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Bunnies are Not Just for Easter. They’re for Life!

Bunnies and Easter go hand-in-hand, but when deciding on giving a rabbit as an Easter gift, consider the chocolate, candy and stuffed animal toy kind first, and if you’re really serious, then think about adopting a rabbit. Adding a real, live rabbit to your family should be a well thought-out decision.

Here’s what you should know about rabbits:

  • They should live indoors.
  • They have a lifespan of about 10 years.
  • Rabbits are sensitive and can be stressed out by small children.
  • They like to chew on cords and furniture, so your home must be bunny-proofed.
  • Rabbits should be neutered or spayed or they will mark your house.
  • They make great apartment pets.

If you are thinking about adopting a rabbit this Easter remember to ask yourself the question, ‘Was I interested in a rabbit before Spring or am I getting caught up by the holiday fever?’ It can be an exciting surprise to add one to your family at Easter time as long as you have considered the commitment and the care that will last long after you’ve devoured your last Cadbury Crème Egg!


Lt. Borgal on the Link Between Animal Cruelty and Community Violence [VIDEO]

As a reminder that April is Prevention of Cruelty to Animals month, today we’re sharing a video featuring Lt. Alan Borgal, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Director of Law Enforcement. Lt. Borgal emphasizes the link between cruelty to animals and family and community violence and encourages you to contact local authorities if you suspect animal cruelty or neglect. Remember YOU can give a voice to the victims of animal cruelty, if when you see something, you say something!

A very special thanks to GreatGrandPaws for producing the video for us!

Not sure if it’s animal cruelty? Learn the 7 warning signs.


7 Warning Signs of Potential Animal Cruelty

Subtle indications that may indicate an animal is at risk

While most of us recognize that punching, kicking, burning, choking, or hitting an animal with an object are acts of animal cruelty, there are also several more subtle warning signs of animal cruelty to watch for that could indicate mistreatment, neglect, or abuse:

    1. Howling or barking for a sustained period of time or hearing an animal cry in pain with higher pitched, more persistent vocal sounds than usual.
    2. Singed, matted, chronically or excessively dirty hair or fur.
    3. Wounds, unusual scars, hair loss, frequent limping often on different legs, or signs of improper nutrition such as weight loss or prominent visible ribs.
    4. Animals kept caged or tied with little room to move for long periods of time or without regular interaction with people
    5. Lack of protection from the weather or fece- or debris-strewn living areas for animals.
    6. Collars, leashes, or halters so tight they visibly dig into the animal’s face or neck.
    7. A large number of animals coming or going from a property.

If you know or suspect animal cruelty, report concerns to your local authorities.  Learn more about how you can prevent animal cruelty at arlboston.org/take-action


Turtle’s Story: From Bait Dog to Therapy Dog and Lobbyist

National Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month Starts Today

Turtle in the place where she was discovered.

Turtle in the place where she was discovered.

April is Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month and we’d like to share with you the story of a dog who exemplifies how much reporting concerns of animal abuse, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect to local authorities truly impacts the lives of animals in our communities.

Learn about the different types of “blood sports” and what you can do to help stop them.

On the night of December 14, 2009, the Animal Rescue League of Boston responded to a call about an injured dog in Hyde Park. Had someone not called, “Turtle” probably would not have made it through the night.

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) found an emaciated and gravely wounded female pitbull-type dog – who we named Turtle because she was discovered near Turtle Pond Parkway – lying curled up and motionless in the cold. She was extremely weak and covered with scars and open sores.

ARL’s Field Services team immediately determined that Turtle’s injuries were consistent with her being used as a “bait dog” to train fighting dogs. Bait dogs are commonly discarded after a life of cruel and inhumane treatment, and she had obviously been left for dead.

Turtle at Tufts

Turtle at Tufts

Turtle was transported to Tufts Veterinary Emergency Treatments & Specialties where veterinarians were able to stabilize her condition. She successfully underwent surgery to close numerous bite wounds and she received treatment for broken teeth, intestinal parasites, fleas and nutritional deficiencies. Once she recovered from her surgery she faced a long and arduous period of physical and behavioral rehabilitation at the ARL.

