnessing or perpetrating animal cruelty as a child also reported experiences with child maltreatment or domestic violence.

DEFINING ABUSE

Animal cruelty, abuse, and neglect are defined differently, according to the intent of the perpetrator. According to the AVMA

  • Animal cruelty is any deliberate act that, by intention or neglect, causes an animal unnecessary pain or suffering, including inflicting pain on an animal for the abuser’s enjoyment or amusement.
  • Animal abuse is the maltreatment of an animal regardless of the perpetrator’s intent, motivation, or mental condition. The perpetrator’s deliberate intent distinguishes cruelty from abuse.
  • Animal neglect is defined as the failure to provide an animal sufficient water, food, shelter, and/or veterinary care; lack of grooming; and lack of sanitation. These failures may be the result of ignorance, poverty, or other extenuating circumstances. This is the most commonly investigated situation.

*This blog post has been reposted from an article called How to Recognize Animal Abuse and What to do About it by the Veterinary Team Brief by Lisa Bourazak, DVM, MPT, Kate Creevy DVM, MS, DACVIM, and Karen Cornell DVM, PhD, DACVS.


Middleboro Puppies Update: Getting Stronger Every Day

They’re Playing Through the Day and Sleeping Through the Night

We’ve promised to give you regular updates on the Middleboro Puppies who were rescued during a drug and weapons raid on a home in Middleboro, MA back on October 3, so here’s a little something on how they’re doing. They’ve been in the care of ARL foster parents for almost a month now and are making enormous progress. One of our foster parents shared this little tidbit about her foster pups whom she has lovingly named Franny and Ollie.

Franny is much smaller than her brother…but she is very rambunctious and usually in charge.  She likes to chat (and has the cutest little bark) and she also likes to follow us everywhere and cuddle up on your lap the minute you sit down.  She loves food and she loves playing hard and napping hard with her brother.

Ollie is just the sweetest puppy.  His beautiful eyes just melt your heart.  He is very gentle and calm for a puppy (I don’t think that we have ever heard him bark) and he is SO interested in people…and cats.  He is also very smart…very good with the food puzzles.

They both sleep through the night very well.  They love to play with sticks and chase each other in circles in our backyard. It’s amazing in three weeks how much they have grown and thrived from the condition they were in when rescued. It really makes Jon and I grateful for all the components of the League that make outcomes like this possible. They are amazing little pups that are going to make wonderful companions and bring immense joy to their future adopters!” ~ Amelia Hughes

When the puppies arrived at the ARL they were in terrible condition. All the the puppies were emaciated and dehydrated, covered in feces and riddled with worms. You can imagine how grateful we are to have a network of foster parents who care for these little guys and gals until they are healthy and strong enough to be adopted. The puppies still have a way to go and are not yet available for adoption, but we’ll let you know as soon as they are! Read their story.

Franny and Ollie play outside in the leaves.

Franny and Ollie play outside in the leaves in their adorable sweaters. Photo Credit: Amelia Hughes


PUPPY DOE UPDATE: Suspect Faces 11 Counts of Animal Cruelty

ARL will continue to support what remains an active investigation

The Quincy Police Department announced an arrest in the Puppy Doe abuse case and today the suspect was charged with 11 counts of animal cruelty in Quincy District Court.

Norfolk County District Attorney Michael Morrissey, Quincy Chief of Police Paul Keenan, and ARL president Mary Nee joined together for a press conference immediately following today’s court proceedings.


PUPPY DOE UPDATE: Quincy Police Department Announces Arrest of Suspect

Police to Host Press Conference Following Suspect’s Arraignment Tuesday Morning

At a press briefing this afternoon, Quincy Police Chief Paul Keenan announced an arrest in the case of Puppy Doe, the young adult female dog found tortured, starved, and dumped near a park.

From the very beginning of the investigation into Puppy Doe’s abuse, we wanted the person responsible for this heinous crime to be found and brought to justice as quickly as possible.  The Quincy Police Department and the District Attorney shared our sense of urgency in identifying the perpetrator, and we want to thank both organizations for their diligence and continuous hard work in pursuit of justice for Puppy Doe.

For the safety of people and animals in our community, we feel a tremendous sense of relief that a suspect is now in custody.

The arrest comes after many weeks of dedicated and intensive investigation by the Quincy Police Department.  We look forward to attending the press conference tomorrow morning at Quincy Police Department headquarters following the arraignment of the suspect to share more details of the investigation.


UPDATE: Middleboro Puppies Getting Stronger in Foster Care

Puppies Are Receiving Lots of TLC in Foster Care

One of our foster parents sent this picture of her two foster pups! How adorable are they? Photo: Amelia Hughes

A foster parent sent this picture of her two foster pups! Aren’t they just the cutest?
Photo: Amelia Hughes

We are happy to report that the puppies seized during a drug and weapons raid in Middleboro, MA on October 2 are all making excellent progress!

In spite of their rough start on life, these little guys and gals are snugly, playful, and sweet-as-can-be. The thirteen puppies have been sent to all three of our adoption centers are currently living with foster families in an environment where they can socialize with people and other dogs and get the TLC they so desperately need.

We’d like to thank all of our foster parents who are taking such excellent care of the puppies until they are healthy and strong enough to be available for adoption!

Please note that the puppies are NOT yet available for adoption, but we’ll keep you poster on their story and let you know as soon as they’re at our shelters.

Watch the video below from the Cape Cod Times for more about the four puppies that are down on Cape Cod.


Puppy Doe Update 10/16

Puppy Doe Investigation Making Progress

Work continues to identify who severely abused Puppy Doe, a young adult female dog dumped in a quiet neighborhood in Quincy, Massachusetts.

Norfolk County District Attorney Michael W. Morrissey and the Quincy Police Department are the only organizations releasing official details on the investigation.  To update the public on the progress of the investigation , the District Attorney released the following statement last week:

On behalf of my office, the Quincy Police Department, and the Animal Rescue League of Boston, I am grateful for the hundreds of calls and tips that have been forthcoming in the criminal investigation into the torture of Puppy Doe. We have been inundated with tips, concerns and offers of assistance from around the world.

As Paul Keenan, Quincy Police Chief, has said, “Please be assured that we are following up with each tip received even those that have taken us out of state.”

Many calls have been received requesting updated information on the status and progress of the investigation. As with all criminal investigations, we are unable to discuss publically the specifics of this very active and ongoing investigation. To do so would not only compromise the investigation, but would also violate the ethical rules to which this office is bound. The information we have received to date from the public has been invaluable in guiding our actions through the course of the investigation.

10-16 Puppy Doe Update Photo rest in peacePlease be assured that these three agencies are working in concert to identify and hold accountable the person or persons responsible for the torture of Puppy Doe. It is highly unlikely that this level of sadistic cruelty could be shown to one animal and not be part of a pattern involving other animals or perhaps vulnerable people.

Anyone with information material to the criminal investigation regarding Puppy Doe is encouraged to contact the Animal Rescue League of Boston, Law Enforcement Department at 617-226-5610, email them at cruelty@arlboston.org, or call Quincy Police Detective Thomas Pepdjonovich at 617-745-5774.

We will continue to post updates on the Puppy Doe case as we receive them from the District Attorney.