After months spent in the care of the ARL’s foster program, Turtle became a completely different dog. She was soon after adopted by her attending veterinarian from the evening she was found, Dr. April Paul. from Tufts who helped save her life.

Today, Turtle lives a happy, healthy life, spending much of her time visiting schools and hospitals as a therapy dog and lobbying for animals and encouraging people to give a voice to victims of animal cruelty at the Massachusetts State House.

Turtle after her recovery, bringing joy to children.

Turtle after her recovery, bringing joy to children.

3 Signs a Dog May Be Being Used for Dog Fighting

  1. Dogs kept on short heavy chains or tethered to makeshift dog houses
  2. Several crates, tethering devices, and specialized aerobic training equipment such as treadmills kept in basements and sheds
  3. Dogs with lots of scaring around the face, neck, front legs and chest

Learn more about how you can give a voice to the victims of animal cruelty: arlboston.org/take-action


Invest in Animals This Tax Season

Donate on Line 32f of Your Massachusetts Tax Form!

If you need something to look forward to this tax season, consider this: cat and dog together with text

By donating on line 32f of your Massachusetts tax form, you are making a difference in the lives of animals in our state.

Your donation to the Massachusetts Homeless Animal Prevention and Care Fund will help the state’s most vulnerable animals: those who are homeless and those who are owned by families unable to afford to spay/neuter their pets.

Created by Chapter 193 of the Acts of 2012, the Homeless Animal Prevention and Care Fund will help animals by reducing the number of homeless cats and dogs and will provide training to animal control officers.


NEWS: 199 Animals Taken from Lynnfield Hoarding House

ARL helping rescued animals recover from neglect and find new homes

At the end of February, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) partnered with MSPCA-Angell to remove 199 animals from a home in Lynnfield, Massachusetts.

In one of the largest hoarding situations the ARL has responded to in recent years, a wide range of species including dogs, cats, birds, and reptiles lived in unsanitary conditions, stacked in cages and crates in different areas of the home.  All of the animals were voluntarily surrendered to the ARL and MSPCA-Angell.

After the ARL’s Rescue Services team removed animals from the home, the team brought 60 to our Boston shelter for emergency medical care.  According to Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, vice president of animal welfare at the ARL, many of the animals had serious health issues resulting from neglect.

“When people suffer from the complex psychological conditions that lead to animal hoarding, they become overwhelmed with caring for all the animals they accumulate,” explains Dr. Smith-Blackmore.

“In hoarding situations, both the owner and the animals need help.  If you see something that suggests an animal hoarding situation, say something to your local authorities.”

Working together, our veterinary and shelter staff mobilized a temporary isolation area for the cats requiring long-term medical treatment and found places for them at the Pat Brody Shelter for Cats in Lunenburg, where they will continue to receive rehabilitative care.  The ARL also asked Jabberwock Reptiles in Winchester, for assistance taking in the reptiles recovered from the home, including sickly blue-tongued skinks and snakes.

The 6 dogs and 13 birds remaining at the ARL’s shelters continue to make progress in their recovery.  Broadway Dog Spa in South Boston generously donated grooming services and the Boston shelter has already begun to identify potential adopters for the shy, but very sweet dogs.

All three of our shelters have taken in the birds.  Staff members are getting to know their unique personalities, while providing proper nutrition and care.

If you would like to help these animals and others like them recover from neglect, click the green button below to make a donation.

Donate Now

 

03-6 Lynnfield Rescue Danielle & Dog

Danielle Genter, senior rescue technician at the ARL, comforts one of the dogs removed from a hoarding situation in Lynnfield, MA, at the end of February.

03-6 Lynnfield Rescue Dog Front

The coats of the dogs were so overgrown that most of them could barely see.

03-6 Lynnfield Rescue Dog Back

It appears that this dog, removed from the Lynnfield home, was living in very unsanitary conditions. His coat was filthy.

 

 


199 Animals Removed From Lynnfield Home

Animal Rescue League of Boston and MSPCA-Angell partner in response to large-scale hoarding situation

MEDIA AVAIL: Monday, March 10, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm, ARLBoston’s Boston Shelter, 10 Chandler Street, Boston, MA

Boston, MA – At the end of February, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) partnered with MSPCA-Angell to remove 199 animals from a home in Lynnfield, Massachusetts.

In one of the largest hoarding situations the ARL has responded to in recent years, a wide range of species including dogs, cats, birds, and reptiles lived in unsanitary conditions, stacked in cages and crates in different areas of the home.  All of the animals were voluntarily surrendered to the ARL and MSPCA-Angell.

After the ARL’s Rescue Services team removed animals from the home, 60 came to the organization’s Boston shelter.  According to Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, vice president of animal welfare at the ARL and a member of the veterinary response team that provided medical care to the animals as they arrived at the shelter, many had serious health issues resulting from neglect.

arl-lynnfield-hoarding-dog-and-rescue

Danielle Genter, senior rescue technician at the ARL, comforts one of the dogs removed from a hoarding situation in Lynnfield, MA, at the end of February.

“When people suffer from the complex psychological conditions that lead to animal hoarding, they become overwhelmed with caring for all the animals they accumulate,” explains Dr. Smith-Blackmore.

“In hoarding situations, both the owner and the animals need help.  If you see something that suggests an animal hoarding situation, say something to your local authorities.”

The ARL’s veterinary and shelter staff mobilized a temporary isolation area for the cats requiring long-term medical treatment and found places for them at the Pat Brody Shelter for Cats in Lunenburg, where they will continue to receive rehabilitative care.  The ARL also asked Jabberwock Reptiles in Winchester for assistance taking in the reptiles rescued from the home, including sickly blue-tongued skinks and snakes.

The 6 dogs and 13 birds remaining at the ARL’s shelters continue to make progress in their recovery.  The Boston shelter has already begun to identify potential adopters for the shy, but very sweet dogs.

The ARL encourages anyone looking to help these animals and others like them recover from neglect to visit arlboston.org for more information.

About the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Founded in 1899, the ARL is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect.  In 2013, the ARL served over 14,000 individual animals through our shelters in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham, and our law enforcement, rescue, and veterinary services.  The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.

Media Avail
Monday, March 10
1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Animal Rescue League of Boston
Boston Animal Shelter
10 Chandler Street
Boston, MA

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UPDATE: Animals Rescued from Unlicensed Traveling Petting Zoo

Animals Rescued on 2/7 in Ludlow Getting Ready to Go Home

Monica

Monica, available for adoption!

We have an exciting update on the animals taken in by the Animal Rescue League of Boston on February 7 from an unlicensed traveling petting zoo in Ludlow, Massachusetts!

Read the details of the Ludlow rescue.

In their prior circumstances, the animals did not have adequate shelter and their previous owner has been charged with 36 alleged counts of animal cruelty.  The ARL’s rescue services team assisted the MSPCA in providing emergency transport and care for 12 of the 35 animals involved in this case.

Since arriving at the barn at our Dedham shelter, the Ludlow 12 – including standard donkeys, miniature donkeys, goats, sheep, and Shetland ponies – received medical attention, proper nutrition, and a visit from the farrier, a specialist in equine hoof care.

All have made terrific progress in their recovery.  Those with overgrown hooves learned to walk properly again and all began going out into the livestock paddock on sunny days.

Thanks to special TLC from shelter staff, the personalities of these gentle creatures started to shine through as they relaxed in their new environment.  With their friendly and cuddly ways, the standard donkeys, FORREST (pictured below) and JENNY, in particular have endeared themselves to all their visitors!

Late last month, their previous owner officially surrendered them to the Animal Rescue League of Boston and potential adopters began asking about them almost immediately.

Ross, available for adoption!

Ross, available for adoption!

You can view the Ludlow animals currently available for adoption on our website.

If you would like to contribute to the costs of medical care and food for these animals and others like them, please click the button below to make a contribution today!

DONATE NOW

03-3-14 Forrest

Forrest loves posing for the camera!


5 Reasons Spay/Neuter is Good for Pets AND the People Who Love Them

Animal Rescue League of Boston to host #ARLAskaVet twitter chat on World Spay Day

Boston, MA – According to the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), a large portion of the companion animals coming into the organization’s shelters comes from unplanned litters of kittens and puppies.  National studies have also found that among pet owners who indicate their pets had at least one litter,  59% of cat owners and 38% of dog owners described the litter as “unintentional” or “accidental.” 

“Spay/neuter represents one of the most humane ways to lessen the number of homeless animals in our communities,” explains Dr. Edward Schettino, director of veterinary medical services at the ARL.  “The surgery comes with low risks and offers a variety of benefits to pets and the people who love them.”

01-11-14 Dr Schettino

In recognition of Spay/Neuter Awareness Month this February, the ARL encourages pet owners to consider the following five reasons to spay/neuter companion animals:

  1. Reduce the cost of pet ownership.  Particularly given the number of low-cost options available in Massachusetts, the cost of caring for an unplanned litter far outweighs the cost of having a pet spayed/neutered.
  2. Diminish nuisance behaviors.  Neutering resolves the vast majority of marking behaviors—even when a cat has a long-standing habit.  Howling in cats and excessive barking in dogs eases and even disappears after surgery.
  3. Prevent aggressive behaviors.  According to the National Canine Research Foundation, approximately 92% of fatal dog attacks involved male dogs, 94% of which were not neutered.  Neutering male dogs and cats reduces their urge to roam and fight with other males.
  4. Increase longevity.  The USA Today reports neutered male dogs live 18% longer than unneutered males, and spayed females live 23% longer than unspayed females.
  5. Improve health outlook.  Neutering males cats and dogs before six months of age prevents testicular cancer.  Spaying female cats and dogs before their first heat offers protection from uterine infections and breast cancer. 

35 Farm Animals Rescued from Unlicensed Traveling Petting Zoo

Animal Rescue League of Boston and MSPCA-Angell Work Together to Rescue Sickly Animals from the Cold

MEDIA AVAIL: Tuesday, February 11,2014 from 11 am – 12: 30 pm, Animal Rescue League of Boston’s Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center, 55 Anna’s Place, Dedham, MA.

Boston, MA – Over the weekend, the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and MSPCA-Angell worked together to rescue 35 cold and emaciated animals from an unlicensed petting zoo in Ludlow, Massachusetts.

02-10-14 Ludlow Rescue Goat & Brian

ARL Rescue Services Manager Brian O’Connor carries one of 12 animals rescued from an unlicensed traveling petting zoo in Ludlow, MA, on Friday evening.

The ARL’s Rescue Services team brought 12 of the rescued animals, including mini-donkeys, donkeys, ponies, sheep, and goats, to the organization’s Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center for immediate care. The MSPCA-Angell’s Law Enforcement department transported the more severely emaciated and sickly animals including pigs and alpacas to the organization’s Nevins Farm facility.

On Monday, the MSPCA-Angell’s Law Enforcement department charged the animal’s owner Dean Manual of Ludlow with multiple counts of animal cruelty. Manual, 43, faces up to 36 counts of animal cruelty with additional pending charges for assaulting a law enforcement officer and resisting arrest.

As the ARL and MSPCA-Angell tended to the animals on Friday evening in Ludlow, many neighbors expressed concern for the health of the animals and asked for information about contributing to their care.

Since their arrival, the animals at the ARL’s Dedham facility have received proper hydration, nutrition, and veterinary care. Animal care staff report all 12 continue to rest and recover from living in cruel conditions.

About the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Founded in 1899, the ARL is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect. The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need.

About the MSPCA-Angell

The MSPCA-Angell is a national and international leader in animal protection and veterinary medicine and provides direct hands-on care for thousands of animals each year. Founded in 1868, it is the second-oldest humane society in the United States. Services include animal protection and adoption, advocacy, humane education, law enforcement, and world-class veterinary care. The MSPCA-Angell is a private, non-profit organization. It does not receive any government funding nor is it funded or operated by any national humane organization. The MSPCA-Angell relies solely on the support and contributions from individuals who care about animals.

Media Avail
Tuesday, February 11, 2014
11 am – 12: 30 pm
Animal Rescue League of Boston
Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center
55 Anna’s Place
Dedham, MA